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Bland, Theodoric, 1742-1790 Military officer; born in Prince George county, Va., in 1742; was, by his maternal side, fourth in descent from Pocahontas (q. v.), his mother being Jane Rolfe. John Randolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Virg1742; was, by his maternal side, fourth in descent from Pocahontas (q. v.), his mother being Jane Rolfe. John Randolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Virginia cavalry, and joined the main Continental army as lieutenant-colonel in 1777. Brave, vigilant, and judicious, he was intrusted with the command of Burgoyne's captive troops at Albemarle Barracks in Virginia; and was member of the Continental Congress in 1780-83. In the legislature and in the convention of his State he opposed the adoption of the national Constitution; but represented Virginia in the first Congress held under it, dying while it was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as w
Bland, Theodoric, 1742-1790 Military officer; born in Prince George county, Va., in 1742; was, by his maternal side, fourth in descent from Pocahontas (q. v.), his mother being Jane Rolfe. John Randolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Virginia cavalry, and joined the main Continental army as lieutenant-colonel in 1777. Brave, vigilant, and judicious, he was intrusted with the command of Burgoyne's captive troops at Albemarle Barracks in Virginia; and was member of the Continental Congress in 1780-83. In the legislature and in the convention of his State he opposed the adoption of the national Constitution; but represented Virginia in the first Congress held under it, dying while it was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as w
y, Va., in 1742; was, by his maternal side, fourth in descent from Pocahontas (q. v.), his mother being Jane Rolfe. John Randolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Virginia cavalry, and joined the main Continental army as lieutenant-colonel in 1777. Brave, vigilant, and judicious, he was intrusted with the command of Burgoyne's captive troops at Albemarle Barracks in Virginia; and was member of the Continental Congress in 1780-83. In the legislature and in the convention of his State he opposed the adoption of the national Constitution; but represented Virginia in the first Congress held under it, dying while it was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as well as a soldier and patriot. The Bland papers, containing many valuable memo
andolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Virginia cavalry, and joined the main Continental army as lieutenant-colonel in 1777. Brave, vigilant, and judicious, he was intrusted with the command of Burgoyne's captive troops at Albemarle Barracks in Virginia; and was member of the Continental Congress in 1780-83. In the legislature and in the convention of his State he opposed the adoption of the national Constitution; but represented Virginia in the first Congress held under it, dying while it was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as well as a soldier and patriot. The Bland papers, containing many valuable memorials of the Revolution, were edited and published by Charles Campbell in 1840-43. He died in New York City. June 1, 1790.
andolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Virginia cavalry, and joined the main Continental army as lieutenant-colonel in 1777. Brave, vigilant, and judicious, he was intrusted with the command of Burgoyne's captive troops at Albemarle Barracks in Virginia; and was member of the Continental Congress in 1780-83. In the legislature and in the convention of his State he opposed the adoption of the national Constitution; but represented Virginia in the first Congress held under it, dying while it was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as well as a soldier and patriot. The Bland papers, containing many valuable memorials of the Revolution, were edited and published by Charles Campbell in 1840-43. He died in New York City. June 1, 1790.
Bland, Theodoric, 1742-1790 Military officer; born in Prince George county, Va., in 1742; was, by his maternal side, fourth in descent from Pocahontas (q. v.), his mother being Jane Rolfe. John Randolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Virginia cavalry, and joined the main Continental army as lieutenant-colonel in 1777. Brave, vigilant, and judicious, he was intrusted with the command of Burgoyne's captive troops at Albemarle Barracks in Virginia; and was member of the Continental Congress in 1780-83. In the legislature and in the convention of his State he opposed the adoption of the national Constitution; but represented Virginia in the first Congress held under it, dying while it was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as w
June 1st, 1790 AD (search for this): entry bland-theodoric
andolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Virginia cavalry, and joined the main Continental army as lieutenant-colonel in 1777. Brave, vigilant, and judicious, he was intrusted with the command of Burgoyne's captive troops at Albemarle Barracks in Virginia; and was member of the Continental Congress in 1780-83. In the legislature and in the convention of his State he opposed the adoption of the national Constitution; but represented Virginia in the first Congress held under it, dying while it was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as well as a soldier and patriot. The Bland papers, containing many valuable memorials of the Revolution, were edited and published by Charles Campbell in 1840-43. He died in New York City. June 1, 1790.
andolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Virginia cavalry, and joined the main Continental army as lieutenant-colonel in 1777. Brave, vigilant, and judicious, he was intrusted with the command of Burgoyne's captive troops at Albemarle Barracks in Virginia; and was member of the Continental Congress in 1780-83. In the legislature and in the convention of his State he opposed the adoption of the national Constitution; but represented Virginia in the first Congress held under it, dying while it was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as well as a soldier and patriot. The Bland papers, containing many valuable memorials of the Revolution, were edited and published by Charles Campbell in 1840-43. He died in New York City. June 1, 1790.
andolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Virginia cavalry, and joined the main Continental army as lieutenant-colonel in 1777. Brave, vigilant, and judicious, he was intrusted with the command of Burgoyne's captive troops at Albemarle Barracks in Virginia; and was member of the Continental Congress in 1780-83. In the legislature and in the convention of his State he opposed the adoption of the national Constitution; but represented Virginia in the first Congress held under it, dying while it was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as well as a soldier and patriot. The Bland papers, containing many valuable memorials of the Revolution, were edited and published by Charles Campbell in 1840-43. He died in New York City. June 1, 1790.
Bland, Theodoric, 1742-1790 Military officer; born in Prince George county, Va., in 1742; was, by his maternal side, fourth in descent from Pocahontas (q. v.), his mother being Jane Rolfe. John Randolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Vir national Constitution; but represented Virginia in the first Congress held under it, dying while it was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as well as a soldier and patriot. The Bland papers, containing many valuable memorials of the Revolution,t was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as well as a soldier and patriot. The Bland papers, containing many valuable memorials of the Revolution, were edited and published by Charles Campbell in 1840-43. He died in New York City. June 1, 1790.
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