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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 26 total hits in 13 results.

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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry bernard-sir-francis
Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 Colonial governor; born in Nettleham, Lincoln co., England, in 1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard was recalled, when he was created a baronet, chiefly because of his recommendation to transfer the right of selecting the governor's council from the colonial legislature to the crown. Bernard was a friend of learning, and gave a part of his library to Harvard College. He had become so thoroughly unpopular that when he left Boston the bells were rung, cannon were fired, and Liberty-tree was hung with flags, in token of the joy of the people. He died in Aylesbury, England, June 16, 1779.
Aylesbury (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry bernard-sir-francis
Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 Colonial governor; born in Nettleham, Lincoln co., England, in 1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard was recalled, when he was created a baronet, chiefly because of his recommendation to transfer the right of selecting the governor's council from the colonial legislature to the crown. Bernard was a friend of learning, and gave a part of his library to Harvard College. He had become so thoroughly unpopular that when he left Boston the bells were rung, cannon were fired, and Liberty-tree was hung with flags, in token of the joy of the people. He died in Aylesbury, England, June 16, 1779.
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry bernard-sir-francis
Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 Colonial governor; born in Nettleham, Lincoln co., England, in 1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard was recalled, when he was created a baronet, chiefly because of his recommendation to transfer the right of selecting the governor's council from the colonial legislature to the crown. Bernard was a friend of learning, and gave a part of his library to Harvard College. He had become so thoroughly unpopular that when he left Boston the bells were rung, cannon were fired, and Liberty-tree was hung with flags, in token of the joy of the people. He died in Aylesbury, England, June 16, 1779.
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry bernard-sir-francis
Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 Colonial governor; born in Nettleham, Lincoln co., England, in 1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard was recalled, when he was created a baronet, chiefly because of his recommendation to transfer the right of selecting the governor's council from the colonial legislature to the crown. Bernard was a friend of learning, and gave a part of his library to Harvard College. He had become so thoroughly unpopular that when he left Boston the bells were rung, cannon were fired, and Liberty-tree was hung with flags, in token of the joy of the people. He died in Aylesbury, England, June 16, 1779.
Oxford (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry bernard-sir-francis
Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 Colonial governor; born in Nettleham, Lincoln co., England, in 1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard was recalled, when he was created a baronet, chiefly because of his recommendation to transfer the right of selecting the governor's council from the colonial legislature to the crown. Bernard was a friend of learning, and gave a part of his library to Harvard College. He had become so thoroughly unpopular that when he left Boston the bells were rung, cannon were fired, and Liberty-tree was hung with flags, in token of the joy of the people. He died in Aylesbury, England, June 16, 1779.
Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 Colonial governor; born in Nettleham, Lincoln co., England, in 1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard was recalled, when he was created a baronet, chiefly because of his recommendation to transfer the right of selecting the governor's council from the colonial legislagislature to the crown. Bernard was a friend of learning, and gave a part of his library to Harvard College. He had become so thoroughly unpopular that when he left Boston the bells were rung, cannon were fired, and Liberty-tree was hung with flags, in token of the joy of the people. He died in Aylesbury, England, June 16, 1779.
Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 Colonial governor; born in Nettleham, Lincoln co., England, in 1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard was recalled, when he was created a baronet, chiefly because of his recommendation to transfer the right of selecting the governor's council from the colonial legislature to the crown. Bernard was a friend of learning, and gave a part of his library to Harvard College. He had become so thoroughly unpopular that when he left Boston the bells were rung, cannon were fired, and Liberty-tree was hung with flags, in token of the joy of the people. He died in Aylesbury, England, June 16, 1779.
Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 Colonial governor; born in Nettleham, Lincoln co., England, in 1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard was recalled, when he was created a baronet, chiefly because of his recommendation to transfer the right of selecting the governor's council from the colonial legislature to the crown. Bernard was a friend of learning, and gave a part of his library to Harvard College. He had become so thoroughly unpopular that when he left Boston the bells were rung, cannon were fired, and Liberty-tree was hung with flags, in token of the joy of the people. He died in Aylesbury, England, June 16, 1779.
Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 Colonial governor; born in Nettleham, Lincoln co., England, in 1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard was recalled, when he was created a baronet, chiefly because of his recommendation to transfer the right of selecting the governor's council from the colonial legislature to the crown. Bernard was a friend of learning, and gave a part of his library to Harvard College. He had become so thoroughly unpopular that when he left Boston the bells were rung, cannon were fired, and Liberty-tree was hung with flags, in token of the joy of the people. He died in Aylesbury, England, June 16, 1779.
Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 Colonial governor; born in Nettleham, Lincoln co., England, in 1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard w1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard was recalled, when he was created a baronet, chiefly because of his recommendation to transfer the right of selecting the governor's council from the colonial legislature to the crown. Bernard was a friend of learning, and gave a part of his library to Harvard College. He had become so thoroughly unpopular that when he left Boston the bells were rung, cannon were fired, and Liberty-tree was hung with flags, in token of the joy of the people. He died in Aylesbury, England, June 16, 1779.
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