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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): entry botetourt-norborne-berkeley-baron
and other in-signia of vice-regal pomp: and entered upon his duties with a determination to enforce submission to parliamentary authority. With a generous mind he perceived the righteousness of colonial indignation because of the taxation schemes of the ministry, and he forwarded to England remonstrances of the representatives of the people, with his own opinion against the wisdom and justice of parliamentary measures. In interfering with the wishes of the people, he obeyed instructions rather than the promptings of his own will. A malarial fever which attacked him was so aggravated by chagrin because of the aspect of political affairs that he died at his post Oct. 15, 1770. The colony erected his statue in front of the capitol in 1774, for he was generally beloved by the people. In 1797 it was removed to the front of William and Mary College, of which he was a benefactor; and thence it was talked to the enclosure of the Asylum for the Insane in Williamsburg during the Civil War.
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry botetourt-norborne-berkeley-baron
title having been in abeyance since 1406) in April, 1764. He succeeded Sir Jeffrey Amherst has governor-in-chief of Virginia, and arrived there in November, 1768. Having been instructed to assume great dignity, he appeared in the street, of Williamsburg in a coach, with guards and other in-signia of vice-regal pomp: and entered upon his duties with a determination to enforce submission to parliamentary authority. With a generous mind he perceived the righteousness of colonial indignation becr than the promptings of his own will. A malarial fever which attacked him was so aggravated by chagrin because of the aspect of political affairs that he died at his post Oct. 15, 1770. The colony erected his statue in front of the capitol in 1774, for he was generally beloved by the people. In 1797 it was removed to the front of William and Mary College, of which he was a benefactor; and thence it was talked to the enclosure of the Asylum for the Insane in Williamsburg during the Civil War.
Gloucestershire (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry botetourt-norborne-berkeley-baron
Botetourt, Norborne Berkeley, Baron, Colonial governor; born in Gloucestershire, England, about 1717. But little is known of his career in his earlier life. He was colonel of the Gloucestershire militia, and was summoned to Parliament as Baron Botetourt (the title having been in abeyance since 1406) in April, 1764. He succeeded Sir Jeffrey Amherst has governor-in-chief of Virginia, and arrived there in November, 1768. Having been instructed to assume great dignity, he appeared in the street, of Williamsburg in a coach, with guards and other in-signia of vice-regal pomp: and entered upon his duties with a determination to enforce submission to parliamentary authority. With a generous mind he perceived the righteousness of colonial indignation because of the taxation schemes of the ministry, and he forwarded to England remonstrances of the representatives of the people, with his own opinion against the wisdom and justice of parliamentary measures. In interfering with the wishe
ed Sir Jeffrey Amherst has governor-in-chief of Virginia, and arrived there in November, 1768. Having been instructed to assume great dignity, he appeared in the street, of Williamsburg in a coach, with guards and other in-signia of vice-regal pomp: and entered upon his duties with a determination to enforce submission to parliamentary authority. With a generous mind he perceived the righteousness of colonial indignation because of the taxation schemes of the ministry, and he forwarded to England remonstrances of the representatives of the people, with his own opinion against the wisdom and justice of parliamentary measures. In interfering with the wishes of the people, he obeyed instructions rather than the promptings of his own will. A malarial fever which attacked him was so aggravated by chagrin because of the aspect of political affairs that he died at his post Oct. 15, 1770. The colony erected his statue in front of the capitol in 1774, for he was generally beloved by the p
Botetourt, Norborne Berkeley, Baron, Colonial governor; born in Gloucestershire, England, about 1717. But little is known of his career in his earlier life. He was colonel of the Gloucestershire militia, and was summoned to Parliament as Baron Botetourt (the title having been in abeyance since 1406) in April, 1764. He succeeded Sir Jeffrey Amherst has governor-in-chief of Virginia, and arrived there in November, 1768. Having been instructed to assume great dignity, he appeared in the sBaron Botetourt (the title having been in abeyance since 1406) in April, 1764. He succeeded Sir Jeffrey Amherst has governor-in-chief of Virginia, and arrived there in November, 1768. Having been instructed to assume great dignity, he appeared in the street, of Williamsburg in a coach, with guards and other in-signia of vice-regal pomp: and entered upon his duties with a determination to enforce submission to parliamentary authority. With a generous mind he perceived the righteousness of colonial indignation because of the taxation schemes of the ministry, and he forwarded to England remonstrances of the representatives of the people, with his own opinion against the wisdom and justice of parliamentary measures. In interfering with the wis
Botetourt, Norborne Berkeley, Baron, Colonial governor; born in Gloucestershire, England, about 1717. But little is known of his career in his earlier life. He was colonel of the Gloucestershire militia, and was summoned to Parliament as Baron Botetourt (the title having been in abeyance since 1406) in April, 1764. He succeeded Sir Jeffrey Amherst has governor-in-chief of Virginia, and arrived there in November, 1768. Having been instructed to assume great dignity, he appeared in the street, of Williamsburg in a coach, with guards and other in-signia of vice-regal pomp: and entered upon his duties with a determination to enforce submission to parliamentary authority. With a generous mind he perceived the righteousness of colonial indignation because of the taxation schemes of the ministry, and he forwarded to England remonstrances of the representatives of the people, with his own opinion against the wisdom and justice of parliamentary measures. In interfering with the wish
Botetourt, Norborne Berkeley, Baron, Colonial governor; born in Gloucestershire, England, about 1717. But little is known of his career in his earlier life. He was colonel of the Gloucestershire militia, and was summoned to Parliament as Baron Botetourt (the title having been in abeyance since 1406) in April, 1764. He succeeded Sir Jeffrey Amherst has governor-in-chief of Virginia, and arrived there in November, 1768. Having been instructed to assume great dignity, he appeared in the street, of Williamsburg in a coach, with guards and other in-signia of vice-regal pomp: and entered upon his duties with a determination to enforce submission to parliamentary authority. With a generous mind he perceived the righteousness of colonial indignation because of the taxation schemes of the ministry, and he forwarded to England remonstrances of the representatives of the people, with his own opinion against the wisdom and justice of parliamentary measures. In interfering with the wishe
and other in-signia of vice-regal pomp: and entered upon his duties with a determination to enforce submission to parliamentary authority. With a generous mind he perceived the righteousness of colonial indignation because of the taxation schemes of the ministry, and he forwarded to England remonstrances of the representatives of the people, with his own opinion against the wisdom and justice of parliamentary measures. In interfering with the wishes of the people, he obeyed instructions rather than the promptings of his own will. A malarial fever which attacked him was so aggravated by chagrin because of the aspect of political affairs that he died at his post Oct. 15, 1770. The colony erected his statue in front of the capitol in 1774, for he was generally beloved by the people. In 1797 it was removed to the front of William and Mary College, of which he was a benefactor; and thence it was talked to the enclosure of the Asylum for the Insane in Williamsburg during the Civil War.
Botetourt, Norborne Berkeley, Baron, Colonial governor; born in Gloucestershire, England, about 1717. But little is known of his career in his earlier life. He was colonel of the Gloucestershire militia, and was summoned to Parliament as Baron Botetourt (the title having been in abeyance since 1406) in April, 1764. He succeeded Sir Jeffrey Amherst has governor-in-chief of Virginia, and arrived there in November, 1768. Having been instructed to assume great dignity, he appeared in the street, of Williamsburg in a coach, with guards and other in-signia of vice-regal pomp: and entered upon his duties with a determination to enforce submission to parliamentary authority. With a generous mind he perceived the righteousness of colonial indignation because of the taxation schemes of the ministry, and he forwarded to England remonstrances of the representatives of the people, with his own opinion against the wisdom and justice of parliamentary measures. In interfering with the wish
Botetourt, Norborne Berkeley, Baron, Colonial governor; born in Gloucestershire, England, about 1717. But little is known of his career in his earlier life. He was colonel of the Gloucestershire militia, and was summoned to Parliament as Baron Botetourt (the title having been in abeyance since 1406) in April, 1764. He succeeded Sir Jeffrey Amherst has governor-in-chief of Virginia, and arrived there in November, 1768. Having been instructed to assume great dignity, he appeared in the street, of Williamsburg in a coach, with guards and other in-signia of vice-regal pomp: and entered upon his duties with a determination to enforce submission to parliamentary authority. With a generous mind he perceived the righteousness of colonial indignation because of the taxation schemes of the ministry, and he forwarded to England remonstrances of the representatives of the people, with his own opinion against the wisdom and justice of parliamentary measures. In interfering with the wishe
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