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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 35 total hits in 18 results.

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Castine, Vincent, Baron De 1665- Military officer; born in Orleans, France; a scion of a noble family. At the age of Remains of Fort Castine. seventeen years, he was colonel of the King's body-guard, and when the regiment to which he belonged was sent to Canada (1665) he went with it and remained after it was disbanded. In 1667 he established a trading-post and built a fort at or near the mouth of the Penobscot River, and married the daughter of a Penobscot chief. By him Christianity was first introduced among the natives of that region. He gained great influence over them. During his absence in 1688, his establishment was pillaged by the English, and he became their bitter foe. He taught the Indians around him the use of fire-arms, and he frequently co-operated with them in their attacks on the northeastern frontier. In 1696, with 200 Indians, he assisted Iberville in the capture of the fort at Pemaquid. In 1706-7 he assisted in the defence of Port Royal, and was wound
Castine, Vincent, Baron De 1665- Military officer; born in Orleans, France; a scion of a noble family. At the age of Remains of Fort Castine. seventeen years, he was colonel of the King's body-guard, and when the regiment to which he belonged was sent to Canada (1665) he went with it and remained after it was disbanded. In 1667 he established a trading-post and built a fort at or near the mouth of the Penobscot River, and married the daughter of a Penobscot chief. By him Christianity was first introduced among the natives of that region. He gained great influence over them. During his absence in 1688, his establishment was pillaged by the English, and he became their bitter foe. He taught the Indians around him the use of fire-arms, and he frequently co-operated with them in their attacks on the northeastern frontier. In 1696, with 200 Indians, he assisted Iberville in the capture of the fort at Pemaquid. In 1706-7 he assisted in the defence of Port Royal, and was wounde
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry castine-vincent-baron-de
By him Christianity was first introduced among the natives of that region. He gained great influence over them. During his absence in 1688, his establishment was pillaged by the English, and he became their bitter foe. He taught the Indians around him the use of fire-arms, and he frequently co-operated with them in their attacks on the northeastern frontier. In 1696, with 200 Indians, he assisted Iberville in the capture of the fort at Pemaquid. In 1706-7 he assisted in the defence of Port Royal, and was wounded. He lived in America thirty years, when he returned to France, leaving Fort Castine and the domain around it to his half-breed son and successor in title. The young baron was really a friend to the English, but, being at the head of the Penobscot Indians, and suspected of being an enemy, he was surprised and captured in 1721,. taken to Boston, and imprisoned several months. His name is perpetuated in the town of Castine, at which place slight traces of his fort are yet
Castine (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry castine-vincent-baron-de
ristianity was first introduced among the natives of that region. He gained great influence over them. During his absence in 1688, his establishment was pillaged by the English, and he became their bitter foe. He taught the Indians around him the use of fire-arms, and he frequently co-operated with them in their attacks on the northeastern frontier. In 1696, with 200 Indians, he assisted Iberville in the capture of the fort at Pemaquid. In 1706-7 he assisted in the defence of Port Royal, and was wounded. He lived in America thirty years, when he returned to France, leaving Fort Castine and the domain around it to his half-breed son and successor in title. The young baron was really a friend to the English, but, being at the head of the Penobscot Indians, and suspected of being an enemy, he was surprised and captured in 1721,. taken to Boston, and imprisoned several months. His name is perpetuated in the town of Castine, at which place slight traces of his fort are yet visible.
Penobscot (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry castine-vincent-baron-de
Castine, Vincent, Baron De 1665- Military officer; born in Orleans, France; a scion of a noble family. At the age of Remains of Fort Castine. seventeen years, he was colonel of the King's body-guard, and when the regiment to which he belonged was sent to Canada (1665) he went with it and remained after it was disbanded. In 1667 he established a trading-post and built a fort at or near the mouth of the Penobscot River, and married the daughter of a Penobscot chief. By him Christianity was first introduced among the natives of that region. He gained great influence over them. During his absence in 1688, his establishment was pillaged by the English, and he became their bitter foe. He taught the Indians around him the use of fire-arms, and he frequently co-operated with them in their attacks on the northeastern frontier. In 1696, with 200 Indians, he assisted Iberville in the capture of the fort at Pemaquid. In 1706-7 he assisted in the defence of Port Royal, and was wound
hristianity was first introduced among the natives of that region. He gained great influence over them. During his absence in 1688, his establishment was pillaged by the English, and he became their bitter foe. He taught the Indians around him the use of fire-arms, and he frequently co-operated with them in their attacks on the northeastern frontier. In 1696, with 200 Indians, he assisted Iberville in the capture of the fort at Pemaquid. In 1706-7 he assisted in the defence of Port Royal, and was wounded. He lived in America thirty years, when he returned to France, leaving Fort Castine and the domain around it to his half-breed son and successor in title. The young baron was really a friend to the English, but, being at the head of the Penobscot Indians, and suspected of being an enemy, he was surprised and captured in 1721,. taken to Boston, and imprisoned several months. His name is perpetuated in the town of Castine, at which place slight traces of his fort are yet visible.
Pemaquid (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry castine-vincent-baron-de
er, and married the daughter of a Penobscot chief. By him Christianity was first introduced among the natives of that region. He gained great influence over them. During his absence in 1688, his establishment was pillaged by the English, and he became their bitter foe. He taught the Indians around him the use of fire-arms, and he frequently co-operated with them in their attacks on the northeastern frontier. In 1696, with 200 Indians, he assisted Iberville in the capture of the fort at Pemaquid. In 1706-7 he assisted in the defence of Port Royal, and was wounded. He lived in America thirty years, when he returned to France, leaving Fort Castine and the domain around it to his half-breed son and successor in title. The young baron was really a friend to the English, but, being at the head of the Penobscot Indians, and suspected of being an enemy, he was surprised and captured in 1721,. taken to Boston, and imprisoned several months. His name is perpetuated in the town of Castin
United States (United States) (search for this): entry castine-vincent-baron-de
ristianity was first introduced among the natives of that region. He gained great influence over them. During his absence in 1688, his establishment was pillaged by the English, and he became their bitter foe. He taught the Indians around him the use of fire-arms, and he frequently co-operated with them in their attacks on the northeastern frontier. In 1696, with 200 Indians, he assisted Iberville in the capture of the fort at Pemaquid. In 1706-7 he assisted in the defence of Port Royal, and was wounded. He lived in America thirty years, when he returned to France, leaving Fort Castine and the domain around it to his half-breed son and successor in title. The young baron was really a friend to the English, but, being at the head of the Penobscot Indians, and suspected of being an enemy, he was surprised and captured in 1721,. taken to Boston, and imprisoned several months. His name is perpetuated in the town of Castine, at which place slight traces of his fort are yet visible.
or near the mouth of the Penobscot River, and married the daughter of a Penobscot chief. By him Christianity was first introduced among the natives of that region. He gained great influence over them. During his absence in 1688, his establishment was pillaged by the English, and he became their bitter foe. He taught the Indians around him the use of fire-arms, and he frequently co-operated with them in their attacks on the northeastern frontier. In 1696, with 200 Indians, he assisted Iberville in the capture of the fort at Pemaquid. In 1706-7 he assisted in the defence of Port Royal, and was wounded. He lived in America thirty years, when he returned to France, leaving Fort Castine and the domain around it to his half-breed son and successor in title. The young baron was really a friend to the English, but, being at the head of the Penobscot Indians, and suspected of being an enemy, he was surprised and captured in 1721,. taken to Boston, and imprisoned several months. His n
Castine, Vincent, Baron De 1665- Military officer; born in Orleans, France; a scion of a noble family. At the age of Remains of Fort Castine. seventeen years, he was colonel of the King's body-guard, and when the regiment to which he belonged was sent to Canada (1665) he went with it and remained after it was disbanded. In 1667 he established a trading-post and built a fort at or near the mouth of the Penobscot River, and married the daughter of a Penobscot chief. By him Christianity was first introduced among the natives of that region. He gained great influence over them. During his absence in 1688, his establishment was pillaged by the English, and he became their bitter foe. He taught the Indians around him the use of fire-arms, and he frequently co-operated with them in their attacks on the northeastern frontier. In 1696, with 200 Indians, he assisted Iberville in the capture of the fort at Pemaquid. In 1706-7 he assisted in the defence of Port Royal, and was wounde
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