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ity. The United States stands alone in maintaining four permanent expositions: one in the former Art Palace of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, now known as the Field Columbian Museum; another in the former Memorial Hall of the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia; and two, known as Commercial Museums, in Philadelphia. The following is a list of the principal industrial expositions of the world, to nearly all of which the United States has been a large contributor: London, 1851; Cork, 1852; New York, New Brunswick, Madras, and Dublin, each 1853; Munich, 1854; Paris, 1855; Edinburgh and Manchester, each 1857; London, 1862; Paris, 1867; Vienna, 1873; Philadelphia, 1876; Paris, 1878; Atlanta, 1881; Louisville, 1883; New Orleans, 1884-85; Paris, 1889; Chicago, 1893; Atlanta, 1895; Nashville, 1897; Omaha, 1898; Omaha and Philadelphia, each 1899; Paris, 1900; Buffalo and Glasgow, each 1901. For details of the most noteworthy of these expositions, see their respective titles.
ity. The United States stands alone in maintaining four permanent expositions: one in the former Art Palace of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, now known as the Field Columbian Museum; another in the former Memorial Hall of the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia; and two, known as Commercial Museums, in Philadelphia. The following is a list of the principal industrial expositions of the world, to nearly all of which the United States has been a large contributor: London, 1851; Cork, 1852; New York, New Brunswick, Madras, and Dublin, each 1853; Munich, 1854; Paris, 1855; Edinburgh and Manchester, each 1857; London, 1862; Paris, 1867; Vienna, 1873; Philadelphia, 1876; Paris, 1878; Atlanta, 1881; Louisville, 1883; New Orleans, 1884-85; Paris, 1889; Chicago, 1893; Atlanta, 1895; Nashville, 1897; Omaha, 1898; Omaha and Philadelphia, each 1899; Paris, 1900; Buffalo and Glasgow, each 1901. For details of the most noteworthy of these expositions, see their respective titles.
ity. The United States stands alone in maintaining four permanent expositions: one in the former Art Palace of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, now known as the Field Columbian Museum; another in the former Memorial Hall of the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia; and two, known as Commercial Museums, in Philadelphia. The following is a list of the principal industrial expositions of the world, to nearly all of which the United States has been a large contributor: London, 1851; Cork, 1852; New York, New Brunswick, Madras, and Dublin, each 1853; Munich, 1854; Paris, 1855; Edinburgh and Manchester, each 1857; London, 1862; Paris, 1867; Vienna, 1873; Philadelphia, 1876; Paris, 1878; Atlanta, 1881; Louisville, 1883; New Orleans, 1884-85; Paris, 1889; Chicago, 1893; Atlanta, 1895; Nashville, 1897; Omaha, 1898; Omaha and Philadelphia, each 1899; Paris, 1900; Buffalo and Glasgow, each 1901. For details of the most noteworthy of these expositions, see their respective titles.
ity. The United States stands alone in maintaining four permanent expositions: one in the former Art Palace of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, now known as the Field Columbian Museum; another in the former Memorial Hall of the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia; and two, known as Commercial Museums, in Philadelphia. The following is a list of the principal industrial expositions of the world, to nearly all of which the United States has been a large contributor: London, 1851; Cork, 1852; New York, New Brunswick, Madras, and Dublin, each 1853; Munich, 1854; Paris, 1855; Edinburgh and Manchester, each 1857; London, 1862; Paris, 1867; Vienna, 1873; Philadelphia, 1876; Paris, 1878; Atlanta, 1881; Louisville, 1883; New Orleans, 1884-85; Paris, 1889; Chicago, 1893; Atlanta, 1895; Nashville, 1897; Omaha, 1898; Omaha and Philadelphia, each 1899; Paris, 1900; Buffalo and Glasgow, each 1901. For details of the most noteworthy of these expositions, see their respective titles.
ity. The United States stands alone in maintaining four permanent expositions: one in the former Art Palace of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, now known as the Field Columbian Museum; another in the former Memorial Hall of the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia; and two, known as Commercial Museums, in Philadelphia. The following is a list of the principal industrial expositions of the world, to nearly all of which the United States has been a large contributor: London, 1851; Cork, 1852; New York, New Brunswick, Madras, and Dublin, each 1853; Munich, 1854; Paris, 1855; Edinburgh and Manchester, each 1857; London, 1862; Paris, 1867; Vienna, 1873; Philadelphia, 1876; Paris, 1878; Atlanta, 1881; Louisville, 1883; New Orleans, 1884-85; Paris, 1889; Chicago, 1893; Atlanta, 1895; Nashville, 1897; Omaha, 1898; Omaha and Philadelphia, each 1899; Paris, 1900; Buffalo and Glasgow, each 1901. For details of the most noteworthy of these expositions, see their respective titles.
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