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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry burnside-ambrose-everett
erved in the campaign in Maryland under McClellan, and was in the battles at South Mountain and Antietam. On Nov. 7, 1862, he superseded McClellan in command of the Army of the Potomac. Failing of success in his attack upon Lee at Fredericksburg (December, 1862), he resigned, and was succeeded by General Hooker in January, 1863. Assigned to the command of the Department of the Ohio in May, he was active there in suppressing the disloyal elements in that region. In the fall he freed eastern Tennessee of Confederate domination, where he fought Longstreet. He was in command of his old corps (the 9th) in Grant's campaign against Richmond in 1864-65, where he performed important work. He resigned April 15, 1865. In 1866 he was elected governor of Rhode Island, and was twice re-elected. Being in Europe in the fall of 1870, he was admitted within the German and French lines around Paris, and ineffectually endeavored to mediate between the belligerents. He was elected to the United S
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry burnside-ambrose-everett
esigned in 1853; established a manufactory of breech-loading rifles (his own invention) in Rhode Island; and was an officer of the Illinois Central Railroad Ambrose Everett Burnside. Company when the Civil War began. He went into that conflict as colonel of the 1st Rhode Island Volunteers. For good service at the battle of Bull Run he was made (Aug. 6, 1861) major-general of volunteers. He commanded the expedition that captured Roanoke Island (q. v.) in February, 1862; also Newbern and Beaufort. He was called to Virginia after the close of the campaign on the Peninsula, and was active and skilful as a corps commander in many of the most important military events of the war. General Burnside served in the campaign in Maryland under McClellan, and was in the battles at South Mountain and Antietam. On Nov. 7, 1862, he superseded McClellan in command of the Army of the Potomac. Failing of success in his attack upon Lee at Fredericksburg (December, 1862), he resigned, and was succee
and Antietam. On Nov. 7, 1862, he superseded McClellan in command of the Army of the Potomac. Failing of success in his attack upon Lee at Fredericksburg (December, 1862), he resigned, and was succeeded by General Hooker in January, 1863. Assigned to the command of the Department of the Ohio in May, he was active there in suppressing the disloyal elements in that region. In the fall he freed eastern Tennessee of Confederate domination, where he fought Longstreet. He was in command of his old corps (the 9th) in Grant's campaign against Richmond in 1864-65, where he performed important work. He resigned April 15, 1865. In 1866 he was elected governor of Rhode Island, and was twice re-elected. Being in Europe in the fall of 1870, he was admitted within the German and French lines around Paris, and ineffectually endeavored to mediate between the belligerents. He was elected to the United States Senate in 1875, and was re-elected in 1880. He died in Bristol, R. I., Sept. 3, 1881.
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry burnside-ambrose-everett
n 1850-51; resigned in 1853; established a manufactory of breech-loading rifles (his own invention) in Rhode Island; and was an officer of the Illinois Central Railroad Ambrose Everett Burnside. Company when the Civil War began. He went into that conflict as colonel of the 1st Rhode Island Volunteers. For good service at the battle of Bull Run he was made (Aug. 6, 1861) major-general of volunteers. He commanded the expedition that captured Roanoke Island (q. v.) in February, 1862; also Newbern and Beaufort. He was called to Virginia after the close of the campaign on the Peninsula, and was active and skilful as a corps commander in many of the most important military events of the war. General Burnside served in the campaign in Maryland under McClellan, and was in the battles at South Mountain and Antietam. On Nov. 7, 1862, he superseded McClellan in command of the Army of the Potomac. Failing of success in his attack upon Lee at Fredericksburg (December, 1862), he resigned, a
South Mountain, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry burnside-ambrose-everett
s. For good service at the battle of Bull Run he was made (Aug. 6, 1861) major-general of volunteers. He commanded the expedition that captured Roanoke Island (q. v.) in February, 1862; also Newbern and Beaufort. He was called to Virginia after the close of the campaign on the Peninsula, and was active and skilful as a corps commander in many of the most important military events of the war. General Burnside served in the campaign in Maryland under McClellan, and was in the battles at South Mountain and Antietam. On Nov. 7, 1862, he superseded McClellan in command of the Army of the Potomac. Failing of success in his attack upon Lee at Fredericksburg (December, 1862), he resigned, and was succeeded by General Hooker in January, 1863. Assigned to the command of the Department of the Ohio in May, he was active there in suppressing the disloyal elements in that region. In the fall he freed eastern Tennessee of Confederate domination, where he fought Longstreet. He was in command o
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry burnside-ambrose-everett
Burnside, Ambrose Everett, 1824-1881 Military officer; born in Liberty, Ind., May 23, 1824; was graduated at West Point in 1847, and, as a member of a corps of artillery, accompanied General Patterson to Mexico the same year. Afterwards he was in charge of a squadron of cavalry in New Mexico; was quartermaster of the Mexican Boundary Commission in 1850-51; resigned in 1853; established a manufactory of breech-loading rifles (his own invention) in Rhode Island; and was an officer of the Illinois Central Railroad Ambrose Everett Burnside. Company when the Civil War began. He went into that conflict as colonel of the 1st Rhode Island Volunteers. For good service at the battle of Bull Run he was made (Aug. 6, 1861) major-general of volunteers. He commanded the expedition that captured Roanoke Island (q. v.) in February, 1862; also Newbern and Beaufort. He was called to Virginia after the close of the campaign on the Peninsula, and was active and skilful as a corps commander in
West Point (New York, United States) (search for this): entry burnside-ambrose-everett
Burnside, Ambrose Everett, 1824-1881 Military officer; born in Liberty, Ind., May 23, 1824; was graduated at West Point in 1847, and, as a member of a corps of artillery, accompanied General Patterson to Mexico the same year. Afterwards he was in charge of a squadron of cavalry in New Mexico; was quartermaster of the Mexican Boundary Commission in 1850-51; resigned in 1853; established a manufactory of breech-loading rifles (his own invention) in Rhode Island; and was an officer of the Illinois Central Railroad Ambrose Everett Burnside. Company when the Civil War began. He went into that conflict as colonel of the 1st Rhode Island Volunteers. For good service at the battle of Bull Run he was made (Aug. 6, 1861) major-general of volunteers. He commanded the expedition that captured Roanoke Island (q. v.) in February, 1862; also Newbern and Beaufort. He was called to Virginia after the close of the campaign on the Peninsula, and was active and skilful as a corps commander in
Bristol, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry burnside-ambrose-everett
and Antietam. On Nov. 7, 1862, he superseded McClellan in command of the Army of the Potomac. Failing of success in his attack upon Lee at Fredericksburg (December, 1862), he resigned, and was succeeded by General Hooker in January, 1863. Assigned to the command of the Department of the Ohio in May, he was active there in suppressing the disloyal elements in that region. In the fall he freed eastern Tennessee of Confederate domination, where he fought Longstreet. He was in command of his old corps (the 9th) in Grant's campaign against Richmond in 1864-65, where he performed important work. He resigned April 15, 1865. In 1866 he was elected governor of Rhode Island, and was twice re-elected. Being in Europe in the fall of 1870, he was admitted within the German and French lines around Paris, and ineffectually endeavored to mediate between the belligerents. He was elected to the United States Senate in 1875, and was re-elected in 1880. He died in Bristol, R. I., Sept. 3, 1881.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry burnside-ambrose-everett
t conflict as colonel of the 1st Rhode Island Volunteers. For good service at the battle of Bull Run he was made (Aug. 6, 1861) major-general of volunteers. He commanded the expedition that captured Roanoke Island (q. v.) in February, 1862; also Newbern and Beaufort. He was called to Virginia after the close of the campaign on the Peninsula, and was active and skilful as a corps commander in many of the most important military events of the war. General Burnside served in the campaign in Maryland under McClellan, and was in the battles at South Mountain and Antietam. On Nov. 7, 1862, he superseded McClellan in command of the Army of the Potomac. Failing of success in his attack upon Lee at Fredericksburg (December, 1862), he resigned, and was succeeded by General Hooker in January, 1863. Assigned to the command of the Department of the Ohio in May, he was active there in suppressing the disloyal elements in that region. In the fall he freed eastern Tennessee of Confederate domin
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): entry burnside-ambrose-everett
Burnside, Ambrose Everett, 1824-1881 Military officer; born in Liberty, Ind., May 23, 1824; was graduated at West Point in 1847, and, as a member of a corps of artillery, accompanied General Patterson to Mexico the same year. Afterwards he was in charge of a squadron of cavalry in New Mexico; was quartermaster of the Mexican Boundary Commission in 1850-51; resigned in 1853; established a manufactory of breech-loading rifles (his own invention) in Rhode Island; and was an officer of the Illinois Central Railroad Ambrose Everett Burnside. Company when the Civil War began. He went into that conflict as colonel of the 1st Rhode Island Volunteers. For good service at the battle of Bull Run he was made (Aug. 6, 1861) major-general of volunteers. He commanded the expedition that captured Roanoke Island (q. v.) in February, 1862; also Newbern and Beaufort. He was called to Virginia after the close of the campaign on the Peninsula, and was active and skilful as a corps commander in
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