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Duane, James, 1733-1797 Jurist; born in New York City, Feb. 6, 1733; inherited a large estate at the site of Duanesburg, which he began to settle in 1765. In 1759 he married a daughter of Col. Robert Livingston. He became an active patriot in the Revolution; was a member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the
February 6th, 1733 AD (search for this): entry duane-james
Duane, James, 1733-1797 Jurist; born in New York City, Feb. 6, 1733; inherited a large estate at the site of Duanesburg, which he began to settle in 1765. In 1759 he married a daughter of Col. Robert Livingston. He became an active patriot in the Revolution; was a member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the
Duane, James, 1733-1797 Jurist; born in New York City, Feb. 6, 1733; inherited a large estate at the site of Duanesburg, which he began to settle in 1765. In 1759 he married a daughter of Col. Robert Livingston. He became an active patriot in the Revolution; was a member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the
Duane, James, 1733-1797 Jurist; born in New York City, Feb. 6, 1733; inherited a large estate at the site of Duanesburg, which he began to settle in 1765. In 1759 he married a daughter of Col. Robert Livingston. He became an active patriot in the Revolution; was a member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the
Duane, James, 1733-1797 Jurist; born in New York City, Feb. 6, 1733; inherited a large estate at the site of Duanesburg, which he began to settle in 1765. In 1759 he married a daughter of Col. Robert Livingston. He became an active patriot in the Revolution; was a member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the
nvention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the unhappy disputes subsisting between Great Britain and the colonies, and that this be made a part of the [second] petition to the King prepared by John Jay. It was a dangerous James Duane proposal at that time, as it was calculated to cool the ardor of resistance which then animated the people. Duane was a stanch patriot, but was anxious for peace, if it could be procured wi
Duane, James, 1733-1797 Jurist; born in New York City, Feb. 6, 1733; inherited a large estate at the site of Duanesburg, which he began to settle in 1765. In 1759 he married a daughter of Col. Robert Livingston. He became an active patriot in the Revolution; was a member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the
Duane, James, 1733-1797 Jurist; born in New York City, Feb. 6, 1733; inherited a large estate at the site of Duanesburg, which he began to settle in 1765. In 1759 he married a daughter of Col. Robert Livingston. He became an active patriot in the Revolution; was a member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the
Duane, James, 1733-1797 Jurist; born in New York City, Feb. 6, 1733; inherited a large estate at the site of Duanesburg, which he began to settle in 1765. In 1759 he married a daughter of Col. Robert Livingston. He became an active patriot in the Revolution; was a member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the
Duane, James, 1733-1797 Jurist; born in New York City, Feb. 6, 1733; inherited a large estate at the site of Duanesburg, which he began to settle in 1765. In 1759 he married a daughter of Col. Robert Livingston. He became an active patriot in the Revolution; was a member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the
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