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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 14 total hits in 11 results.

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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry cushing-thomas
Cushing, Thomas 1725- Statesman; born in Boston, March 24, 1725; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and for many years represented his native city in the General Court, of which body he became speaker in 1763, and held that post until 1774. His signature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushing with a diadem. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congresses; was commissarygeneral in 1775; a judge; and in 1779 was elected lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, which office he held until his death, in Boston, Feb. 28, 1788.
Cushing, Thomas 1725- Statesman; born in Boston, March 24, 1725; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and for many years represented his native city in the General Court, of which body he became speaker in 1763, and held that post until 1774. His signature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushinignature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushing with a diadem. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congresses; was commissarygeneral in 1775; a judge; and in 1779 was elected lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, which office he held until his death, in Boston, Feb. 28, 1788.
Cushing, Thomas 1725- Statesman; born in Boston, March 24, 1725; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and for many years represented his native city in the General Court, of which body he became speaker in 1763, and held that post until 1774. His signature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushing with a diadem. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congresses; was commissarygeneral in 1775; a judge; and in 1779 was elected lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, which office he held until his death, in Boston, Feb. 28, 1788.
Cushing, Thomas 1725- Statesman; born in Boston, March 24, 1725; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and for many years represented his native city in the General Court, of which body he became speaker in 1763, and held that post until 1774. His signature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushing with a diadem. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congresses; was commissarygeneral in 1775; a judge; and in 1779 was elected lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, which office he held until his death, in Boston, Feb. 28, 1788.
Cushing, Thomas 1725- Statesman; born in Boston, March 24, 1725; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and for many years represented his native city in the General Court, of which body he became speaker in 1763, and held that post until 1774. His signature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushing with a diadem. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congresses; was commissarygeneral in 1775; a judge; and in 1779 was elected lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, which office he held until his death, in Boston, Feb. 28, 1788.
Cushing, Thomas 1725- Statesman; born in Boston, March 24, 1725; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and for many years represented his native city in the General Court, of which body he became speaker in 1763, and held that post until 1774. His signature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushing with a diadem. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congresses; was commissarygeneral in 1775; a judge; and in 1779 was elected lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, which office he held until his death, in Boston, Feb. 28, 1788.
Cushing, Thomas 1725- Statesman; born in Boston, March 24, 1725; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and for many years represented his native city in the General Court, of which body he became speaker in 1763, and held that post until 1774. His signature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushing with a diadem. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congresses; was commissarygeneral in 1775; a judge; and in 1779 was elected lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, which office he held until his death, in Boston, Feb. 28, 1788.
March 24th, 1725 AD (search for this): entry cushing-thomas
Cushing, Thomas 1725- Statesman; born in Boston, March 24, 1725; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and for many years represented his native city in the General Court, of which body he became speaker in 1763, and held that post until 1774. His signature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushing with a diadem. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congresses; was commissarygeneral in 1775; a judge; and in 1779 was elected lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, which office he held until his death, in Boston, Feb. 28, 1788.
Cushing, Thomas 1725- Statesman; born in Boston, March 24, 1725; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and for many years represented his native city in the General Court, of which body he became speaker in 1763, and held that post until 1774. His signature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushing with a diadem. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congresses; was commissarygeneral in 1775; a judge; and in 1779 was elected lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, which office he held until his death, in Boston, Feb. 28, 1788.
February 28th, 1788 AD (search for this): entry cushing-thomas
Cushing, Thomas 1725- Statesman; born in Boston, March 24, 1725; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and for many years represented his native city in the General Court, of which body he became speaker in 1763, and held that post until 1774. His signature was affixed, during all that time, to all public documents of the province, which made his name so conspicuous that, in his pamphlet, Taxation no tyranny, Dr. Johnson said, One object of the Americans is said to be to adorn the brows of Cushing with a diadem. He was a member of the first and second Continental Congresses; was commissarygeneral in 1775; a judge; and in 1779 was elected lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, which office he held until his death, in Boston, Feb. 28, 1788.
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