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uncil. When the Indians retired, the gates of the fort were closed upon them, and, knowing the reason, Pontiac began a siege that lasted a year. General Amherst hastily collected a small body in the East for the relief of Detroit and reinforcement of Fort Niagara, and sent them under the command of Captain Dalzell, one of his aides. Dalzell left reinforcements at Niagara, and proceeded to Detroit with the remainder of his troops and provisions in a vessel that arrived on the evening of July 30. They succeeded in entering the fort with provisions. Pontiac had already summoned Gladwin to surrender; now Dalzell proposed to make a sortie and attack the besieging Indians. Gladwin thought it would be imprudent, but Dalzell persisted, and before daylight on the morning of July 31 he sallied out with 240 chosen men to attack the Indians who lay about a mile up the river. Pontiac was on the alert, and, at a small stream on the northern verge of Detroit, the English, furiously assailed
the command of Captain Dalzell, one of his aides. Dalzell left reinforcements at Niagara, and proceeded to Detroit with the remainder of his troops and provisions in a vessel that arrived on the evening of July 30. They succeeded in entering the fort with provisions. Pontiac had already summoned Gladwin to surrender; now Dalzell proposed to make a sortie and attack the besieging Indians. Gladwin thought it would be imprudent, but Dalzell persisted, and before daylight on the morning of July 31 he sallied out with 240 chosen men to attack the Indians who lay about a mile up the river. Pontiac was on the alert, and, at a small stream on the northern verge of Detroit, the English, furiously assailed by the Indians, were forced to make a precipitate retreat in the darkness, leaving twenty of their comrades killed and forty-two wounded on the border of the brook, which has ever since been called Bloody Run. Dalzell was slain while trying to carry off some of the wounded, and his sc
Dalzell was slain while trying to carry off some of the wounded, and his scalp became an Indian's trophy. Pontiac continued the siege of Detroit until the arrival of Colonel Bradstreet in May, 1764. The city was the scene of disastrous operations in the early part of the War of 1812-15. In August, 1812, General Brock, governor of Upper Canada, with a few regulars and 300 militia, hastened to Amherstburg to assist in turning back the invaders of Canada. He arrived there on the night of Aug. 13. Tecumseh and his Indian warriors were on an island opposite Fort Malden. On the following morning Brock held a conference with the Indians (of whom about 1,000 were present), telling them he had come to assist in driving the Americans from their rightful hunting-grounds north of the Ohio. The Indians were pleased, and, at a subsequent interview with Tecumseh and the other chiefs, they assured him that the Indians would give him all their strength in the undertaking. Then Brock marche
September 6th (search for this): entry detroit
the enemy were preparing to storm the fort, Hull, without consulting any of his officers, hoisted a white flag, and a capitulation for a surrender was soon agreed upon. The surrender took place at noon, Aug. 16, 1812. The fort, garrison, army, and the Territory of Michigan were ineluded in the terms of surrender. The spoils of victory for the British were 2,500 stand of arms, twenty-five iron and eight brass pieces of ordnance, forty barrels of gunpowder, a, stand of colors, a great quantity of military stores, and the armed brig John Adams. One of the brass cannon bore the following inscription: Taken at Saratoga on the 17th of October, 1777. General Hull and his fellow-captives were sent first to Fort George and then to Montreal, where they arrived Sept. 6, when they were paroled, and returned to their homes. Hull was tried for treason and cowardice, and sentended to be shot, but was pardoned by the President. His character has since been fully vindicated. See Hull, William.
November 29th, 1700 AD (search for this): entry detroit
market value of $21,684,539, and had a net general debt of $3,810,568, and a water debt of $1,033,000. The population in 1890 was 205,876; in 1900, 285,704. Detroit was first settled by Antoine Cadillac, July 24, 1701, with fifty soldiers and fifty artisans and traders. Three years later the first white child, a daughter of Cadillac, was baptized in the place, which was called by the French La Ville d'etroit. The French surrendered Detroit to the English, under Maj. Robert Rodgers, Nov. 29, 1700. The tragedy of Pontiac's War opened in Detroit. Under pretext of holding a friendly council with Major Gladwin, commander of the fort, the wily chief entered it in May, 1763, with about 300 warriors, each carrying a knife, tomahawk, and short gun under his blanket. When Pontiac should rise and present the green side of a belt, the massacre of the garrison was to begin. Gladwin was warned of the plot the day before by a friendly Indian, and the calamity was averted by the appointme
July 24th, 1701 AD (search for this): entry detroit
government is constructing Fort Wayne, a short distance below the city, which is designed to be the Landing of Cadillac. strongest American fortification on the northern frontier. In 1900 the city had an assessed property valuation of $244,371,550, owned unencumbered property of a market value of $21,684,539, and had a net general debt of $3,810,568, and a water debt of $1,033,000. The population in 1890 was 205,876; in 1900, 285,704. Detroit was first settled by Antoine Cadillac, July 24, 1701, with fifty soldiers and fifty artisans and traders. Three years later the first white child, a daughter of Cadillac, was baptized in the place, which was called by the French La Ville d'etroit. The French surrendered Detroit to the English, under Maj. Robert Rodgers, Nov. 29, 1700. The tragedy of Pontiac's War opened in Detroit. Under pretext of holding a friendly council with Major Gladwin, commander of the fort, the wily chief entered it in May, 1763, with about 300 warriors, ea
May, 1763 AD (search for this): entry detroit
ttled by Antoine Cadillac, July 24, 1701, with fifty soldiers and fifty artisans and traders. Three years later the first white child, a daughter of Cadillac, was baptized in the place, which was called by the French La Ville d'etroit. The French surrendered Detroit to the English, under Maj. Robert Rodgers, Nov. 29, 1700. The tragedy of Pontiac's War opened in Detroit. Under pretext of holding a friendly council with Major Gladwin, commander of the fort, the wily chief entered it in May, 1763, with about 300 warriors, each carrying a knife, tomahawk, and short gun under his blanket. When Pontiac should rise and present the green side of a belt, the massacre of the garrison was to begin. Gladwin was warned of the plot the day before by a friendly Indian, and the calamity was averted by the appointment of another day for the A public square in Detroit, showing the soldiers and sailors' monument. council. When the Indians retired, the gates of the fort were closed upon them
May, 1764 AD (search for this): entry detroit
ert, and, at a small stream on the northern verge of Detroit, the English, furiously assailed by the Indians, were forced to make a precipitate retreat in the darkness, leaving twenty of their comrades killed and forty-two wounded on the border of the brook, which has ever since been called Bloody Run. Dalzell was slain while trying to carry off some of the wounded, and his scalp became an Indian's trophy. Pontiac continued the siege of Detroit until the arrival of Colonel Bradstreet in May, 1764. The city was the scene of disastrous operations in the early part of the War of 1812-15. In August, 1812, General Brock, governor of Upper Canada, with a few regulars and 300 militia, hastened to Amherstburg to assist in turning back the invaders of Canada. He arrived there on the night of Aug. 13. Tecumseh and his Indian warriors were on an island opposite Fort Malden. On the following morning Brock held a conference with the Indians (of whom about 1,000 were present), telling the
October 17th, 1777 AD (search for this): entry detroit
the enemy were preparing to storm the fort, Hull, without consulting any of his officers, hoisted a white flag, and a capitulation for a surrender was soon agreed upon. The surrender took place at noon, Aug. 16, 1812. The fort, garrison, army, and the Territory of Michigan were ineluded in the terms of surrender. The spoils of victory for the British were 2,500 stand of arms, twenty-five iron and eight brass pieces of ordnance, forty barrels of gunpowder, a, stand of colors, a great quantity of military stores, and the armed brig John Adams. One of the brass cannon bore the following inscription: Taken at Saratoga on the 17th of October, 1777. General Hull and his fellow-captives were sent first to Fort George and then to Montreal, where they arrived Sept. 6, when they were paroled, and returned to their homes. Hull was tried for treason and cowardice, and sentended to be shot, but was pardoned by the President. His character has since been fully vindicated. See Hull, William.
ed by the Indians, were forced to make a precipitate retreat in the darkness, leaving twenty of their comrades killed and forty-two wounded on the border of the brook, which has ever since been called Bloody Run. Dalzell was slain while trying to carry off some of the wounded, and his scalp became an Indian's trophy. Pontiac continued the siege of Detroit until the arrival of Colonel Bradstreet in May, 1764. The city was the scene of disastrous operations in the early part of the War of 1812-15. In August, 1812, General Brock, governor of Upper Canada, with a few regulars and 300 militia, hastened to Amherstburg to assist in turning back the invaders of Canada. He arrived there on the night of Aug. 13. Tecumseh and his Indian warriors were on an island opposite Fort Malden. On the following morning Brock held a conference with the Indians (of whom about 1,000 were present), telling them he had come to assist in driving the Americans from their rightful hunting-grounds north o
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