hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 33 total hits in 11 results.

1 2
Guanica, A seaport in the southwestern corner of the province of Ponce, about 15 miles from the city of Ponce, Porto Rico. In the early part of the war between the United States and Spain (1898), when it became known that a military expedition under Gen. Nelson A. Miles (q. v.) was to be sent to Porto Rico, it was reported with apparent official sanction that the objective point was San Juan, which Admiral Sampson would cover with the guns of his fleet while a landing was being made by the troops. This, however, was a ruse to mislead the Spanish spies in New York and Washington, and while the Spaniards in San Juan were completing preparations to resist invasion, General Miles quietly debarked his army at Guanica on July 25, opposed only by a small force of Spaniards in a block-house. On the following day the Americans advanced to Yamo, and captured the railroad leading into Ponce. By July 29 all of the Americans, numbering 16,973 officers and men, had landed and concentrated i
Guanica, A seaport in the southwestern corner of the province of Ponce, about 15 miles from the city of Ponce, Porto Rico. In the early part of the war between the United States and Spain (1898), when it became known that a military expeditionPonce, Porto Rico. In the early part of the war between the United States and Spain (1898), when it became known that a military expedition under Gen. Nelson A. Miles (q. v.) was to be sent to Porto Rico, it was reported with apparent official sanction that the objective point was San Juan, which Admiral Sampson would cover with the guns of his fleet while a landing was being made by t Spaniards in a block-house. On the following day the Americans advanced to Yamo, and captured the railroad leading into Ponce. By July 29 all of the Americans, numbering 16,973 officers and men, had landed and concentrated in the neighborhood of e Americans advanced to Yamo, and captured the railroad leading into Ponce. By July 29 all of the Americans, numbering 16,973 officers and men, had landed and concentrated in the neighborhood of Ponce for a forward movement against San Juan(q. v.).
about 15 miles from the city of Ponce, Porto Rico. In the early part of the war between the United States and Spain (1898), when it became known that a military expedition under Gen. Nelson A. Miles (q. v.) was to be sent to Porto Rico, it was reported with apparent official sanction that the objective point was San Juan, which Admiral Sampson would cover with the guns of his fleet while a landing was being made by the troops. This, however, was a ruse to mislead the Spanish spies in New York and Washington, and while the Spaniards in San Juan were completing preparations to resist invasion, General Miles quietly debarked his army at Guanica on July 25, opposed only by a small force of Spaniards in a block-house. On the following day the Americans advanced to Yamo, and captured the railroad leading into Ponce. By July 29 all of the Americans, numbering 16,973 officers and men, had landed and concentrated in the neighborhood of Ponce for a forward movement against San Juan(q. v.).
United States (United States) (search for this): entry guanica
Guanica, A seaport in the southwestern corner of the province of Ponce, about 15 miles from the city of Ponce, Porto Rico. In the early part of the war between the United States and Spain (1898), when it became known that a military expedition under Gen. Nelson A. Miles (q. v.) was to be sent to Porto Rico, it was reported with apparent official sanction that the objective point was San Juan, which Admiral Sampson would cover with the guns of his fleet while a landing was being made by the troops. This, however, was a ruse to mislead the Spanish spies in New York and Washington, and while the Spaniards in San Juan were completing preparations to resist invasion, General Miles quietly debarked his army at Guanica on July 25, opposed only by a small force of Spaniards in a block-house. On the following day the Americans advanced to Yamo, and captured the railroad leading into Ponce. By July 29 all of the Americans, numbering 16,973 officers and men, had landed and concentrated
of the war between the United States and Spain (1898), when it became known that a military expedition under Gen. Nelson A. Miles (q. v.) was to be sent to Porto Rico, it was reported with apparent official sanction that the objective point was San Juan, which Admiral Sampson would cover with the guns of his fleet while a landing was being made by the troops. This, however, was a ruse to mislead the Spanish spies in New York and Washington, and while the Spaniards in San Juan were completing pk and Washington, and while the Spaniards in San Juan were completing preparations to resist invasion, General Miles quietly debarked his army at Guanica on July 25, opposed only by a small force of Spaniards in a block-house. On the following day the Americans advanced to Yamo, and captured the railroad leading into Ponce. By July 29 all of the Americans, numbering 16,973 officers and men, had landed and concentrated in the neighborhood of Ponce for a forward movement against San Juan(q. v.).
Nelson Appleton Miles (search for this): entry guanica
Guanica, A seaport in the southwestern corner of the province of Ponce, about 15 miles from the city of Ponce, Porto Rico. In the early part of the war between the United States and Spain (1898), when it became known that a military expedition under Gen. Nelson A. Miles (q. v.) was to be sent to Porto Rico, it was reported with apparent official sanction that the objective point was San Juan, which Admiral Sampson would cover with the guns of his fleet while a landing was being made by the troops. This, however, was a ruse to mislead the Spanish spies in New York and Washington, and while the Spaniards in San Juan were completing preparations to resist invasion, General Miles quietly debarked his army at Guanica on July 25, opposed only by a small force of Spaniards in a block-house. On the following day the Americans advanced to Yamo, and captured the railroad leading into Ponce. By July 29 all of the Americans, numbering 16,973 officers and men, had landed and concentrated i
William T. Sampson (search for this): entry guanica
Guanica, A seaport in the southwestern corner of the province of Ponce, about 15 miles from the city of Ponce, Porto Rico. In the early part of the war between the United States and Spain (1898), when it became known that a military expedition under Gen. Nelson A. Miles (q. v.) was to be sent to Porto Rico, it was reported with apparent official sanction that the objective point was San Juan, which Admiral Sampson would cover with the guns of his fleet while a landing was being made by the troops. This, however, was a ruse to mislead the Spanish spies in New York and Washington, and while the Spaniards in San Juan were completing preparations to resist invasion, General Miles quietly debarked his army at Guanica on July 25, opposed only by a small force of Spaniards in a block-house. On the following day the Americans advanced to Yamo, and captured the railroad leading into Ponce. By July 29 all of the Americans, numbering 16,973 officers and men, had landed and concentrated
Nelson A. Miles (search for this): entry guanica
about 15 miles from the city of Ponce, Porto Rico. In the early part of the war between the United States and Spain (1898), when it became known that a military expedition under Gen. Nelson A. Miles (q. v.) was to be sent to Porto Rico, it was reported with apparent official sanction that the objective point was San Juan, which Admiral Sampson would cover with the guns of his fleet while a landing was being made by the troops. This, however, was a ruse to mislead the Spanish spies in New York and Washington, and while the Spaniards in San Juan were completing preparations to resist invasion, General Miles quietly debarked his army at Guanica on July 25, opposed only by a small force of Spaniards in a block-house. On the following day the Americans advanced to Yamo, and captured the railroad leading into Ponce. By July 29 all of the Americans, numbering 16,973 officers and men, had landed and concentrated in the neighborhood of Ponce for a forward movement against San Juan(q. v.).
Guanica, A seaport in the southwestern corner of the province of Ponce, about 15 miles from the city of Ponce, Porto Rico. In the early part of the war between the United States and Spain (1898), when it became known that a military expedition under Gen. Nelson A. Miles (q. v.) was to be sent to Porto Rico, it was reported with apparent official sanction that the objective point was San Juan, which Admiral Sampson would cover with the guns of his fleet while a landing was being made by the troops. This, however, was a ruse to mislead the Spanish spies in New York and Washington, and while the Spaniards in San Juan were completing preparations to resist invasion, General Miles quietly debarked his army at Guanica on July 25, opposed only by a small force of Spaniards in a block-house. On the following day the Americans advanced to Yamo, and captured the railroad leading into Ponce. By July 29 all of the Americans, numbering 16,973 officers and men, had landed and concentrated i
about 15 miles from the city of Ponce, Porto Rico. In the early part of the war between the United States and Spain (1898), when it became known that a military expedition under Gen. Nelson A. Miles (q. v.) was to be sent to Porto Rico, it was reported with apparent official sanction that the objective point was San Juan, which Admiral Sampson would cover with the guns of his fleet while a landing was being made by the troops. This, however, was a ruse to mislead the Spanish spies in New York and Washington, and while the Spaniards in San Juan were completing preparations to resist invasion, General Miles quietly debarked his army at Guanica on July 25, opposed only by a small force of Spaniards in a block-house. On the following day the Americans advanced to Yamo, and captured the railroad leading into Ponce. By July 29 all of the Americans, numbering 16,973 officers and men, had landed and concentrated in the neighborhood of Ponce for a forward movement against San Juan(q. v.).
1 2