hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 817 total hits in 229 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
census office in the Department of the Interior. Additions were made to the previous acts, such as the indebtedness of cities, counties, and incorporated villages; reports were provided for from railways, to ascertain their condition, business, etc.; also, similar information was asked for in regard to express and telegraph companies; experts were employed in place of the enumerators to collect social and manufacturing statistics. General Walker was appointed superintendent of the census April 1, 1879; resigned Nov. 3, 1881; and was succeeded by Charles W. Seaton, who died before the work was completed. The office of superintendent of the census was abolished in 1885, and was re-established by the act of March 1, 1889. Robert P. Porter was appointed superintendent of the Population of the United States in 1890 and 1900. States and Territories.Population.Increase Since 1900.1890.1890. Alabama1,828,6971,513,017315,680 Alaska63,44132,05231,389 Arizona122,93159,62063,311 Ark
ten years, as follows: Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within the Union according to their respective numbers, which may be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to service for a term of years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons. The first act of Congress for the census-taking was dated March 1, 1790; the enumeration was to begin the first Monday of August, and close within nine months thereafter. The free persons were to be distinguished from others, males and females, and Indians not taxed were to be omitted from the enumeration. Free males of sixteen years and over were to be distinguished from those under that age. By that census there were 3,929,214 persons in the United States, of whom 697,681 were slaves and 59,527 were free colored persons. In 1810 the act provided for an enumeration of the inhabitants, distinguishing between races,
, together with the percentage of increase, the balance of sexes, and the population to each square mile: General table 1790-1900. Date.TotalPer Cent. ofPopulation perSexes per 1,000 Population.Urban Population.Per Cent. of Population.Increase.Square Mile.Male.Female.Urban Population to Total. 1790 3,929,2144.75509491131,4723.35 1800 5,308,48335.116.41512488210,8733.97 1810 .7,239,88136.403.62510490356,9204.93 1820 9,633,82233.064.82508492475,1354.93 1830 12,866,02033.556.255084928611,318,54722.57 1890 . 63,069,75624.8520.7851148918,235,67029.12 1900 76,295,22020.97(Not yet reported ) Previous to 1790 there were no definite figures of population; everything was estimate. During the life of the Continental Congress the taeventh census (1900) was taken under the directorship of William R. Merriam A table showing the centre of population from 1790 to 1900 will be found under Centre of population. The following table shows the population, according to the census of
r an enumeration of the population as often as once in every ten years, as follows: Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within the Union according to their respective numbers, which may be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to service for a term of years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons. The first act of Congress for the census-taking was dated March 1, 1790; the enumeration was to begin the first Monday of August, and close within nine months thereafter. The free persons were to be distinguished from others, males and females, and Indians not taxed were to be omitted from the enumeration. Free males of sixteen years and over were to be distinguished from those under that age. By that census there were 3,929,214 persons in the United States, of whom 697,681 were slaves and 59,527 were free colored persons. In 1810 the act provided for an
Census, United States The following table gives the total and the urban population of the United States at each decade, together with the percentage of increase, the balance of sexes, and the population to each square mile: General table 1790-1900. Date.TotalPer Cent. ofPopulation perSexes per 1,000 Population.Urban Population.Per Cent. of Population.Increase.Square Mile.Male.Female.Urban Population to Total. 1790 3,929,2144.75509491131,4723.35 1800 5,308,48335.116.41512488210,8733.97 1810 .7,239,88136.403.62510490356,9204.93 1820 9,633,82233.064.82508492475,1354.93 1830 12,866,02033.556.25508492864,5096.72 1840 17,069,45332.678.295094911,453,9948.52 1850 23,191,87635.867.785114892,897,58612.49 1860 31,443,32135.5810.395114895,072,25616.13 1870 38,558,37122.6310.705074938,071,87520.93 1880 .50,155,78330.0813.9251049011,318,54722.57 1890 . 63,069,75624.8520.7851148918,235,67029.12 1900 76,295,22020.97(Not yet reported ) Previous to 1790 there were no defin
Date.TotalPer Cent. ofPopulation perSexes per 1,000 Population.Urban Population.Per Cent. of Population.Increase.Square Mile.Male.Female.Urban Population to Total. 1790 3,929,2144.75509491131,4723.35 1800 5,308,48335.116.41512488210,8733.97 1810 .7,239,88136.403.62510490356,9204.93 1820 9,633,82233.064.82508492475,1354.93 1830 12,866,02033.556.25508492864,5096.72 1840 17,069,45332.678.295094911,453,9948.52 1850 23,191,87635.867.785114892,897,58612.49 1860 31,443,32135.5810.395114895from the enumeration. Free males of sixteen years and over were to be distinguished from those under that age. By that census there were 3,929,214 persons in the United States, of whom 697,681 were slaves and 59,527 were free colored persons. In 1810 the act provided for an enumeration of the inhabitants, distinguishing between races, sexes, and ages. In 1820 another step forward was taken, in that it was required of the enumerators that their reports show the number of persons engaged in a
per 1,000 Population.Urban Population.Per Cent. of Population.Increase.Square Mile.Male.Female.Urban Population to Total. 1790 3,929,2144.75509491131,4723.35 1800 5,308,48335.116.41512488210,8733.97 1810 .7,239,88136.403.62510490356,9204.93 1820 9,633,82233.064.82508492475,1354.93 1830 12,866,02033.556.25508492864,5096.72 1840 17,069,45332.678.295094911,453,9948.52 1850 23,191,87635.867.785114892,897,58612.49 1860 31,443,32135.5810.395114895,072,25616.13 1870 38,558,37122.6310.7050 that census there were 3,929,214 persons in the United States, of whom 697,681 were slaves and 59,527 were free colored persons. In 1810 the act provided for an enumeration of the inhabitants, distinguishing between races, sexes, and ages. In 1820 another step forward was taken, in that it was required of the enumerators that their reports show the number of persons engaged in agriculture, manufactures, and commerce. In 1830 there was required an enumeration of the deaf, dumb, and blind,
rs and over were to be distinguished from those under that age. By that census there were 3,929,214 persons in the United States, of whom 697,681 were slaves and 59,527 were free colored persons. In 1810 the act provided for an enumeration of the inhabitants, distinguishing between races, sexes, and ages. In 1820 another step forward was taken, in that it was required of the enumerators that their reports show the number of persons engaged in agriculture, manufactures, and commerce. In 1830 there was required an enumeration of the deaf, dumb, and blind, but there were no statistics of agriculture, manufactures, or commerce. In 1838 preparations were made for taking the sixth census, and the act is very comprehensive, embracing the enumeration of the population, with classification, according to age, sex, and color, the deaf, dumb, and blind, insane, idiots, free and slave colored; number of persons drawing pensions from the United States, with their names and ages; also statist
were slaves and 59,527 were free colored persons. In 1810 the act provided for an enumeration of the inhabitants, distinguishing between races, sexes, and ages. In 1820 another step forward was taken, in that it was required of the enumerators that their reports show the number of persons engaged in agriculture, manufactures, and commerce. In 1830 there was required an enumeration of the deaf, dumb, and blind, but there were no statistics of agriculture, manufactures, or commerce. In 1838 preparations were made for taking the sixth census, and the act is very comprehensive, embracing the enumeration of the population, with classification, according to age, sex, and color, the deaf, dumb, and blind, insane, idiots, free and slave colored; number of persons drawing pensions from the United States, with their names and ages; also statistical tables of mines, agriculture, commerce, manufactures, and schools. The returns made show the products of mines, manufactures, number of bus
th the percentage of increase, the balance of sexes, and the population to each square mile: General table 1790-1900. Date.TotalPer Cent. ofPopulation perSexes per 1,000 Population.Urban Population.Per Cent. of Population.Increase.Square Mile.Male.Female.Urban Population to Total. 1790 3,929,2144.75509491131,4723.35 1800 5,308,48335.116.41512488210,8733.97 1810 .7,239,88136.403.62510490356,9204.93 1820 9,633,82233.064.82508492475,1354.93 1830 12,866,02033.556.25508492864,5096.72 1840 17,069,45332.678.295094911,453,9948.52 1850 23,191,87635.867.785114892,897,58612.49 1860 31,443,32135.5810.395114895,072,25616.13 1870 38,558,37122.6310.705074938,071,87520.93 1880 .50,155,78330.0813.9251049011,318,54722.57 1890 . 63,069,75624.8520.7851148918,235,67029.12 1900 76,295,22020.97(Not yet reported ) Previous to 1790 there were no definite figures of population; everything was estimate. During the life of the Continental Congress the taxation apportionment, as well as
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...