hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 52 total hits in 31 results.

1 2 3 4
the capture of Mazatlan, and was made lieutenant-governor. From Aug. 13, 1847, to Dec. 20, 1849, he was secretary of the province and Territory of California, and had a large share in preparing the State constitution. He left the army in 1854, and began the practice of law in San Francisco. In August, 1861, he was appointed a major-general of the regular army, and succeeded Fremont in command of the Western Department in November. In 1862 he took command of the army before Corinth, and in July of that year he was appointed general-in-chief, and held that post until superseded by Grant, when he became chief of staff of the army, remaining such till April, 1865, when he was placed in command of the Military Division of the James, with his headquarters at Richmond. In August he was transferred to the Division of the Pacific, and in March, 1869, to that of the South, with headquarters at Louisville, where he died Jan. 9, 1872. General Halleck published several works upon military and
atlan, and was made lieutenant-governor. From Aug. 13, 1847, to Dec. 20, 1849, he was secretary of the province and Territory of California, and had a large share in preparing the State constitution. He left the army in 1854, and began the practice of law in San Francisco. In August, 1861, he was appointed a major-general of the regular army, and succeeded Fremont in command of the Western Department in November. In 1862 he took command of the army before Corinth, and in July of that year he was appointed general-in-chief, and held that post until superseded by Grant, when he became chief of staff of the army, remaining such till April, 1865, when he was placed in command of the Military Division of the James, with his headquarters at Richmond. In August he was transferred to the Division of the Pacific, and in March, 1869, to that of the South, with headquarters at Louisville, where he died Jan. 9, 1872. General Halleck published several works upon military and scientific topics.
istinguished himself. He was on the staff of Commodore Shubrick at the capture of Mazatlan, and was made lieutenant-governor. From Aug. 13, 1847, to Dec. 20, 1849, he was secretary of the province and Territory of California, and had a large share in preparing the State constitution. He left the army in 1854, and began the practice of law in San Francisco. In August, 1861, he was appointed a major-general of the regular army, and succeeded Fremont in command of the Western Department in November. In 1862 he took command of the army before Corinth, and in July of that year he was appointed general-in-chief, and held that post until superseded by Grant, when he became chief of staff of the army, remaining such till April, 1865, when he was placed in command of the Military Division of the James, with his headquarters at Richmond. In August he was transferred to the Division of the Pacific, and in March, 1869, to that of the South, with headquarters at Louisville, where he died Jan.
Halleck, Henry wager 1815- Military officer; born in Westernville, Oneida co., N. Y., Jan. 16, 1815; graduated at West Point in 1839, entering the engineer corps. Until June, 1840, he was assistant professor at West Point, and from 1841 to 1844 was employed on the fortifications in New York Harbor. In 1845 he visited the military establishments of Europe. In the winter of 1845-46 he delivered at the Lowell Institute, Boston, a series of lectures on the science of war, afterwards published in book form with the title of Elements of military art and Science. He served in California and on the Pacific coast during the war with Mexico, in which he distinguished himself. He was on the staff of Commodore Shubrick at the capture of Mazatlan, and was made lieutenant-governor. From Aug. 13, 1847, to Dec. 20, 1849, he was secretary of the province and Territory of California, and had a large share in preparing the State constitution. He left the army in 1854, and began the practice
January 16th, 1815 AD (search for this): entry halleck-henry-wager
Halleck, Henry wager 1815- Military officer; born in Westernville, Oneida co., N. Y., Jan. 16, 1815; graduated at West Point in 1839, entering the engineer corps. Until June, 1840, he was assistant professor at West Point, and from 1841 to 1844 was employed on the fortifications in New York Harbor. In 1845 he visited the military establishments of Europe. In the winter of 1845-46 he delivered at the Lowell Institute, Boston, a series of lectures on the science of war, afterwards published in book form with the title of Elements of military art and Science. He served in California and on the Pacific coast during the war with Mexico, in which he distinguished himself. He was on the staff of Commodore Shubrick at the capture of Mazatlan, and was made lieutenant-governor. From Aug. 13, 1847, to Dec. 20, 1849, he was secretary of the province and Territory of California, and had a large share in preparing the State constitution. He left the army in 1854, and began the practice
Halleck, Henry wager 1815- Military officer; born in Westernville, Oneida co., N. Y., Jan. 16, 1815; graduated at West Point in 1839, entering the engineer corps. Until June, 1840, he was assistant professor at West Point, and from 1841 to 1844 was employed on the fortifications in New York Harbor. In 1845 he visited the military establishments of Europe. In the winter of 1845-46 he delivered at the Lowell Institute, Boston, a series of lectures on the science of war, afterwards published in book form with the title of Elements of military art and Science. He served in California and on the Pacific coast during the war with Mexico, in which he distinguished himself. He was on the staff of Commodore Shubrick at the capture of Mazatlan, and was made lieutenant-governor. From Aug. 13, 1847, to Dec. 20, 1849, he was secretary of the province and Territory of California, and had a large share in preparing the State constitution. He left the army in 1854, and began the practice
Halleck, Henry wager 1815- Military officer; born in Westernville, Oneida co., N. Y., Jan. 16, 1815; graduated at West Point in 1839, entering the engineer corps. Until June, 1840, he was assistant professor at West Point, and from 1841 to 1844 was employed on the fortifications in New York Harbor. In 1845 he visited the military establishments of Europe. In the winter of 1845-46 he delivered at the Lowell Institute, Boston, a series of lectures on the science of war, afterwards published in book form with the title of Elements of military art and Science. He served in California and on the Pacific coast during the war with Mexico, in which he distinguished himself. He was on the staff of Commodore Shubrick at the capture of Mazatlan, and was made lieutenant-governor. From Aug. 13, 1847, to Dec. 20, 1849, he was secretary of the province and Territory of California, and had a large share in preparing the State constitution. He left the army in 1854, and began the practice
Halleck, Henry wager 1815- Military officer; born in Westernville, Oneida co., N. Y., Jan. 16, 1815; graduated at West Point in 1839, entering the engineer corps. Until June, 1840, he was assistant professor at West Point, and from 1841 to 1844 was employed on the fortifications in New York Harbor. In 1845 he visited the military establishments of Europe. In the winter of 1845-46 he delivered at the Lowell Institute, Boston, a series of lectures on the science of war, afterwards published in book form with the title of Elements of military art and Science. He served in California and on the Pacific coast during the war with Mexico, in which he distinguished himself. He was on the staff of Commodore Shubrick at the capture of Mazatlan, and was made lieutenant-governor. From Aug. 13, 1847, to Dec. 20, 1849, he was secretary of the province and Territory of California, and had a large share in preparing the State constitution. He left the army in 1854, and began the practice
Halleck, Henry wager 1815- Military officer; born in Westernville, Oneida co., N. Y., Jan. 16, 1815; graduated at West Point in 1839, entering the engineer corps. Until June, 1840, he was assistant professor at West Point, and from 1841 to 1844 was employed on the fortifications in New York Harbor. In 1845 he visited the military establishments of Europe. In the winter of 1845-46 he delivered at the Lowell Institute, Boston, a series of lectures on the science of war, afterwards published in book form with the title of Elements of military art and Science. He served in California and on the Pacific coast during the war with Mexico, in which he distinguished himself. He was on the staff of Commodore Shubrick at the capture of Mazatlan, and was made lieutenant-governor. From Aug. 13, 1847, to Dec. 20, 1849, he was secretary of the province and Territory of California, and had a large share in preparing the State constitution. He left the army in 1854, and began the practice
rnville, Oneida co., N. Y., Jan. 16, 1815; graduated at West Point in 1839, entering the engineer corps. Until June, 1840, he was assistant professor at West Point, and from 1841 to 1844 was employed on the fortifications in New York Harbor. In 1845 he visited the military establishments of Europe. In the winter of 1845-46 he delivered at the Lowell Institute, Boston, a series of lectures on the science of war, afterwards published in book form with the title of Elements of military art and 1845-46 he delivered at the Lowell Institute, Boston, a series of lectures on the science of war, afterwards published in book form with the title of Elements of military art and Science. He served in California and on the Pacific coast during the war with Mexico, in which he distinguished himself. He was on the staff of Commodore Shubrick at the capture of Mazatlan, and was made lieutenant-governor. From Aug. 13, 1847, to Dec. 20, 1849, he was secretary of the province and Territory of California, and had a large share in preparing the State constitution. He left the army in 1854, and began the practice of law in San Francisco. In August, 1861, he was appointed a m
1 2 3 4