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Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry cumberland-gap-actions-at
Cumberland Gap, actions at Cumberland Gap is a passage through the Cumberland Mountains, on the line between Kentucky and Tennessee and the western extremity of Virginia. It is a place about which clusters many a Civil War incident. It was occupied by Zollicoffer in his retreat, Nov. 13, 1861. On March 22, 1862, a reconnoissance in force was made from Cumberland Fort to this place. The Confederate pickets were driven in, and firing began early in the morning, which continued all day, wCumberland Gap is a passage through the Cumberland Mountains, on the line between Kentucky and Tennessee and the western extremity of Virginia. It is a place about which clusters many a Civil War incident. It was occupied by Zollicoffer in his retreat, Nov. 13, 1861. On March 22, 1862, a reconnoissance in force was made from Cumberland Fort to this place. The Confederate pickets were driven in, and firing began early in the morning, which continued all day, without any definite results. The Gap was occupied by the National forces under General Morgan, June 18. Skirmishing was of almost daily occurrence. In an engagement, Aug. 7, the Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, 125 men; National loss, 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 50 prisoners, large quantities of forage, tobacco, stores, horses and mules. General Morgan destroyed everything of value as war material, and evacuated the place Sept. 17, and, though surrounded by the enemy, he succeeded in
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): entry cumberland-gap-actions-at
Cumberland Gap, actions at Cumberland Gap is a passage through the Cumberland Mountains, on the line between Kentucky and Tennessee and the western extremity of Virginia. It is a place about which clusters many a Civil War incident. It was occupied by Zollicoffer in his retreat, Nov. 13, 1861. On March 22, 1862, a reconnoissance in force was made from Cumberland Fort to this place. The Confederate pickets were driven in, and firing began early in the morning, which continued all day, without any definite results. The Gap was occupied by the National forces under General Morgan, June 18. Skirmishing was of almost daily occurrence. In an engagement, Aug. 7, the Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, 125 men; National loss, 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 50 prisoners, large quantities of forage, tobacco, stores, horses and mules. General Morgan destroyed everything of value as war material, and evacuated the place Sept. 17, and, though surrounded by the enemy, he succeeded in
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry cumberland-gap-actions-at
Cumberland Gap, actions at Cumberland Gap is a passage through the Cumberland Mountains, on the line between Kentucky and Tennessee and the western extremity of Virginia. It is a place about which clusters many a Civil War incident. It was occupied by Zollicoffer in his retreat, Nov. 13, 1861. On March 22, 1862, a reconnoissance in force was made from Cumberland Fort to this place. The Confederate pickets were driven in, and firing began early in the morning, which continued all day, without any definite results. The Gap was occupied by the National forces under General Morgan, June 18. Skirmishing was of almost daily occurrence. In an engagement, Aug. 7, the Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, 125 men; National loss, 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 50 prisoners, large quantities of forage, tobacco, stores, horses and mules. General Morgan destroyed everything of value as war material, and evacuated the place Sept. 17, and, though surrounded by the enemy, he succeeded in
Cumberland Gap, actions at Cumberland Gap is a passage through the Cumberland Mountains, on the line between Kentucky and Tennessee and the western extremity of Virginia. It is a place about which clusters many a Civil War incident. It was occupied by Zollicoffer in his retreat, Nov. 13, 1861. On March 22, 1862, a reconnoissance in force was made from Cumberland Fort to this place. The Confederate pickets were driven in, and firing began early in the morning, which continued all day, without any definite results. The Gap was occupied by the National forces under General Morgan, June 18. Skirmishing was of almost daily occurrence. In an engagement, Aug. 7, the Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, 125 men; National loss, 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 50 prisoners, large quantities of forage, tobacco, stores, horses and mules. General Morgan destroyed everything of value as war material, and evacuated the place Sept. 17, and, though surrounded by the enemy, he succeeded in
rgan, June 18. Skirmishing was of almost daily occurrence. In an engagement, Aug. 7, the Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, 125 men; National loss, 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 50 prisoners, large quantities of forage, tobacco, stores, horses and mules. General Morgan destroyed everything of value as war material, and evacuated the place Sept. 17, and, though surrounded by the enemy, he succeeded in saving his command, which reached Greenupsburg on Oct. 3. The Gap was occupied by General Bragg, Oct. 22. On Sept. 8, 1863, the place, with 2,000 men and fourteen pieces of artillery, under the Confederate General Frazer, surrendered, without firing a gun, to General Shackleford; forty wagons, 200 mules, and a large quantity of commissary stores were captured. A three hours skirmish occurred Jan. 29, 1864, on the Virginia road, 13 miles distant. Colonel Love, with 1,600 cavalry, 400 only of whom were mounted, and with no artillery, held his position till dark, and then fell back
the Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, 125 men; National loss, 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 50 prisoners, large quantities of forage, tobacco, stores, horses and mules. General Morgan destroyed everything of value as war material, and evacuated the place Sept. 17, and, though surrounded by the enemy, he succeeded in saving his command, which reached Greenupsburg on Oct. 3. The Gap was occupied by General Bragg, Oct. 22. On Sept. 8, 1863, the place, with 2,000 men and fourteen pieces of artillery, under the Confederate General Frazer, surrendered, without firing a gun, to General Shackleford; forty wagons, 200 mules, and a large quantity of commissary stores were captured. A three hours skirmish occurred Jan. 29, 1864, on the Virginia road, 13 miles distant. Colonel Love, with 1,600 cavalry, 400 only of whom were mounted, and with no artillery, held his position till dark, and then fell back 3 miles to camp. On April 28, 1865, 900 Confederates surrendered and were paroled here.
ce in force was made from Cumberland Fort to this place. The Confederate pickets were driven in, and firing began early in the morning, which continued all day, without any definite results. The Gap was occupied by the National forces under General Morgan, June 18. Skirmishing was of almost daily occurrence. In an engagement, Aug. 7, the Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, 125 men; National loss, 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 50 prisoners, large quantities of forage, tobacco, stores, horses and mules. General Morgan destroyed everything of value as war material, and evacuated the place Sept. 17, and, though surrounded by the enemy, he succeeded in saving his command, which reached Greenupsburg on Oct. 3. The Gap was occupied by General Bragg, Oct. 22. On Sept. 8, 1863, the place, with 2,000 men and fourteen pieces of artillery, under the Confederate General Frazer, surrendered, without firing a gun, to General Shackleford; forty wagons, 200 mules, and a large quantity of commi
the Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, 125 men; National loss, 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 50 prisoners, large quantities of forage, tobacco, stores, horses and mules. General Morgan destroyed everything of value as war material, and evacuated the place Sept. 17, and, though surrounded by the enemy, he succeeded in saving his command, which reached Greenupsburg on Oct. 3. The Gap was occupied by General Bragg, Oct. 22. On Sept. 8, 1863, the place, with 2,000 men and fourteen pieces of artillery, under the Confederate General Frazer, surrendered, without firing a gun, to General Shackleford; forty wagons, 200 mules, and a large quantity of commissary stores were captured. A three hours skirmish occurred Jan. 29, 1864, on the Virginia road, 13 miles distant. Colonel Love, with 1,600 cavalry, 400 only of whom were mounted, and with no artillery, held his position till dark, and then fell back 3 miles to camp. On April 28, 1865, 900 Confederates surrendered and were paroled here.
he Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, 125 men; National loss, 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 50 prisoners, large quantities of forage, tobacco, stores, horses and mules. General Morgan destroyed everything of value as war material, and evacuated the place Sept. 17, and, though surrounded by the enemy, he succeeded in saving his command, which reached Greenupsburg on Oct. 3. The Gap was occupied by General Bragg, Oct. 22. On Sept. 8, 1863, the place, with 2,000 men and fourteen pieces of artillery, under the Confederate General Frazer, surrendered, without firing a gun, to General Shackleford; forty wagons, 200 mules, and a large quantity of commissary stores were captured. A three hours skirmish occurred Jan. 29, 1864, on the Virginia road, 13 miles distant. Colonel Love, with 1,600 cavalry, 400 only of whom were mounted, and with no artillery, held his position till dark, and then fell back 3 miles to camp. On April 28, 1865, 900 Confederates surrendered and were paroled here.
Cumberland Gap, actions at Cumberland Gap is a passage through the Cumberland Mountains, on the line between Kentucky and Tennessee and the western extremity of Virginia. It is a place about which clusters many a Civil War incident. It was occupied by Zollicoffer in his retreat, Nov. 13, 1861. On March 22, 1862, a reconnoissance in force was made from Cumberland Fort to this place. The Confederate pickets were driven in, and firing began early in the morning, which continued all day, without any definite results. The Gap was occupied by the National forces under General Morgan, June 18. Skirmishing was of almost daily occurrence. In an engagement, Aug. 7, the Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, 125 men; National loss, 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 50 prisoners, large quantities of forage, tobacco, stores, horses and mules. General Morgan destroyed everything of value as war material, and evacuated the place Sept. 17, and, though surrounded by the enemy, he succeeded in
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