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Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): entry big-black-river-battle-at
ailway bridge, and were strongly fortified. Behind their defences on the eastern side of the river were several brigades; and above the bridge Pemberton had constructed a passage-way for troops, composed of the hulks of steamboats. General Carr's division led the Nationals, and first engaged in battle; and soon there was a fierce struggle between the two armies in the forest for three hours, when General Lawler, commanding Carr's right, gave an order for his brigade, composed of Iowa and Wisconsin troops, to charge. They sprang forward and drove the Confederates to their intrenchments, but suffered fearfully from an enfilading fire from a curtain of the Confederates' breastworks, which prostrated 150 of their number. The assailants waded a shallow bayou, and charged on the works before the Confederates had time to reload. Meanwhile, many of those within fled across the river, and communicated their own panic to the troops there. They expected the Nationals would immediately R
Edward's station (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry big-black-river-battle-at
Big Black River, battle at. From Champion Hills, the Confederates were pursued, and bivouacked during the night of May 16, 1863, on the hill overlooking Edwards' Station and the fertile plain between it and the Big Black River. The pursuit was renewed in the morning, but the Confederates were soon found well posted( on both sides of the river, near the railway bridge, and were strongly fortified. Behind their defences on the eastern side of the river were several brigades; and above the bridge Pemberton had constructed a passage-way for troops, composed of the hulks of steamboats. General Carr's division led the Nationals, and first engaged in battle; and soon there was a fierce struggle between the two armies in the forest for three hours, when General Lawler, commanding Carr's right, gave an order for his brigade, composed of Iowa and Wisconsin troops, to charge. They sprang forward and drove the Confederates to their intrenchments, but suffered fearfully from an enfilading
Big Black (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): entry big-black-river-battle-at
Big Black River, battle at. From Champion Hills, the Confederates were pursued, and bivouacked during the night of May 16, 1863, on the hill overlooking Edwards' Station and the fertile plain between it and the Big Black River. The pursuit wasBig Black River. The pursuit was renewed in the morning, but the Confederates were soon found well posted( on both sides of the river, near the railway bridge, and were strongly fortified. Behind their defences on the eastern side of the river were several brigades; and above the stores. They lost, in killed and wounded, 262 men. General Osterhaus, of the Nationals, was wounded, View on the Big Black River. and the command of his troops devolved upon Brig.-Gen. A. L. Lee. Sharp-shooters in the works on the high banks acs. Grant's pontoon train was with Sherman, who had been making his way from Jackson to another point (above) on the Big Black River. The Confederates at the bridge fled to Vicksburg. A floating bridge was constructed, and at the same time (May 18
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): entry big-black-river-battle-at
, near the railway bridge, and were strongly fortified. Behind their defences on the eastern side of the river were several brigades; and above the bridge Pemberton had constructed a passage-way for troops, composed of the hulks of steamboats. General Carr's division led the Nationals, and first engaged in battle; and soon there was a fierce struggle between the two armies in the forest for three hours, when General Lawler, commanding Carr's right, gave an order for his brigade, composed of Iowa and Wisconsin troops, to charge. They sprang forward and drove the Confederates to their intrenchments, but suffered fearfully from an enfilading fire from a curtain of the Confederates' breastworks, which prostrated 150 of their number. The assailants waded a shallow bayou, and charged on the works before the Confederates had time to reload. Meanwhile, many of those within fled across the river, and communicated their own panic to the troops there. They expected the Nationals would imme
River. cross the stream; so they burned both bridges — cutting off the retreat of their comrades, who were yet fighting. They fled pell-mell towards the defences around Vicksburg. the assailed garrison, about 1,500 strong, was captured, with seventeen guns, several thousand small-arms, and a large quantity of stores. They lost, in killed and wounded, 262 men. General Osterhaus, of the Nationals, was wounded, View on the Big Black River. and the command of his troops devolved upon Brig.-Gen. A. L. Lee. Sharp-shooters in the works on the high banks across the river covered the retreat of the Confederates, and for hours kept the Nationals from constructing floating bridges. Grant's pontoon train was with Sherman, who had been making his way from Jackson to another point (above) on the Big Black River. The Confederates at the bridge fled to Vicksburg. A floating bridge was constructed, and at the same time (May 18, 1863) the three corps crossed the river, and began the siege of Vi
r, and communicated their own panic to the troops there. They expected the Nationals would immediately Rattle at Rig Black River. cross the stream; so they burned both bridges — cutting off the retreat of their comrades, who were yet fighting. They fled pell-mell towards the defences around Vicksburg. the assailed garrison, about 1,500 strong, was captured, with seventeen guns, several thousand small-arms, and a large quantity of stores. They lost, in killed and wounded, 262 men. General Osterhaus, of the Nationals, was wounded, View on the Big Black River. and the command of his troops devolved upon Brig.-Gen. A. L. Lee. Sharp-shooters in the works on the high banks across the river covered the retreat of the Confederates, and for hours kept the Nationals from constructing floating bridges. Grant's pontoon train was with Sherman, who had been making his way from Jackson to another point (above) on the Big Black River. The Confederates at the bridge fled to Vicksburg. A fl
g, but the Confederates were soon found well posted( on both sides of the river, near the railway bridge, and were strongly fortified. Behind their defences on the eastern side of the river were several brigades; and above the bridge Pemberton had constructed a passage-way for troops, composed of the hulks of steamboats. General Carr's division led the Nationals, and first engaged in battle; and soon there was a fierce struggle between the two armies in the forest for three hours, when General Lawler, commanding Carr's right, gave an order for his brigade, composed of Iowa and Wisconsin troops, to charge. They sprang forward and drove the Confederates to their intrenchments, but suffered fearfully from an enfilading fire from a curtain of the Confederates' breastworks, which prostrated 150 of their number. The assailants waded a shallow bayou, and charged on the works before the Confederates had time to reload. Meanwhile, many of those within fled across the river, and communicat
near the railway bridge, and were strongly fortified. Behind their defences on the eastern side of the river were several brigades; and above the bridge Pemberton had constructed a passage-way for troops, composed of the hulks of steamboats. General Carr's division led the Nationals, and first engaged in battle; and soon there was a fierce struggle between the two armies in the forest for three hours, when General Lawler, commanding Carr's right, gave an order for his brigade, composed of IowaCarr's right, gave an order for his brigade, composed of Iowa and Wisconsin troops, to charge. They sprang forward and drove the Confederates to their intrenchments, but suffered fearfully from an enfilading fire from a curtain of the Confederates' breastworks, which prostrated 150 of their number. The assailants waded a shallow bayou, and charged on the works before the Confederates had time to reload. Meanwhile, many of those within fled across the river, and communicated their own panic to the troops there. They expected the Nationals would immedi
oss the stream; so they burned both bridges — cutting off the retreat of their comrades, who were yet fighting. They fled pell-mell towards the defences around Vicksburg. the assailed garrison, about 1,500 strong, was captured, with seventeen guns, several thousand small-arms, and a large quantity of stores. They lost, in killed and wounded, 262 men. General Osterhaus, of the Nationals, was wounded, View on the Big Black River. and the command of his troops devolved upon Brig.-Gen. A. L. Lee. Sharp-shooters in the works on the high banks across the river covered the retreat of the Confederates, and for hours kept the Nationals from constructing floating bridges. Grant's pontoon train was with Sherman, who had been making his way from Jackson to another point (above) on the Big Black River. The Confederates at the bridge fled to Vicksburg. A floating bridge was constructed, and at the same time (May 18, 1863) the three corps crossed the river, and began the siege of Vicksbur
oss the stream; so they burned both bridges — cutting off the retreat of their comrades, who were yet fighting. They fled pell-mell towards the defences around Vicksburg. the assailed garrison, about 1,500 strong, was captured, with seventeen guns, several thousand small-arms, and a large quantity of stores. They lost, in killed and wounded, 262 men. General Osterhaus, of the Nationals, was wounded, View on the Big Black River. and the command of his troops devolved upon Brig.-Gen. A. L. Lee. Sharp-shooters in the works on the high banks across the river covered the retreat of the Confederates, and for hours kept the Nationals from constructing floating bridges. Grant's pontoon train was with Sherman, who had been making his way from Jackson to another point (above) on the Big Black River. The Confederates at the bridge fled to Vicksburg. A floating bridge was constructed, and at the same time (May 18, 1863) the three corps crossed the river, and began the siege of Vicksbur
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