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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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Amelia Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
by the most cruel methods—equal in atrocity to any perpetrated by the French in La Vendee and Brittany. The union of Great Britain and Ireland was effected in 1800, the parliament of the latter ceasing to exist. Against the King's wishes, peace was made with France in 1802; but war was again begun the next year. Then came the struggle with Napoleon Bonaparte, which lasted until the overthrow of that ruler at Waterloo, June, 1815. In 1810 the King lost his youngest and favorite daughter, Amelia, by death. His anxiety during her illness deprived him of reason. He had been threatened with insanity once or twice before; now his mind was clouded forever. The first indication of his malady appeared on the day of the completion of the fiftieth year of his reign, Oct. 25, 1810. From that date his reign ceased in fact, and his son George, Prince of Wales, was made regent of the kingdom (Feb. 5, 1811). For nearly nine years the care of his person was intrusted to the faithful Queen. In
pain, war with revolutionized France began in 1793, and the most arbitrary rule was exercised in England, driving the people at times to the verge of revolution. Ireland was goaded into rebellion, which was suppressed by the most cruel methods—equal in atrocity to any perpetrated by the French in La Vendee and Brittany. The union of Great Britain and Ireland was effected in 1800, the parliament of the latter ceasing to exist. Against the King's wishes, peace was made with France in 1802; but war was again begun the next year. Then came the struggle with Napoleon Bonaparte, which lasted until the overthrow of that ruler at Waterloo, June, 1815. In 1810 for orders to withdraw the British forces employed in America; and the Duke of Richmond, in the House of Lords, proposed a total change of measures in America and Ireland. In both Houses these sensible measures were supported by increasing numbers. North was frequently dropping hints to the King that the advantages to be gained
Windsor Castle (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
year of his reign, Oct. 25, 1810. From that date his reign ceased in fact, and his son George, Prince of Wales, was made regent of the kingdom (Feb. 5, 1811). For nearly nine years the care of his person was intrusted to the faithful Queen. In 1819 the Duke of York assumed the responsibility. The Queen was simple in her tastes and habits, rigid in the performance of moral duties, kind and benevolent. Their lives were models of moral purity and domestic happiness. The King died in Windsor Castle, Jan. 29, 1820. There were members of the aristocracy that, through envy, hated Pitt, who, in spite of them, had been called to the highest offices in the kingdom. When young Prince George heard of the death of the King, he went to Carleton House, the residence of his mother, and sent for Newcastle, Pitt's political enemy. He and Lord Bute prevailed upon the young King to discard Pitt and favor their own schemes. Newcastle prepared the first speech from the throne of George III.; a
ecause he was generally in political opposition to him and led a loose life. After a serious dispute with Russia, which threatened to seize Turkey, and another George III. with Spain, war with revolutionized France began in 1793, and the most arbitrary rule was exercised in England, driving the people at times to the verge of revolution. Ireland was goaded into rebellion, which was suppressed by the most cruel methods—equal in atrocity to any perpetrated by the French in La Vendee and Brittany. The union of Great Britain and Ireland was effected in 1800, the parliament of the latter ceasing to exist. Against the King's wishes, peace was made with France in 1802; but war was again begun the next year. Then came the struggle with Napoleon Bonaparte, which lasted until the overthrow of that ruler at Waterloo, June, 1815. In 1810 the King lost his youngest and favorite daughter, Amelia, by death. His anxiety during her illness deprived him of reason. He had been threatened wit
Fort George (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
n to any other man, owed its present power and glory, was allowed to retire and have his place filled by this Scotch adventurer. The people of England were disgusted, and by this blunder George created a powerful opposition party at the beginning of his reign. The people of New York City, grateful for the repeal of the Stamp Act, voted a statue to the King and to Pitt. That of the former was equestrian, made of lead, and gilded. It was placed in the centre of the Bowling Green, near Fort George, at the foot of Broadway. Raised upon a pedestal, with the head of the King and the horse facing westward, it made an imposing appearance. It was set up, with great parade, Aug. 21, 1770. Within six years afterwards the people pulled it down, with demonstrations of contempt. Washington occupied New York with Continental troops in the summer of 1776. There he received the Declaration of Independence (July 9), and it was read to the army. The same evening a large concourse of soldier
Schwerin (Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
g his long reign, while he was sane, his years were passed in continual combat against the growing liberal spirit of the age. Being a native of England (which his two royal predecessors were not), and young and moral, he was at first popular on his accession to the throne, Oct. 26, 1760. In his first speech in Parliament he expressed pride in his English birth, and thereby great enthusiasm in his favor was excited. On Sept. 8, 1761, he married Charlotte Sophia, sister of the Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, who shared his throne fifty-seven years, and bore him fifteen children, all but two of whom grew to maturity. Unfortunately for his kingdom, he neglected the wise counsels of Pitt, and made his preceptor, the Scotch Earl of Bute, his prime minister and confidential friend. The minister and his master became very unpopular, and in 1763 Bute resigned, and was succeeded by George Grenville (q. v.) who inaugurated the Stamp Act policy and other obnoxious measures towards the English-Am
Cambria (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
aving England and retiring to his little kingdom of Hanover, but refrained on being assured that it would be much easier for him to leave England than to return to it. Like his two royal predecessors, George hated his oldest son, the Prince of Wales, because he was generally in political opposition to him and led a loose life. After a serious dispute with Russia, which threatened to seize Turkey, and another George III. with Spain, war with revolutionized France began in 1793, and the mor twice before; now his mind was clouded forever. The first indication of his malady appeared on the day of the completion of the fiftieth year of his reign, Oct. 25, 1810. From that date his reign ceased in fact, and his son George, Prince of Wales, was made regent of the kingdom (Feb. 5, 1811). For nearly nine years the care of his person was intrusted to the faithful Queen. In 1819 the Duke of York assumed the responsibility. The Queen was simple in her tastes and habits, rigid in the
Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
ts present power and glory, was allowed to retire and have his place filled by this Scotch adventurer. The people of England were disgusted, and by this blunder George created a powerful opposition party at the beginning of his reign. The people of New York City, grateful for the repeal of the Stamp Act, voted a statue to the King and to Pitt. That of the former was equestrian, made of lead, and gilded. It was placed in the centre of the Bowling Green, near Fort George, at the foot of Broadway. Raised upon a pedestal, with the head of the King and the horse facing westward, it made an imposing appearance. It was set up, with great parade, Aug. 21, 1770. Within six years afterwards the people pulled it down, with demonstrations of contempt. Washington occupied New York with Continental troops in the summer of 1776. There he received the Declaration of Independence (July 9), and it was read to the army. The same evening a large concourse of soldiers and civilians assembled a
Hannover (Lower Saxony, Germany) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
bnoxious measures towards the English-American colonies, which caused great discontent, a fierce quarrel, a long war, the final dismemberment of the British empire, and the political independence of the colonies. With the Stamp Act began the terribly stormy period of the reign of George III. In 1783 he was compelled to acknowledge the independence of his lost American colonies. Then he had continual quarrels with his ministry, and talked of leaving England and retiring to his little kingdom of Hanover, but refrained on being assured that it would be much easier for him to leave England than to return to it. Like his two royal predecessors, George hated his oldest son, the Prince of Wales, because he was generally in political opposition to him and led a loose life. After a serious dispute with Russia, which threatened to seize Turkey, and another George III. with Spain, war with revolutionized France began in 1793, and the most arbitrary rule was exercised in England, drivin
Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): entry george-william-frederick
e verge of revolution. Ireland was goaded into rebellion, which was suppressed by the most cruel methods—equal in atrocity to any perpetrated by the French in La Vendee and Brittany. The union of Great Britain and Ireland was effected in 1800, the parliament of the latter ceasing to exist. Against the King's wishes, peace was made with France in 1802; but war was again begun the next year. Then came the struggle with Napoleon Bonaparte, which lasted until the overthrow of that ruler at Waterloo, June, 1815. In 1810 the King lost his youngest and favorite daughter, Amelia, by death. His anxiety during her illness deprived him of reason. He had been threatened with insanity once or twice before; now his mind was clouded forever. The first indication of his malady appeared on the day of the completion of the fiftieth year of his reign, Oct. 25, 1810. From that date his reign ceased in fact, and his son George, Prince of Wales, was made regent of the kingdom (Feb. 5, 1811). For n
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