hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 553 total hits in 94 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry burke-edmund
ial. Pursuing the same plan of punishing by the denial of the exercise of government to still greater lengths, we wholly abrogated the ancient government of Massachusetts. We were confident that the first feeling, if not the very prospect of anarchy, would instantly enforce a complete submission. The experiment was tried. A n Ideas of prudence and accommodation to circumstances prevent you from taking away the charters of Connecticut and Rhode Island, as you have taken away that of Massachusetts colony, though the crown has far less power in the two former provinces than it enjoys in the latter; and though the abuses have been full as great, and as flame reasons of prudence and accommodation have weight with me in restoring the charter of Massachusetts Bay. Besides, sir, the act which changes the charter of Massachusetts is in many particulars so exceptionable. that if I did not wish absolutely to repeal, I would by all means desire to alter it; as several of its provisions te
Dublin (Irish Republic) (search for this): entry burke-edmund
Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 Statesman; born in Dublin, June 1, 1730; was one of fifteen children of Richard Burke, an attorney, and was descended from the Norman De Burghs, who early settled in Ireland; graduated at Trinity College, Dublin (1748); studied law, and in 1756 published his famous essay on The sublime and beautiful. In 1758-59 he and Dodsley established the Annual Registor; and in 1765 he was made secretary to Premier Rockingham. He entered Parliament in 1766. There he took an aDublin (1748); studied law, and in 1756 published his famous essay on The sublime and beautiful. In 1758-59 he and Dodsley established the Annual Registor; and in 1765 he was made secretary to Premier Rockingham. He entered Parliament in 1766. There he took an active and brilliant part in debates on the American question, and always in favor of the Americans. advocating their cause with rare eloquence. In 1771 he was appointed agent for the colony of New York. He lost some popularity by advocating the claims of the Roman Catholics in 1780, and opposing the policy of repressing the trade of Ireland. During the brief administration of the Rockingham ministry in 1782, he was a member of the privy council and paymaster of the forces. Taking a prominen
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry burke-edmund
y are, one trade. The trade to the colonies, taken on the export side, at the beginning of this century — that is, in the year 1704--stood thus: Exports to North America and the West Indies£483,265 To Africa86,665    £569,930   In the year 1772, which I take as a middle year between the highest and lowest of those lately laid on your table, the account was as follows: To North America and the West Indies£4,791,734 To Africa866,398 To which if you add the export trade from Scotland, which had in 1704 no existence364,000    £6,022,132   From five hundred and odd thousand, it has grown to six millions. It has increased no less than twelvefold. This is the state of the colony trade, as compared with itself at these two periods, within this century — and this is matter for meditation. But this is not all. Examine my second account. See how the export trade to the colonies alone in 1772 stood in the other point of view, that is, as compared to the whole t
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry burke-edmund
a committee of this House came to the following resolution: Resolved, That it is the opinion of this committee, that it is just and reasonable that the several provinces and colonies of Massachusetts Bay, New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Rhode Island be reimbursed the expenses that they have been at in taking and securing to the Crown of Great Britain the Island of Cape Breton and its dependencies. These expenses were immense for such colonies. They were above £ 200,000 sterling: moneyhing, induced me, who mean not to chastise, but to reconcile, to be satisfied with the punishment already partially inflicted. Ideas of prudence and accommodation to circumstances prevent you from taking away the charters of Connecticut and Rhode Island, as you have taken away that of Massachusetts colony, though the crown has far less power in the two former provinces than it enjoys in the latter; and though the abuses have been full as great, and as flagrant, in the exempted as in the punis
Beaconsfield (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry burke-edmund
the affairs in India, he began the prosecution of Gov. Warren Hastings early in 1786. His labors in behalf of India in that protracted trial were immense, though the conviction of Hastings was not effected. His great work entitled Reflections on the Revolution in France appeared in 1790. As a statesman and thinker and clear writer he had few superiors. His conversational powers were remarkable. and he was one of the suspected authors of the famous Letters of Junius. He died in Beaconsfield, England, July 9, 1797. Conciliation with the colonies. Burke's great conciliatory speech in the British Parliament, on March 22. 1775, was based on the following proposals which he had previously introduced: That the colonies and plantations of Great Britain in North America, consisting of fourteen separate governments. and contaning 2,000,000 and upward of free Edmund Burke. inhabitants, have not had the liberty and privilege of electing and sending any knights and burgesses, or
r than arrant trifling. I shall therefore endeavour, with your leave, to lay before you some of the most material of these circumstances in as full and as clear a manner as I am able to state them. The first thing that we have to consider with regard to the nature of the object is — the number of people in the colonies. I have taken for some years a good deal of pains on that point. I can by no calculation justify myself in placing the number below 2,000,000 of inhabitants of our own European blood and colour; besides at least 500,000 others, who form no inconsiderable part of the strength and opulence of the whole. This, sir, is, I believe, about the true number. There is no occasion to exaggerate, where plain truth is of so much weight and importance. But whether I put the present number too high or too low is a matter of little moment. Such is the strength with which population shoots in that part of the world that, state the numbers as high as we will, whilst the dispute
lonies and plantations of Great Britain in North America, consisting of fourteen separate governmen, in the province of Massachusetts Bay, in North America. That it may be proper to repeal an actral court, of any colony or plantation, in North America, shall have appointed, by act of assembly n the year 1704--stood thus: Exports to North America and the West Indies£483,265 To Africa86,6r table, the account was as follows: To North America and the West Indies£4,791,734 To Africa86lonies and plantations of Great Britain in North America, consisting of fourteen separate governmens faithful subjects of certain colonies in North America have exerted themselves in defence of his , in the province of Massachusetts Bay, in North America.--And that it may be proper to repeal an aneral court of any colony or plantation in North America, shall have appointed by act of assembly, en in imposition, what can you expect from North America? For certainly, if ever there was a count[1 more...]
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry burke-edmund
erate and healing counsels) was to be made Great Britain, he should see his son. Lord Chancellor ofnow attracts the envy of the world. Whatever England has been growing to by a progressive increasenhappily meeting with an exercise of power in England, which, however lawful, is not reconcilable tbe assured that a form of parliament, such as England then enjoyed, she instantly communicated to Is not looked upon as any part of the realm of England. Its old constitution, whatever that might hy made an act to drag offenders from Wales to England for trial, as you have done (but with more hating murder under the orders of government to England for trial is but temporary. That act has cals this notion of simple and undivided unity. England is the head; but she is not the head and membtur area (The chest is staked). Cannot you in England, cannot you at this time of day, cannot you, his country? Is this principle to be true in England and false everywhere else? Is it not true in[30 more...]
Chester (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry burke-edmund
he storm-cloud flies, The threatening billow on the deep Obedient lies.) The very same year the county palatine of Chester received the same relief from its oppression, and the same remedy to its disorders. Before this time Chester was little less distempered than Wales. The inhabitants, without rights themselves, were the fittest to destroy the rights of others: and from thence Richard II. drew the standing army of archers, with which for a time he oppressed England. The people of Chester applied to Parliament in a petition penned as I shall read to you: To the king our sovereign lord, in most humble wise shown unto your excellent Majesty, the inhabitants of your Grace's county palatine of Chester; That where the said county palatine of Chester is and hath been always hitherto exempt. excluded and separated out and from your high court of Parliament, to have any knights and burgesses within the said court; by reason whereof the said inhabitants have hitherto sustained
Blackstone (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry burke-edmund
inces it takes the lead. The greater number of the deputies sent to the colonies were lawyers. But all who read — and most do read — endeavour to obtain some smattering in that science. I have been told by an eminent bookseller, that in no branch of his business, after tracts of popular devotion, were so many books as those on the law exported to the plantations. The colonists have now fallen into the way of printing them for their own use. I hear that they have sold nearly as many of Blackstone's Commentaries in America as in England. General Gage marks out this disposition very particularly in a letter on your table. He states that all the people in his government are lawyers, or smatterers in law; and that in Boston they have been enabled, by successful chicane, wholly to evade many parts of one of your capital penal constitutions. The smartness of debate will say that this knowledge ought to teach them more clearly the rights of legislature, their obligations to obedience, a
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...