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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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French West Indies, the Canada conquered, the British turned their arms against the French West India Islands, in which the colonies participated. Gaudeloupe had already been taken. General Monckton, after submitting his commission as governor to the council of New York, sailed from that port (January, 1762), with two line-of-battle ships, 100 transports, and 1,200 regulars and colonial troops. Major Gates (afterwards adjutant-general of the Continental army) went with Monckton as aide-de-camp, and carried to England the news of the capture of Martinique. Richard Montgomery (afterwards a general in the Continental army) held the rank of captain in this expedition. The colonial troops were led by Gen. Phineas Lyman. Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent's—indeed, every island in the Caribbean group possessed by the French-fell into the hands of the English. The French fleet was ruined, and French merchantmen were driven from the seas. British vessels, including those of New
French West Indies, the Canada conquered, the British turned their arms against the French West India Islands, in which the colonies participated. Gaudeloupe had already been taken. General Monckton, after submitting his commission as governor to the council of New York, sailed from that port (January, 1762), with two line-of-battle ships, 100 transports, and 1,200 regulars and colonial troops. Major Gates (afterwards adjutant-general of the Continental army) went with Monckton as aide-de-camp, and carried to England the news of the capture of Martinique. Richard Montgomery (afterwards a general in the Continental army) held the rank of captain in this expedition. The colonial troops were led by Gen. Phineas Lyman. Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent's—indeed, every island in the Caribbean group possessed by the French-fell into the hands of the English. The French fleet was ruined, and French merchantmen were driven from the seas. British vessels, including those of New
articipated. Gaudeloupe had already been taken. General Monckton, after submitting his commission as governor to the council of New York, sailed from that port (January, 1762), with two line-of-battle ships, 100 transports, and 1,200 regulars and colonial troops. Major Gates (afterwards adjutant-general of the Continental army) went with Monckton as aide-de-camp, and carried to England the news of the capture of Martinique. Richard Montgomery (afterwards a general in the Continental army) held the rank of captain in this expedition. The colonial troops were led by Gen. Phineas Lyman. Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent's—indeed, every island in the Caribbean group possessed by the French-fell into the hands of the English. The French fleet was ruined, and French merchantmen were driven from the seas. British vessels, including those of New York and New England, now obtained the carrying-trade of those islands; also, under safe conducts and flags of truce, that of Santo Doming
French West Indies, the Canada conquered, the British turned their arms against the French West India Islands, in which the colonies participated. Gaudeloupe had already been taken. General Monckton, after submitting his commission as governor to the council of New York, sailed from that port (January, 1762), with two line-of-battle ships, 100 transports, and 1,200 regulars and colonial troops. Major Gates (afterwards adjutant-general of the Continental army) went with Monckton as aide-Monckton as aide-de-camp, and carried to England the news of the capture of Martinique. Richard Montgomery (afterwards a general in the Continental army) held the rank of captain in this expedition. The colonial troops were led by Gen. Phineas Lyman. Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent's—indeed, every island in the Caribbean group possessed by the French-fell into the hands of the English. The French fleet was ruined, and French merchantmen were driven from the seas. British vessels, including those of New
inst the French West India Islands, in which the colonies participated. Gaudeloupe had already been taken. General Monckton, after submitting his commission as governor to the council of New York, sailed from that port (January, 1762), with two line-of-battle ships, 100 transports, and 1,200 regulars and colonial troops. Major Gates (afterwards adjutant-general of the Continental army) went with Monckton as aide-de-camp, and carried to England the news of the capture of Martinique. Richard Montgomery (afterwards a general in the Continental army) held the rank of captain in this expedition. The colonial troops were led by Gen. Phineas Lyman. Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent's—indeed, every island in the Caribbean group possessed by the French-fell into the hands of the English. The French fleet was ruined, and French merchantmen were driven from the seas. British vessels, including those of New York and New England, now obtained the carrying-trade of those islands; also, und
Grenada (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): entry french-west-indies-the
rticipated. Gaudeloupe had already been taken. General Monckton, after submitting his commission as governor to the council of New York, sailed from that port (January, 1762), with two line-of-battle ships, 100 transports, and 1,200 regulars and colonial troops. Major Gates (afterwards adjutant-general of the Continental army) went with Monckton as aide-de-camp, and carried to England the news of the capture of Martinique. Richard Montgomery (afterwards a general in the Continental army) held the rank of captain in this expedition. The colonial troops were led by Gen. Phineas Lyman. Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent's—indeed, every island in the Caribbean group possessed by the French-fell into the hands of the English. The French fleet was ruined, and French merchantmen were driven from the seas. British vessels, including those of New York and New England, now obtained the carrying-trade of those islands; also, under safe conducts and flags of truce, that of Santo Doming
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry french-west-indies-the
Canada conquered, the British turned their arms against the French West India Islands, in which the colonies participated. Gaudeloupe had already been taken. General Monckton, after submitting his commission as governor to the council of New York, sailed from that port (January, 1762), with two line-of-battle ships, 100 transports, and 1,200 regulars and colonial troops. Major Gates (afterwards adjutant-general of the Continental army) went with Monckton as aide-de-camp, and carried to England the news of the capture of Martinique. Richard Montgomery (afterwards a general in the Continental army) held the rank of captain in this expedition. The colonial troops were led by Gen. Phineas Lyman. Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent's—indeed, every island in the Caribbean group possessed by the French-fell into the hands of the English. The French fleet was ruined, and French merchantmen were driven from the seas. British vessels, including those of New York and New England, now o
French West Indies, the Canada conquered, the British turned their arms against the French West India Islands, in which the colonies participated. Gaudeloupe had already been taken. General Monckton, after submitting his commission as governor to the council of New York, sailed from that port (January, 1762), with two line-of-battle ships, 100 transports, and 1,200 regulars and colonial troops. Major Gates (afterwards adjutant-general of the Continental army) went with Monckton as aide-de-camp, and carried to England the news of the capture of Martinique. Richard Montgomery (afterwards a general in the Continental army) held the rank of captain in this expedition. The colonial troops were led by Gen. Phineas Lyman. Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent's—indeed, every island in the Caribbean group possessed by the French-fell into the hands of the English. The French fleet was ruined, and French merchantmen were driven from the seas. British vessels, including those of New
St. Lucia (Saint Lucia) (search for this): entry french-west-indies-the
rticipated. Gaudeloupe had already been taken. General Monckton, after submitting his commission as governor to the council of New York, sailed from that port (January, 1762), with two line-of-battle ships, 100 transports, and 1,200 regulars and colonial troops. Major Gates (afterwards adjutant-general of the Continental army) went with Monckton as aide-de-camp, and carried to England the news of the capture of Martinique. Richard Montgomery (afterwards a general in the Continental army) held the rank of captain in this expedition. The colonial troops were led by Gen. Phineas Lyman. Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent's—indeed, every island in the Caribbean group possessed by the French-fell into the hands of the English. The French fleet was ruined, and French merchantmen were driven from the seas. British vessels, including those of New York and New England, now obtained the carrying-trade of those islands; also, under safe conducts and flags of truce, that of Santo Doming
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): entry french-west-indies-the
rticipated. Gaudeloupe had already been taken. General Monckton, after submitting his commission as governor to the council of New York, sailed from that port (January, 1762), with two line-of-battle ships, 100 transports, and 1,200 regulars and colonial troops. Major Gates (afterwards adjutant-general of the Continental army) went with Monckton as aide-de-camp, and carried to England the news of the capture of Martinique. Richard Montgomery (afterwards a general in the Continental army) held the rank of captain in this expedition. The colonial troops were led by Gen. Phineas Lyman. Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent's—indeed, every island in the Caribbean group possessed by the French-fell into the hands of the English. The French fleet was ruined, and French merchantmen were driven from the seas. British vessels, including those of New York and New England, now obtained the carrying-trade of those islands; also, under safe conducts and flags of truce, that of Santo Domingo
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