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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry brooks-preston-smith
Brooks, Preston Smith, 1819- Legislator; born in Edgefield District, S. C., Aug. 4, 1819; was graduated at the South Carolina College in 1839: admitted to the bar in 1843; and elected to the State legislature in the following year. He served with the South Carolina Palmetto Regiment through the Mexican War, and afterwards engaged in planting. He was elected to Congress as a State-Rights Democrat in 1853, and held his seat till his death, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27, 1857. On May 22, 1856, he made a murderous assault on Charles Sumner, who had remained in his seat in the Senate Chamber attending to some unfinished business after the adjournment of the Senate for the day. Mr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till his death. When the fact of the assault became known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the resol
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry brooks-preston-smith
resolution came up for final action it was defeated through lack of the required two-thirds vote. Soon afterwards Representative Anson Burlingame (q. v.), of Massachusetts, challenged Mr. Brooks to fight a duel in consequence of words used in a debate in the House, but Mr. Brooks failed to appear at the designated time and place assault. On July 14. 1856,. Mr. Brooks, in resigning his seat in Congress. delivered the following speech: Mr. Speaker,--Some time since a Senator from Massachusetts allowed himself, in an elaborately prepared speech, to offer a gross insult to my State, and to a venerable friend, who is my State representative, and who wasing redress into my own hands T meant no disrespect to the Senate of the United States or to this House. Neither did I design insult or disrespect to the State of Massachusetts. I was aware of the personal responsibilities I incurred, and was willing to meet them. I knew, too, that I was amenable to the laws of the country, whi
Edgefield (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry brooks-preston-smith
Brooks, Preston Smith, 1819- Legislator; born in Edgefield District, S. C., Aug. 4, 1819; was graduated at the South Carolina College in 1839: admitted to the bar in 1843; and elected to the State legislature in the following year. He served with the South Carolina Palmetto Regiment through the Mexican War, and afterwards engaged in planting. He was elected to Congress as a State-Rights Democrat in 1853, and held his seat till his death, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27, 1857. On May 22, 1856, he made a murderous assault on Charles Sumner, who had remained in his seat in the Senate Chamber attending to some unfinished business after the adjournment of the Senate for the day. Mr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till his death. When the fact of the assault became known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the reso
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry brooks-preston-smith
, shall inaugurate revolution; but when you, Mr. Speaker, return to your own home, and hear the people of the great North--and they are a great people — speak of me as a bad man. you will do me the justice to say that a blow struck by me at this time would be followed by revolution, and this I know. (Applause and hisses in the gallery.) Mr. Brooks (resuming) :--If I desired to kill the Senator, why did not I do it? You all admit that I had him in my power. Let me tell the member from New Jersey that it was expressly to avoid taking life that I used an ordinary cane, presented to me by a friend in Baltimore, nearly three months before its application to the bare head of the Massachusetts Senator. I went to work very deliberately, as I am charged — and this is admitted — and speculated somewhat as to whether I should employ a horsewhip or a cowhide: but knowing that the Senator was my superior in strength, it occurred to me that he might wrest it from my hand. and then — for I n
Washington (United States) (search for this): entry brooks-preston-smith
Brooks, Preston Smith, 1819- Legislator; born in Edgefield District, S. C., Aug. 4, 1819; was graduated at the South Carolina College in 1839: admitted to the bar in 1843; and elected to the State legislature in the following year. He served with the South Carolina Palmetto Regiment through the Mexican War, and afterwards engaged in planting. He was elected to Congress as a State-Rights Democrat in 1853, and held his seat till his death, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27, 1857. On May 22, 1856, he made a murderous assault on Charles Sumner, who had remained in his seat in the Senate Chamber attending to some unfinished business after the adjournment of the Senate for the day. Mr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till his death. When the fact of the assault became known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the reso
ame known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the resolution came up for final action it was defeated through lack of the required two-thirds vote. Soon afterwards Representative Anson Burlingame (q. v.), of Massachusetts, challenged Mr. Brooks to fight a duel in consequence of words used in a debate in the House, but Mr. Brooks failed to appear at the designated time and place in Canada. After the assault Mr. Brooks resigned his seat in the House, but his constituents immediately re-elected him, and he was presented with numerous tokens of esteem by friends in different parts of the South. His defence of the assault. On July 14. 1856,. Mr. Brooks, in resigning his seat in Congress. delivered the following speech: Mr. Speaker,--Some time since a Senator from Massachusetts allowed himself, in an elaborately prepared speech, to offer a gross insult to my State, and
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry brooks-preston-smith
North--and they are a great people — speak of me as a bad man. you will do me the justice to say that a blow struck by me at this time would be followed by revolution, and this I know. (Applause and hisses in the gallery.) Mr. Brooks (resuming) :--If I desired to kill the Senator, why did not I do it? You all admit that I had him in my power. Let me tell the member from New Jersey that it was expressly to avoid taking life that I used an ordinary cane, presented to me by a friend in Baltimore, nearly three months before its application to the bare head of the Massachusetts Senator. I went to work very deliberately, as I am charged — and this is admitted — and speculated somewhat as to whether I should employ a horsewhip or a cowhide: but knowing that the Senator was my superior in strength, it occurred to me that he might wrest it from my hand. and then — for I never attempt anything I do not perform — I might have been compelled to do that which I would have regretted the
rmit a member of Congress to publish and circulate a libel on another, and then call upon either House to protect him against the personal responsibilities which he had thus incurred. But if I hadjustice, how easy it will be to use such precedents for the excuse of arbitrary power, in either House, to expel members of the minority who may have rendered themselves obnoxious to the prevailing spirit in the House to which they belong. Matters may go smoothly enough when one House asks the other to punish a member who is offensive to a majority of its own body; but how will it he when, upon a pretence of insulted dignity, demands are made of this House to expel a member who happens to run counter to its party predilections, or other demands which it may not be so agreeable to grant? temptations to collision. or to extend so far the discretionary power which was given to either House to punish its own members for the violation of its rules and orders. Discretion has been said t
rough the Mexican War, and afterwards engaged in planting. He was elected to Congress as a State-Rights Democrat in 1853, and held his seat till his death, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27, 1857. On May 22, 1856, he made a murderous assault on Charles Sumner, who had remained in his seat in the Senate Chamber attending to some unfinished business after the adjournment of the Senate for the day. Mr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till hiMr. Sumner became insensible from the attack, and is said to have suffered more or less from it till his death. When the fact of the assault became known, the House of Representatives directed an investigation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the resolution came up for final action it was defeated through lack of the required two-thirds vote. Soon afterwards Representative Anson Burlingame (q. v.), of Massachusetts, challenged Mr. Brooks to fight a duel in consequence of words used in a debate in the House, but Mr. Brooks failed to appe
Brooks, Preston Smith, 1819- Legislator; born in Edgefield District, S. C., Aug. 4, 1819; was graduated at the South Cargation, and its committee reported in favor of expelling Mr. Brooks. Subsequently, however, when the resolution came up foe Anson Burlingame (q. v.), of Massachusetts, challenged Mr. Brooks to fight a duel in consequence of words used in a debate in the House, but Mr. Brooks failed to appear at the designated time and place in Canada. After the assault Mr. Brooks resMr. Brooks resigned his seat in the House, but his constituents immediately re-elected him, and he was presented with numerous tokens of eth. His defence of the assault. On July 14. 1856,. Mr. Brooks, in resigning his seat in Congress. delivered the follod this I know. (Applause and hisses in the gallery.) Mr. Brooks (resuming) :--If I desired to kill the Senator, why did to this House, that I am no longer a member of the thirty-fourth Congress. Mr. Brooks then withdrew from the chamber.
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