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Huguenot (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry hamilton-alexander
Hamilton, Alexander 1757- Statesman; born in Nevis, W. I., Jan. 11, 1757. His father was a Scotchman; his mother, of Huguenot descent. He came to the English-American colonies in 1772, and attended a school kept by Francis Barber at Elizabeth, N. J., and entered King's (Columbia) College in 1773. He made a speech to a popular assemblage in New York City in 1774, when only seventeen years of age, remarkable in every particular, and he aided the patriotic cause by his writings. In March, 1776, he was made captain of artillery, and served at White Plains, Trenton, and Princeton; and in March, 1777, became aide-de-camp to Washington, and his secretary and trusted confidant. He was of great assistance to Washington in his correspondence, and in planning campaigns. In December, 1780, he married a daughter of Gen. Philip Schuyler, and in 1781 he retired from Washington's staff. In July he was appointed to the command of New York troops, with the rank of colonel, and captured by as
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry hamilton-alexander
ed as follows: New Hampshire, $300,000; Massachusetts. $4,000,000; Rhode Island, $200,000; Connecticut, $1,600,000; New York, $1,200,000; New Jersey, $800,000; Pennsylvania, $2,200,000; Delaware, $200,000; Maryland, $800,000; Virginia. $3,000,000: North Carolina, $2,400,000: South Carolina, $4,000,000: Georgia. $300,000. Long and old Seville piece of eight reals, of the value of four shillings and sixpence sterling, is evidently contemplated. The computed par between Great Britain and Pennsylvania will serve as an example. According to that, one hundred pounds sterling is equal to one hundred and sixty-six pounds and two-thirds of a pound, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania currency; which corresponds with the proportion between 4s. 6d. sterling and 7s. 6d., the current value of the dollar in that State by invariable usage. And, as far as the information of the Secretary goes, the same comparison holds in the other States. But this circumstance in favor of the dollar loses much of its weight from
Chambersburg (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry hamilton-alexander
1757. His father was a Scotchman; his mother, of Huguenot descent. He came to the English-American colonies in 1772, and attended a school kept by Francis Barber at Elizabeth, N. J., and entered King's (Columbia) College in 1773. He made a speech to a popular assemblage in New York City in 1774, when only seventeen years of age, remarkable in every particular, and he aided the patriotic cause by his writings. In March, 1776, he was made captain of artillery, and served at White Plains, Trenton, and Princeton; and in March, 1777, became aide-de-camp to Washington, and his secretary and trusted confidant. He was of great assistance to Washington in his correspondence, and in planning campaigns. In December, 1780, he married a daughter of Gen. Philip Schuyler, and in 1781 he retired from Washington's staff. In July he was appointed to the command of New York troops, with the rank of colonel, and captured by assault a redoubt at Yorktown, Oct. 14, 1781. After the surrender of Cor
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry hamilton-alexander
in of artillery, and served at White Plains, Trenton, and Princeton; and in March, 1777, became aide-de-camp to Washington, and his secretary and trusted confidant. He was of great assistance to Washington in his correspondence, and in planning campaigns. In December, 1780, he married a daughter of Gen. Philip Schuyler, and in 1781 he retired from Washington's staff. In July he was appointed to the command of New York troops, with the rank of colonel, and captured by assault a redoubt at Yorktown, Oct. 14, 1781. After the surrender of Cornwallis he left the army; studied law; was a member of Congress (1782- 83), and soon took the lead in his profession. He was a member of the New York legislature in 1787, and of the convention at Philadelphia, that year, that framed the national Constitution. With the aid of the able pens of Madison and Jay, Hamilton put forth a series of remarkable essays in favor of the Constitution, which, in book form, bear the name of The Federalist. Hamilt
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry hamilton-alexander
riod for the general welfare. The foreign debt, with accrued interest, amounting to almost $12,000,000, was due chiefly to France and private lenders in Holland. The domestic debt, including outstanding Continental money and interest, amounted to over $42,000,000, nearly one-third of which was accumulated accrued interest. The State debts assumed amounted in the aggregate to $21,000,000, distributed as follows: New Hampshire, $300,000; Massachusetts. $4,000,000; Rhode Island, $200,000; Connecticut, $1,600,000; New York, $1,200,000; New Jersey, $800,000; Pennsylvania, $2,200,000; Delaware, $200,000; Maryland, $800,000; Virginia. $3,000,000: North Carolina, $2,400,000: South Carolina, $4,000,000: Georgia. $300,000. Long and earnest debates on this report occurred in and out of Congress. There was but one opinion about the foreign debt, and the President was authorized to borrow $12,000,000 to pay it with. As to the domestic debt. there was a wide difference of opinion. The Conti
Amsterdam (Netherlands) (search for this): entry hamilton-alexander
ty on which the Secretary places reliance, the standard of Spain for its silver coin, in the year 1761, was 261 parts fine and 27 parts alloy, at which proportion a dollar of 17 dwt. 8 grains would consist of 377 grains of fine silver and 39 grains of alloy. But there is no question that this standard has been since altered considerably for the worse,—to what precise point is not as well ascertained as could be wished; but, from a computation of the value of dollars in the markets both of Amsterdam and London (a criterion which cannot materially mislead) the new dollar appears to contain about 368 grains of fine silver, and that which immediately preceded it about 374 grains. In this state of things there is some difficulty in defining the dollar which is to be understood as constituting the present money unit, on the supposition of its being most applicable to that species of coin. The old Seville piece of 386 grains and 15 mites fine comports best with the computations of forei
Princeton, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry hamilton-alexander
ther was a Scotchman; his mother, of Huguenot descent. He came to the English-American colonies in 1772, and attended a school kept by Francis Barber at Elizabeth, N. J., and entered King's (Columbia) College in 1773. He made a speech to a popular assemblage in New York City in 1774, when only seventeen years of age, remarkable in every particular, and he aided the patriotic cause by his writings. In March, 1776, he was made captain of artillery, and served at White Plains, Trenton, and Princeton; and in March, 1777, became aide-de-camp to Washington, and his secretary and trusted confidant. He was of great assistance to Washington in his correspondence, and in planning campaigns. In December, 1780, he married a daughter of Gen. Philip Schuyler, and in 1781 he retired from Washington's staff. In July he was appointed to the command of New York troops, with the rank of colonel, and captured by assault a redoubt at Yorktown, Oct. 14, 1781. After the surrender of Cornwallis he lef
actice. The manner of adjusting foreign exchanges would seem to indicate the dollar as best entitled to that character. In these the old piaster of Spain or old Seville piece of eight reals, of the value of four shillings and sixpence sterling, is evidently contemplated. The computed par between Great Britain and Pennsylvania wiing the dollar which is to be understood as constituting the present money unit, on the supposition of its being most applicable to that species of coin. The old Seville piece of 386 grains and 15 mites fine comports best with the computations of foreign exchanges, and with the more ancient contracts respecting landed property; bbout 1 to 14 4/5. But that statement has proceeded upon the idea of the ancient dollar. One pennyweight of gold of twenty-two carats fine at 6s. 8d. and the old Seville piece of 386 grains and 15 mites of pure silver at 7s. 6d. furnish the exact ratio of 1 to 15.6262. But this does not coincide with the real difference between t
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry hamilton-alexander
nd. The domestic debt, including outstanding Continental money and interest, amounted to over $42,000,000, nearly one-third of which was accumulated accrued interest. The State debts assumed amounted in the aggregate to $21,000,000, distributed as follows: New Hampshire, $300,000; Massachusetts. $4,000,000; Rhode Island, $200,000; Connecticut, $1,600,000; New York, $1,200,000; New Jersey, $800,000; Pennsylvania, $2,200,000; Delaware, $200,000; Maryland, $800,000; Virginia. $3,000,000: North Carolina, $2,400,000: South Carolina, $4,000,000: Georgia. $300,000. Long and earnest debates on this report occurred in and out of Congress. There was but one opinion about the foreign debt, and the President was authorized to borrow $12,000,000 to pay it with. As to the domestic debt. there was a wide difference of opinion. The Continental bills, government certificates, and other evidences of debt were mostly held by speculators, who had purchased them at greatly reduced rates; and many
from Washington's staff. In July he was appointed to the command of New York troops, with the rank of colonel, and captured by assault a redoubt at Yorktown, Oct. 14, 1781. After the surrender of Cornwallis he left the army; studied law; was a member of Congress (1782- 83), and soon took the lead in his profession. He was a member of the New York legislature in 1787, and of the convention at Philadelphia, that year, that framed the national Constitution. With the aid of the able pens of Madison and Jay, Hamilton put forth a series of remarkable essays in favor of the Constitution, which, in book form, bear the name of The Federalist. Hamilton wrote the larger half of that work. He was called to the cabinet of Washington as Secretary of the Treasury, and was the founder of the financial system of the republic. Having finished the great work of assisting to put in motion the machinery of the government of the United States, and seeing it in successful working order, he resigned,
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