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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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Lyman Judson Gage (search for this): entry burke-edmund
eputies sent to the colonies were lawyers. But all who read — and most do read — endeavour to obtain some smattering in that science. I have been told by an eminent bookseller, that in no branch of his business, after tracts of popular devotion, were so many books as those on the law exported to the plantations. The colonists have now fallen into the way of printing them for their own use. I hear that they have sold nearly as many of Blackstone's Commentaries in America as in England. General Gage marks out this disposition very particularly in a letter on your table. He states that all the people in his government are lawyers, or smatterers in law; and that in Boston they have been enabled, by successful chicane, wholly to evade many parts of one of your capital penal constitutions. The smartness of debate will say that this knowledge ought to teach them more clearly the rights of legislature, their obligations to obedience, and the penalties of rebellion. All this is mighty we
Richard Grenville (search for this): entry burke-edmund
t the Americans, who paid no taxes, should be compelled to contribute. How did that fact. of their paying nothing, stand, when the taxing system began? When Mr. Grenville began to form his system of American revenue. he stated in this House. that the colonies were then in debt £ 2.600,000 sterling money: and was of opinion thehat debt in four years. On this state, those untaxed people were actually subject to the payment of taxes to the amount of £ 650,000 a year. In fact, however, Mr. Grenville was mistaken. The funds given for sinking the old debt did not prove quite so ample as both the colonies and he expected. The calculation was too sanguine: tand inconclusive inferences, drawn from them, are not mine; for I heartily disclaim any such inference. I have chosen the words of an act of Parliament, which Mr. Grenville, surely a tolerably zealous and very judicious advocate for the sovereignty of Parliament, formally moved to have read at your table in confirmation of his ten
in the grant. Now if the doctrines of policy contained in these preambles. and the force of these examples in the acts of Parliament, avail anything. what can be said against applying them with regard to America? Are not the people of America as much Englishmen as the Welsh? The preamble of the act of Henry VIII. says, the Welsh speak a language no way resembling that of his Majesty's English subjects. Are the Americans not as numerous? If we may trust the learned and accurate Judge Barrington's account of North Wales, and take that as a standard to measure the rest, there is no comparison. The people cannot amount to above 200,000; not a tenth part of the number in the colonies. Is America in rebellion? Wales was hardly ever free from it. Have you attempted to govern America by penal statutes? You made fifteen to Wales. But your legislative authority is perfect with regard to America; was it less perfect in Wales, Chester, and Durham? But America is virtually represent
January 28th, 1756 AD (search for this): entry burke-edmund
ved, That it is the opinion of this committee, that it is just and reasonable that the several provinces and colonies of Massachusetts Bay, New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Rhode Island be reimbursed the expenses that they have been at in taking and securing to the Crown of Great Britain the Island of Cape Breton and its dependencies. These expenses were immense for such colonies. They were above £ 200,000 sterling: money first raised and advanced on their public credit. On the 28th of January, 1756, a message from the king came to us, to this effect: His Majesty, being sensible of the zeal and vigour with which his faithful subjects of certain colonies in North America have exerted themselves in defence of his Majesty's just rights and possessions. recommends it to this House to take the same into their consideration, and to enable his Majesty to give them such assistance as may be a proper reward and encouragement. On the 3d of February, 1756, the House came to a suitable r
March 17th, 1763 AD (search for this): entry burke-edmund
money then voted was as an encouragement to the colonies to exert themselves with vigour. It will not be necessary to go through all the testimonies which your own records have given to the truth of my resolutions; I will only refer you to the places in the journals: Vol. XXVII.--16th and 19th May, 1757. Vol. XXVIII.--June 1st, 1758--April 26th and 30th, 1759--March 26th and 31st, and April 28th, 1760--Jan. 9th and 20th, 1761. Vol. XXIX.--Jan. 22d and 26th, 1762--March 14th and 17th, 1763. Sir, here is the repeated acknowledgment of Parliament, that the colonies not only gave, but gave to satiety. This nation has formally acknowledged two things; first, that the colonies had gone beyond their abilities, Parliament having thought it necessary to reimburse them; secondly, that they had acted legally and laudably in their grants of money, and their maintenance of troops. since the compensation is expressly given as reward and encouragement. Reward is not bestowed for act
April 28th, 1760 AD (search for this): entry burke-edmund
ressed in words nearly the same as those of the message; but with the further addition, that the money then voted was as an encouragement to the colonies to exert themselves with vigour. It will not be necessary to go through all the testimonies which your own records have given to the truth of my resolutions; I will only refer you to the places in the journals: Vol. XXVII.--16th and 19th May, 1757. Vol. XXVIII.--June 1st, 1758--April 26th and 30th, 1759--March 26th and 31st, and April 28th, 1760--Jan. 9th and 20th, 1761. Vol. XXIX.--Jan. 22d and 26th, 1762--March 14th and 17th, 1763. Sir, here is the repeated acknowledgment of Parliament, that the colonies not only gave, but gave to satiety. This nation has formally acknowledged two things; first, that the colonies had gone beyond their abilities, Parliament having thought it necessary to reimburse them; secondly, that they had acted legally and laudably in their grants of money, and their maintenance of troops. since
March 14th, 1763 AD (search for this): entry burke-edmund
tion, that the money then voted was as an encouragement to the colonies to exert themselves with vigour. It will not be necessary to go through all the testimonies which your own records have given to the truth of my resolutions; I will only refer you to the places in the journals: Vol. XXVII.--16th and 19th May, 1757. Vol. XXVIII.--June 1st, 1758--April 26th and 30th, 1759--March 26th and 31st, and April 28th, 1760--Jan. 9th and 20th, 1761. Vol. XXIX.--Jan. 22d and 26th, 1762--March 14th and 17th, 1763. Sir, here is the repeated acknowledgment of Parliament, that the colonies not only gave, but gave to satiety. This nation has formally acknowledged two things; first, that the colonies had gone beyond their abilities, Parliament having thought it necessary to reimburse them; secondly, that they had acted legally and laudably in their grants of money, and their maintenance of troops. since the compensation is expressly given as reward and encouragement. Reward is not b
Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 Statesman; born in Dublin, June 1, 1730; was one of fifteen children of Richard Burke, an attorney, and was descended from the Norman De Burghs, who early settled in Ireland; graduated at Trinity College, Dublin (1748); studied law, and in 1756 published his famous essay on The sublime and beautiful. In 1758-59 he and Dodsley established the Annual Registor; and in 1765 he was made secretary to Premier Rockingham. He entered Parliament in 1766. There he took an active and brilliant part in debates on the American question, and always in favor of the Americans. advocating their cause with rare eloquence. In 1771 he was appointed agent for the colony of New York. He lost some popularity by advocating the claims of the Roman Catholics in 1780, and opposing the policy of repressing the trade of Ireland. During the brief administration of the Rockingham ministry in 1782, he was a member of the privy council and paymaster of the forces. Taking a prominen
July 9th, 1797 AD (search for this): entry burke-edmund
dia, he began the prosecution of Gov. Warren Hastings early in 1786. His labors in behalf of India in that protracted trial were immense, though the conviction of Hastings was not effected. His great work entitled Reflections on the Revolution in France appeared in 1790. As a statesman and thinker and clear writer he had few superiors. His conversational powers were remarkable. and he was one of the suspected authors of the famous Letters of Junius. He died in Beaconsfield, England, July 9, 1797. Conciliation with the colonies. Burke's great conciliatory speech in the British Parliament, on March 22. 1775, was based on the following proposals which he had previously introduced: That the colonies and plantations of Great Britain in North America, consisting of fourteen separate governments. and contaning 2,000,000 and upward of free Edmund Burke. inhabitants, have not had the liberty and privilege of electing and sending any knights and burgesses, or others, to represe
January 22nd, 1762 AD (search for this): entry burke-edmund
but with the further addition, that the money then voted was as an encouragement to the colonies to exert themselves with vigour. It will not be necessary to go through all the testimonies which your own records have given to the truth of my resolutions; I will only refer you to the places in the journals: Vol. XXVII.--16th and 19th May, 1757. Vol. XXVIII.--June 1st, 1758--April 26th and 30th, 1759--March 26th and 31st, and April 28th, 1760--Jan. 9th and 20th, 1761. Vol. XXIX.--Jan. 22d and 26th, 1762--March 14th and 17th, 1763. Sir, here is the repeated acknowledgment of Parliament, that the colonies not only gave, but gave to satiety. This nation has formally acknowledged two things; first, that the colonies had gone beyond their abilities, Parliament having thought it necessary to reimburse them; secondly, that they had acted legally and laudably in their grants of money, and their maintenance of troops. since the compensation is expressly given as reward and encou
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