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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 30 total hits in 9 results.

Ohio (United States) (search for this): entry cairo-occupation-of
Cairo, occupation of The city of Cairo, Ill. (population, 1900, 12,566), is situated near the extremity of a boatshaped peninsula, at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 175 miles below St. Louis. It is a point of great importance as the key to a vast extent of navigable waters, and to it National troops were sent at an early period in the Civil War. Both the national government and Governor Yates, of Illinois, had been apprised of the intention of the Confederates to secure that position, hoping thereby to control the navigation of the Mississippi to St. Louis, and of the Ohio to Cincinnati and beyond. They also hoped that the absolute control of the Mississippi below would cause the Northwestern States to join hands with the Confederates rather than lose these great trade advantages. The scheme was foiled. Governor Yates, under the direction of the Secretary of War, sent Illinois troops at an early day to take possession of and occupy Cairo. By the middle of
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry cairo-occupation-of
Cairo, occupation of The city of Cairo, Ill. (population, 1900, 12,566), is situated near the extremity of a boatshaped peninsula, at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 175 miles below St. Louis. It is a point of great importance as the key to a vast extent of navigable waters, and to it National troops were sCairo, Ill. (population, 1900, 12,566), is situated near the extremity of a boatshaped peninsula, at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 175 miles below St. Louis. It is a point of great importance as the key to a vast extent of navigable waters, and to it National troops were sent at an early period in the Civil War. Both the national government and Governor Yates, of Illinois, had been apprised of the intention of the Confederates to secure that position, hoping thereby to control the navigation of the Mississippi to St. Louis, and of the Ohio to Cincinnati and beyond. They also hoped that the absolutentages. The scheme was foiled. Governor Yates, under the direction of the Secretary of War, sent Illinois troops at an early day to take possession of and occupy Cairo. By the middle of May there were not less than 5,000 Union volunteers there, under the command of Gen. B. M. Prentiss, who occupied the extreme point of the penin
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry cairo-occupation-of
boatshaped peninsula, at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 175 miles below St. Louis. It is a point of great importance as the key to a vast extent of navigable waters, and to it National troops were sent at an early period in the Civil War. Both the national government and Governor Yates, of Illinois, had been apprised of the intention of the Confederates to secure that position, hoping thereby to control the navigation of the Mississippi to St. Louis, and of the Ohio to Cincinnati and beyond. They also hoped that the absolute control of the Mississippi below would cause the Northwestern States to join hands with the Confederates rather than lose these great trade advantages. The scheme was foiled. Governor Yates, under the direction of the Secretary of War, sent Illinois troops at an early day to take possession of and occupy Cairo. By the middle of May there were not less than 5,000 Union volunteers there, under the command of Gen. B. M. Prentiss, who occupied
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry cairo-occupation-of
i rivers, 175 miles below St. Louis. It is a point of great importance as the key to a vast extent of navigable waters, and to it National troops were sent at an early period in the Civil War. Both the national government and Governor Yates, of Illinois, had been apprised of the intention of the Confederates to secure that position, hoping thereby to control the navigation of the Mississippi to St. Louis, and of the Ohio to Cincinnati and beyond. They also hoped that the absolute control of the Mississippi below would cause the Northwestern States to join hands with the Confederates rather than lose these great trade advantages. The scheme was foiled. Governor Yates, under the direction of the Secretary of War, sent Illinois troops at an early day to take possession of and occupy Cairo. By the middle of May there were not less than 5,000 Union volunteers there, under the command of Gen. B. M. Prentiss, who occupied the extreme point of the peninsula, where they cast up fortificati
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): entry cairo-occupation-of
Cairo, occupation of The city of Cairo, Ill. (population, 1900, 12,566), is situated near the extremity of a boatshaped peninsula, at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 175 miles below St. Louis. It is a point of great importance as the key to a vast extent of navigable waters, and to it National troops were sent at an early period in the Civil War. Both the national government and Governor Yates, of Illinois, had been apprised of the intention of the Confederates to secure that position, hoping thereby to control the navigation of the Mississippi to St. Louis, and of the Ohio to Cincinnati and beyond. They also hoped that the absolute control of the Mississippi below would cause the Northwestern States to join hands with the Confederates rather than lose these great trade advantages. The scheme was foiled. Governor Yates, under the direction of the Secretary of War, sent Illinois troops at an early day to take possession of and occupy Cairo. By the middle of
Benjamin Mayberry Prentiss (search for this): entry cairo-occupation-of
hat position, hoping thereby to control the navigation of the Mississippi to St. Louis, and of the Ohio to Cincinnati and beyond. They also hoped that the absolute control of the Mississippi below would cause the Northwestern States to join hands with the Confederates rather than lose these great trade advantages. The scheme was foiled. Governor Yates, under the direction of the Secretary of War, sent Illinois troops at an early day to take possession of and occupy Cairo. By the middle of May there were not less than 5,000 Union volunteers there, under the command of Gen. B. M. Prentiss, who occupied the extreme point of the peninsula, where they cast up fortifications and gave the post the name of Camp Defiance. Before the close of May it was considered impregnable against any force the Confederates might send. It soon became a post of great importance to the Union cause as the place where some of the land and naval expeditions in the valley of the Mississippi were fitted out.
o and Mississippi rivers, 175 miles below St. Louis. It is a point of great importance as the key to a vast extent of navigable waters, and to it National troops were sent at an early period in the Civil War. Both the national government and Governor Yates, of Illinois, had been apprised of the intention of the Confederates to secure that position, hoping thereby to control the navigation of the Mississippi to St. Louis, and of the Ohio to Cincinnati and beyond. They also hoped that the absolute control of the Mississippi below would cause the Northwestern States to join hands with the Confederates rather than lose these great trade advantages. The scheme was foiled. Governor Yates, under the direction of the Secretary of War, sent Illinois troops at an early day to take possession of and occupy Cairo. By the middle of May there were not less than 5,000 Union volunteers there, under the command of Gen. B. M. Prentiss, who occupied the extreme point of the peninsula, where they cas
th the Confederates rather than lose these great trade advantages. The scheme was foiled. Governor Yates, under the direction of the Secretary of War, sent Illinois troops at an early day to take possession of and occupy Cairo. By the middle of May there were not less than 5,000 Union volunteers there, under the command of Gen. B. M. Prentiss, who occupied the extreme point of the peninsula, where they cast up fortifications and gave the post the name of Camp Defiance. Before the close of My there were not less than 5,000 Union volunteers there, under the command of Gen. B. M. Prentiss, who occupied the extreme point of the peninsula, where they cast up fortifications and gave the post the name of Camp Defiance. Before the close of May it was considered impregnable against any force the Confederates might send. It soon became a post of great importance to the Union cause as the place where some of the land and naval expeditions in the valley of the Mississippi were fitted out.
Cairo, occupation of The city of Cairo, Ill. (population, 1900, 12,566), is situated near the extremity of a boatshaped peninsula, at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 175 miles below St. Louis. It is a point of great importance as the key to a vast extent of navigable waters, and to it National troops were sent at an early period in the Civil War. Both the national government and Governor Yates, of Illinois, had been apprised of the intention of the Confederates to secure that position, hoping thereby to control the navigation of the Mississippi to St. Louis, and of the Ohio to Cincinnati and beyond. They also hoped that the absolute control of the Mississippi below would cause the Northwestern States to join hands with the Confederates rather than lose these great trade advantages. The scheme was foiled. Governor Yates, under the direction of the Secretary of War, sent Illinois troops at an early day to take possession of and occupy Cairo. By the middle of