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ands. A fine body of precedents for the authority of Parliament and the use of it! I admit it fully; and pray add likewise to these precedents that all the while Wales rid this kingdom like an incubus; that it was an unprofitable and oppressive burthen; and that an Englishman travelling in that country could not go six yards fromat. eight years after — that is, in the thirty-fifth of that reign — a complete and not ill-proportioned representation by counties and boroughs was bestowed upon Wales by act of Parliament. From this moment, as by a charm, the tumult subsided, obedience was restored, peace, order, and civilization followed in the train of libert palatine of Chester received the same relief from its oppression, and the same remedy to its disorders. Before this time Chester was little less distempered than Wales. The inhabitants, without rights themselves, were the fittest to destroy the rights of others: and from thence Richard II. drew the standing army of archers, wit
ed, and assented to, in the said court, in a manner prejudicial to the commonwealth, quietness, rest, and peace of the subjects inhabiting within the same. Is this description too hot, or too cold, too strong, or too weak? Does it arrogate too much to the supreme legislature? Does it lean too much to the claims of the people? If it runs into any of these errors, the fault is not mine. It is the language of your own ancient acts of Parliament. Non meus hic sermo, sed quae praecepit Ofellus, Rusticus, abnormis sapiens. [Ofellus shall set forth ('Twas he that taught me it, a shrewd clear wit, Though country-spun, and for the schools unfit).] It is the genuine produce of the ancient, rustic, manly, home-bred sense of this country. I did not care to rub off a particle of the venerable rust that rather adorns and preserves, than destroys, the metal. It would be a profanation to touch with a tool the stones which construct the sacred altar of peace. I would not violate wit
Joseph Lemuel Chester (search for this): entry burke-edmund
ilar case before me; those of Ireland, Wales, Chester, and Durham. Ireland, before the English c The very same year the county palatine of Chester received the same relief from its oppression,me remedy to its disorders. Before this time Chester was little less distempered than Wales. The nhabitants of your Grace's county palatine of Chester; That where the said county palatine of ChestChester is and hath been always hitherto exempt. excluded and separated out and from your high court ofemedy for superstition. Sir, this pattern of Chester was followed in the reign of Charles II. witlation. So scrupulously was the example of Chester followed, that the style of the preamble is nard to America; was it less perfect in Wales, Chester, and Durham? But America is virtually represles, which lies in your neighborhood; or than Chester and Durham, surrounded by abundance of represich was preserved entire, although Wales, and Chester, and Durham were added to it. Truly, Mr. Spea[1 more...]
the same end. What nature has disjoined in one way, wisdom may unite in another. When we cannot give the benefit as we would wish, let us not refuse it altogether. If we cannot give the principle, let us find a substitute. But how? Where? What substitute? Fortunately, I am not obliged for the ways and means of this substitute to tax my own unproductive invention. I am not even obliged to go to the rich treasury of the fertile framers of imaginary commonwealths: not to the Republic of Plato; not to the Utopia of More; not to the Oceana of Harrington. It is before me, it is at my feet, and the rude swain treads daily on it with his clouted shoon. I only wish you to recognize, for the theory, the ancient constitutional policy of tills kingdom with regard to representation, as that policy has been declared in acts of Parliament; and, as to the practice, to return to that mode which an uniform experience has marked out to you, as best; and in which you walked with security, advan
ssented to, in the said court, in a manner prejudicial to the commonwealth, quietness, rest, and peace of the subjects inhabiting within the same. Is this description too hot, or too cold, too strong, or too weak? Does it arrogate too much to the supreme legislature? Does it lean too much to the claims of the people? If it runs into any of these errors, the fault is not mine. It is the language of your own ancient acts of Parliament. Non meus hic sermo, sed quae praecepit Ofellus, Rusticus, abnormis sapiens. [Ofellus shall set forth ('Twas he that taught me it, a shrewd clear wit, Though country-spun, and for the schools unfit).] It is the genuine produce of the ancient, rustic, manly, home-bred sense of this country. I did not care to rub off a particle of the venerable rust that rather adorns and preserves, than destroys, the metal. It would be a profanation to touch with a tool the stones which construct the sacred altar of peace. I would not violate with modern p
Mark W. Harrington (search for this): entry burke-edmund
m may unite in another. When we cannot give the benefit as we would wish, let us not refuse it altogether. If we cannot give the principle, let us find a substitute. But how? Where? What substitute? Fortunately, I am not obliged for the ways and means of this substitute to tax my own unproductive invention. I am not even obliged to go to the rich treasury of the fertile framers of imaginary commonwealths: not to the Republic of Plato; not to the Utopia of More; not to the Oceana of Harrington. It is before me, it is at my feet, and the rude swain treads daily on it with his clouted shoon. I only wish you to recognize, for the theory, the ancient constitutional policy of tills kingdom with regard to representation, as that policy has been declared in acts of Parliament; and, as to the practice, to return to that mode which an uniform experience has marked out to you, as best; and in which you walked with security, advantage, and honour, until the year 1763. My resolutions,
James E. English (search for this): entry burke-edmund
as you prohibit by proclamation (with something more of doubt on the legality) the sending arms to America. They disarmed the Welsh by statute, as you attempted (but still with more question on the legality) to disarm New England by an instruction. They made an act to drag offenders from Wales to England for trial, as you have done (but with more hardship) with regard to America. By another act. where one of the parties was an Englishman, they ordained that his trial should be always by English. They made acts to restrain trade, as you do; and prevented the Welsh from the use of fairs and markets. as you do the Americans from fisheries and foreign ports. In short, when the statute-book was not quite so much swelled as it is now, you find no less than fifteen acts of penal regulation on the subject of Wales. Here we rub our hands. A fine body of precedents for the authority of Parliament and the use of it! I admit it fully; and pray add likewise to these precedents that all
Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 Statesman; born in Dublin, June 1, 1730; was one of fifteen children of Richard Burke, an attorney, and was descended from the Norman De Burghs, who early settled in Ireland; graduated at Trinity College, Dublin (1748); studied law, and in 1756 published his famous essay on The sublime and beautiful. That the colonies and plantations of Great Britain in North America, consisting of fourteen separate governments. and contaning 2,000,000 and upward of free Edmund Burke. inhabitants, have not had the liberty and privilege of electing and sending any knights and burgesses, or others, to represent them in the high court of Parlis to make the same more commodious to those who sue, or are sued, in the said courts; and to provide for the more decent maintenance of the judges of the same. Burke's speech on conciliation. I hope, sir, that, notwithstanding the austerity of the chair, your good-nature will incline you to some degree of indulgence towards
Taking a prominent part in the affairs in India, he began the prosecution of Gov. Warren Hastings early in 1786. His labors in behalf of India in that protracted trial were immense, though the conviction of Hastings was not effected. His great work entitled Reflections on the Revolution in France appeared in 1790. As a statesman and thinker and clear writer he had few superiors. His conversational powers were remarkable. and he was one of the suspected authors of the famous Letters of Junius. He died in Beaconsfield, England, July 9, 1797. Conciliation with the colonies. Burke's great conciliatory speech in the British Parliament, on March 22. 1775, was based on the following proposals which he had previously introduced: That the colonies and plantations of Great Britain in North America, consisting of fourteen separate governments. and contaning 2,000,000 and upward of free Edmund Burke. inhabitants, have not had the liberty and privilege of electing and sending an
Warren Hastings (search for this): entry burke-edmund
sing the trade of Ireland. During the brief administration of the Rockingham ministry in 1782, he was a member of the privy council and paymaster of the forces. Taking a prominent part in the affairs in India, he began the prosecution of Gov. Warren Hastings early in 1786. His labors in behalf of India in that protracted trial were immense, though the conviction of Hastings was not effected. His great work entitled Reflections on the Revolution in France appeared in 1790. As a statesman andHastings was not effected. His great work entitled Reflections on the Revolution in France appeared in 1790. As a statesman and thinker and clear writer he had few superiors. His conversational powers were remarkable. and he was one of the suspected authors of the famous Letters of Junius. He died in Beaconsfield, England, July 9, 1797. Conciliation with the colonies. Burke's great conciliatory speech in the British Parliament, on March 22. 1775, was based on the following proposals which he had previously introduced: That the colonies and plantations of Great Britain in North America, consisting of fourteen
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