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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 22 total hits in 8 results.

United States (United States) (search for this): entry breakwater
Breakwater, In civil engineering, a construction struction in deep water to protect an anchorage for vessels during storms and for other purposes. They are technically classified as sloping, composite, and vertical. The most notable breakwater in the United States is at the entrance of Delaware Bay, which cost considerably over $2,000,000. There are others at Galveston, Tex.; at Buffalo, Chicago, and Oswego, on the Great Lakes, and at several ports of entry in the Southern States, which have been constructed by the federal government since the close of the Civil War. The Eads jetties, below New Orleans, are practically a breakwater construction, although built for a different purpose.
Galveston (Texas, United States) (search for this): entry breakwater
Breakwater, In civil engineering, a construction struction in deep water to protect an anchorage for vessels during storms and for other purposes. They are technically classified as sloping, composite, and vertical. The most notable breakwater in the United States is at the entrance of Delaware Bay, which cost considerably over $2,000,000. There are others at Galveston, Tex.; at Buffalo, Chicago, and Oswego, on the Great Lakes, and at several ports of entry in the Southern States, which have been constructed by the federal government since the close of the Civil War. The Eads jetties, below New Orleans, are practically a breakwater construction, although built for a different purpose.
Delaware Bay (United States) (search for this): entry breakwater
Breakwater, In civil engineering, a construction struction in deep water to protect an anchorage for vessels during storms and for other purposes. They are technically classified as sloping, composite, and vertical. The most notable breakwater in the United States is at the entrance of Delaware Bay, which cost considerably over $2,000,000. There are others at Galveston, Tex.; at Buffalo, Chicago, and Oswego, on the Great Lakes, and at several ports of entry in the Southern States, which have been constructed by the federal government since the close of the Civil War. The Eads jetties, below New Orleans, are practically a breakwater construction, although built for a different purpose.
Buffalo, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry breakwater
Breakwater, In civil engineering, a construction struction in deep water to protect an anchorage for vessels during storms and for other purposes. They are technically classified as sloping, composite, and vertical. The most notable breakwater in the United States is at the entrance of Delaware Bay, which cost considerably over $2,000,000. There are others at Galveston, Tex.; at Buffalo, Chicago, and Oswego, on the Great Lakes, and at several ports of entry in the Southern States, which have been constructed by the federal government since the close of the Civil War. The Eads jetties, below New Orleans, are practically a breakwater construction, although built for a different purpose.
Oswego (New York, United States) (search for this): entry breakwater
Breakwater, In civil engineering, a construction struction in deep water to protect an anchorage for vessels during storms and for other purposes. They are technically classified as sloping, composite, and vertical. The most notable breakwater in the United States is at the entrance of Delaware Bay, which cost considerably over $2,000,000. There are others at Galveston, Tex.; at Buffalo, Chicago, and Oswego, on the Great Lakes, and at several ports of entry in the Southern States, which have been constructed by the federal government since the close of the Civil War. The Eads jetties, below New Orleans, are practically a breakwater construction, although built for a different purpose.
Breakwater, In civil engineering, a construction struction in deep water to protect an anchorage for vessels during storms and for other purposes. They are technically classified as sloping, composite, and vertical. The most notable breakwater in the United States is at the entrance of Delaware Bay, which cost considerably over $2,000,000. There are others at Galveston, Tex.; at Buffalo, Chicago, and Oswego, on the Great Lakes, and at several ports of entry in the Southern States, which have been constructed by the federal government since the close of the Civil War. The Eads jetties, below New Orleans, are practically a breakwater construction, although built for a different purpose.
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry breakwater
Breakwater, In civil engineering, a construction struction in deep water to protect an anchorage for vessels during storms and for other purposes. They are technically classified as sloping, composite, and vertical. The most notable breakwater in the United States is at the entrance of Delaware Bay, which cost considerably over $2,000,000. There are others at Galveston, Tex.; at Buffalo, Chicago, and Oswego, on the Great Lakes, and at several ports of entry in the Southern States, which have been constructed by the federal government since the close of the Civil War. The Eads jetties, below New Orleans, are practically a breakwater construction, although built for a different purpose.
Breakwater, In civil engineering, a construction struction in deep water to protect an anchorage for vessels during storms and for other purposes. They are technically classified as sloping, composite, and vertical. The most notable breakwater in the United States is at the entrance of Delaware Bay, which cost considerably over $2,000,000. There are others at Galveston, Tex.; at Buffalo, Chicago, and Oswego, on the Great Lakes, and at several ports of entry in the Southern States, which have been constructed by the federal government since the close of the Civil War. The Eads jetties, below New Orleans, are practically a breakwater construction, although built for a different purpose.