hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 101 total hits in 37 results.

1 2 3 4
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry bryan-william-jennings
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860- Politician; born in Salem, Ill., March 19, 1860; was graduated at Illinois College in 1881, and at Union College of Law, Chicago, in 1883. He practised in Jacksonville, Ill., from 1883 till 1887, then removed to Lincoln, Neb., and was elected to Congress as a Democrat, serving in 1891-95. In 1894-96 he was editor of the Omaha World-Herald, and in the latter year a delegate to the National Democratic Convention at Chicago. He there made a notable speech advocating the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the ratio of 16 to 1. The free-silver element in the convention was far stronger than the leaders of the party imatablished a weekly newspaper for the purpose of continuing his efforts in behalf of free silver. The cross of gold. At the National Democratic Convention in Chicago, in 1896, Mr. Bryan delivered the following speech in the debate on the party platform: Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen of the Convention.--I would be presumptuous,
America (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry bryan-william-jennings
protects him, I find a man who is unworthy to enjoy the blessings of a government like ours. They say that we are opposing national bank currency; it is true. If you will read what Thomas Benton said, you will find he said that, in searching history, he could find but one parallel to Andrew Jackson; that was Cicero, who destroyed the conspiracy of Catiline and saved Rome. Benton said that (Cicero only did for Rome what Jackson did for us when he destroyed the bank conspiracy and saved America. We say in our platform that we believe that the right to coin and issue money is a function of government. We believe it. We believe that it is a part of sovereignty, and can no more with safety be delegated to private individuals than we could afford to delegate to private individuals the power to make penal statutes or levy taxes. Mr. Jefferson, who was once regarded as good Democratic authority, seems to have differed in opinion from the gentleman who has addressed us on the part of
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry bryan-william-jennings
find ourselves brought into conflict with those who are now arrayed on the other side. The gentleman who preceded me (ex-Governor Russell) spoke of the State of Massachusetts. Let me assure him that not one present in all this convention entertains the least hostility to the people who are the equals, before the law, of the greatest citizens in the State of Massachusetts. When you (turning to the gold delegates) come before us and tell us that we are about to disturb your business interests, we reply that you have disturbed our business interests by your course. We say to you that you have made the definition of a business too limited in its applicor consent of any other nation on earth; and upon that issue we expect to carry every State in the Union. I shall rot slander the inhabitants of the fair State of Massachusetts nor the inhabitants of the State of New York by saying that, when they are confronted with the proposition, they will declare that this nation is not able
Salem, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry bryan-william-jennings
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860- Politician; born in Salem, Ill., March 19, 1860; was graduated at Illinois College in 1881, and at Union College of Law, Chicago, in 1883. He practised in Jacksonville, Ill., from 1883 till 1887, then removed to Lincoln, Neb., and was elected to Congress as a Democrat, serving in 1891-95. In 1894-96 he was editor of the Omaha World-Herald, and in the latter year a delegate to the National Democratic Convention at Chicago. He there made a notable speech advocating the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the ratio of 16 to 1. The free-silver element in the convention was far stronger than the leaders of the party imagined, and there was as munch surprise in the convention as out of it when its prize, the Presidential nomination, was awarded to him. The Sound-money Democrats repudiated the nomination, organized the National Democratic party, and put forth a separate platform and national ticket. The Populists, however, adopted the Democratic n
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry bryan-william-jennings
never be the verdict of our people. Therefore, we care not upon what lines the battle is fought. If they say bimetallism is good, but that we cannot have it until other nations help us, we reply that, instead of having a gold standard because England has, we will restore bimetallism, and then let England have bimetallism because the United States has it. If they dare to come out in the open field and defend the gold standard as a good thing, we will fight them to the uttermost. Having behinEngland have bimetallism because the United States has it. If they dare to come out in the open field and defend the gold standard as a good thing, we will fight them to the uttermost. Having behind us the producing masses of this nation and the world, supported by the commercial interests, the laboring interests, and the toilers everywhere, we will answer their demand for a gold standard by saying to them: You shall not press down upon the brow of labor this crown of thorns, you shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold.
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): entry bryan-william-jennings
of our party as any people in this country. It is for these that we speak. We do not come as aggressors. Our war is not a war of conquest; we are fighting in the defence of our homes, our families, and posterity. We have petitioned. and our petitions have been scorned; we have entreated, and our entreaties have been disregarded: we have begged, and they have mocked when our calamity came. We beg no longer: we entreat no more: we petition no more. We defy them. The gentleman from Wisconsin has said that he fears a Robespierre. My friends, in this land of the free you need not fear that a tyrant will spring up from among the people. What we need is an Andrew Jackson to stand, as Jackson stood, against the encroachments of organized wealth. They tell us that this platform was made to catch votes. We reply to them that changing conditions make new issues; that the principles upon which Democracy rests are as everlasting as the hills, but that they must be applied to new
Lincoln (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): entry bryan-william-jennings
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860- Politician; born in Salem, Ill., March 19, 1860; was graduated at Illinois College in 1881, and at Union College of Law, Chicago, in 1883. He practised in Jacksonville, Ill., from 1883 till 1887, then removed to Lincoln, Neb., and was elected to Congress as a Democrat, serving in 1891-95. In 1894-96 he was editor of the Omaha World-Herald, and in the latter year a delegate to the National Democratic Convention at Chicago. He there made a notable speech advocating the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the ratio of 16 to 1. The free-silver element in the convention was far stronger than the leaders of the party imagined, and there was as munch surprise in the convention as out of it when its prize, the Presidential nomination, was awarded to him. The Sound-money Democrats repudiated the nomination, organized the National Democratic party, and put forth a separate platform and national ticket. The Populists, however, adopted the Democratic n
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): entry bryan-william-jennings
our farms, and your cities will spring up again as if by magic; but destroy our farms, and the grass will grow in the streets of every city in the country. My friends, we declare that this nation is able to legislate for its own people on every question, without waiting for the aid or consent of any other nation on earth; and upon that issue we expect to carry every State in the Union. I shall rot slander the inhabitants of the fair State of Massachusetts nor the inhabitants of the State of New York by saying that, when they are confronted with the proposition, they will declare that this nation is not able to attend to its own business. It is the issue of 1776 over again. Our ancestors, when but 3,000,000 in number, had the courage to declare their political independence of every other nation; shall we, their descendants, when we have grown to 70.000,000, declare that we are less independent than our forefathers? No, my friends, that will never be the verdict of our people. T
United States (United States) (search for this): entry bryan-william-jennings
el of the 3d Nebraska Volunteer Infantry. Neither he nor his regiment saw fighting during the war, both William Jennings Bryan. being held in reserve in the United States, with other regiments, at Camp Onward, where he brought his regiment to a state of discipline and efficiency that was highly commended by experienced military ons. They tell us that the income tax ought not to be brought in here: that it is a new idea. They criticise us for our criticism of the Supreme Court of the United States. My friends, we lave not criticised; we have simply called attention to what you already know. If you want criticisms, read the dissenting opinions of the cos help us, we reply that, instead of having a gold standard because England has, we will restore bimetallism, and then let England have bimetallism because the United States has it. If they dare to come out in the open field and defend the gold standard as a good thing, we will fight them to the uttermost. Having behind us the pro
Jacksonville, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry bryan-william-jennings
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860- Politician; born in Salem, Ill., March 19, 1860; was graduated at Illinois College in 1881, and at Union College of Law, Chicago, in 1883. He practised in Jacksonville, Ill., from 1883 till 1887, then removed to Lincoln, Neb., and was elected to Congress as a Democrat, serving in 1891-95. In 1894-96 he was editor of the Omaha World-Herald, and in the latter year a delegate to the National Democratic Convention at Chicago. He there made a notable speech advocating the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the ratio of 16 to 1. The free-silver element in the convention was far stronger than the leaders of the party imagined, and there was as munch surprise in the convention as out of it when its prize, the Presidential nomination, was awarded to him. The Sound-money Democrats repudiated the nomination, organized the National Democratic party, and put forth a separate platform and national ticket. The Populists, however, adopted the Democratic no
1 2 3 4