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assemblage in New York City in 1774, when only seventeen years of age, remarkable in every particular, and he aided the patriotic cause by his writings. In March, 1776, he was made captain of artillery, and served at White Plains, Trenton, and Princeton; and in March, 1777, became aide-de-camp to Washington, and his secretary and trusted confidant. He was of great assistance to Washington in his correspondence, and in planning campaigns. In December, 1780, he married a daughter of Gen. Philip Schuyler, and in 1781 he retired from Washington's staff. In July he was appointed to the command of New York troops, with the rank of colonel, and captured by assault a redoubt at Yorktown, Oct. 14, 1781. After the surrender of Cornwallis he left the army; studied law; was a member of Congress (1782- 83), and soon took the lead in his profession. He was a member of the New York legislature in 1787, and of the convention at Philadelphia, that year, that framed the national Constitution. Wi
Hamilton, Alexander 1757- Statesman; born in Nevis, W. I., Jan. 11, 1757. His father was a Scotchman; his mother, of Huguenot descent. He came to the English-American colonies in 1772, and attended a school kept by Francis Barber at Elizabeth, N. J., and entered King's (Columbia) College in 1773. He made a speech to a popular assemblage in New York City in 1774, when only seventeen years of age, remarkable in every particular, and he aided the patriotic cause by his writings. In March, 1776, he was made captain of artillery, and served at White Plains, Trenton, and Princeton; and in March, 1777, became aide-de-camp to Washington, and his secretary and trusted confidant. He was of great assistance to Washington in his correspondence, and in planning campaigns. In December, 1780, he married a daughter of Gen. Philip Schuyler, and in 1781 he retired from Washington's staff. In July he was appointed to the command of New York troops, with the rank of colonel, and captured by a
of law; but his pen was much employed in support of the policy of the national government. When, in 1798, war with France seemed probable, and President Adams appointed Washington commander-in-chief of the armies of the republic, Hamilton was made his second in command, with the rank of major-general. On the death of Washington (December, 1799), Hamilton A. Hamilton succeeded him as commander-in-chief, but the provisional army was soon disbanded. On Sept. 3, 1780, Hamilton wrote to Duane, a member of Congress from New York, and expressed his views on the subject of State supremacy and a national government. He proposed to call for a convention of all the States on Nov. 1 following, with full authority to conclude, finally, upon a general confederation. He traced the cause of the want of power in Congress, and censured that body for its timidity in refusing to assume authority to preserve the infant republic from harm. Undefined powers, he said, are discretionary powers,
discussed, and Hamilton, in a speech, spoke of Burr as an unsuitable candidate, because no relianceaced in Mr. Burr. In the election which ensued Burr was defeated, and, though Hamilton had taken noart in the canvass, his influence was such that Burr attributed his defeat to him. Burr, defeated anof Judge Taylor, where Hamilton spoke freely of Burr's political conduct and principles only, to whished letters, said: Duel between Hamilton and Burr. Hamilton and Kent both consider Burr, politicaBurr, politically, as a dangerous man, and unfit for the office of governor. He also wrote that Hamilton and Kentpicable opinion which Hamilton had expressed of Burr. The latter made these private expressions of political topics, and did not attribute to Colonel Burr any instance of dishonorable conduct, nor r. This was all an honorable man could ask. But Burr seemed to thirst for Hamilton's life, and he pritement, without regard to party, was intense. Burr fled from New York and became for a while a fug[7 more...]
Hamilton, Alexander 1757- Statesman; born in Nevis, W. I., Jan. 11, 1757. His father was a Scotchman; his mother, of Huguenot descent. He came to the English- the national Constitution. With the aid of the able pens of Madison and Jay, Hamilton put forth a series of remarkable essays in favor of the Constitution, which, in book form, bear the name of The Federalist. Hamilton wrote the larger half of that work. He was called to the cabinet of Washington as Secretary of the Treasury, t Adams appointed Washington commander-in-chief of the armies of the republic, Hamilton was made his second in command, with the rank of major-general. On the death of Washington (December, 1799), Hamilton A. Hamilton succeeded him as commander-in-chief, but the provisional army was soon disbanded. On Sept. 3, 1780, HamiltA. Hamilton succeeded him as commander-in-chief, but the provisional army was soon disbanded. On Sept. 3, 1780, Hamilton wrote to Duane, a member of Congress from New York, and expressed his views on the subject of State supremacy and a national government. He proposed to call for
He was called to the cabinet of Washington as Secretary of the Treasury, and was the founder of the financial system of the republic. Having finished the great work of assisting to put in motion the machinery of the government of the United States, and seeing it in successful working order, he resigned, Jan. 31, 1795, and resumed the practice of law; but his pen was much employed in support of the policy of the national government. When, in 1798, war with France seemed probable, and President Adams appointed Washington commander-in-chief of the armies of the republic, Hamilton was made his second in command, with the rank of major-general. On the death of Washington (December, 1799), Hamilton A. Hamilton succeeded him as commander-in-chief, but the provisional army was soon disbanded. On Sept. 3, 1780, Hamilton wrote to Duane, a member of Congress from New York, and expressed his views on the subject of State supremacy and a national government. He proposed to call for a
ylor, where Hamilton spoke freely of Burr's political conduct and principles only, to which he declared himself hostile. Dr. Cooper, in his zeal, just before the election, in published letters, said: Duel between Hamilton and Burr. Hamilton and Kent both consider Burr, politically, as a dangerous man, and unfit for the office of governor. He also wrote that Hamilton and Kent both thought that Burr ought not to be trusted with the reins of government, and added, I could detail a still more deKent both thought that Burr ought not to be trusted with the reins of government, and added, I could detail a still more despicable opinion which Hamilton had expressed of Burr. The latter made these private expressions of Hamilton concerning his political character a pretext for a challenge to mortal combat; and, seizing upon the word despicable, sent a note to Hamilton, demanding a prompt and unqualified acknowledgment or denial of having said anything which warranted such an expression. Several notes passed between Hamilton and Burr, through the hands of friends, in one of which Hamilton frankly said that the
ut regard to party, was intense. Burr fled from New York and became for a while a fugitive from justice. He was politically dead, and bore the burden of scorn and remorse for more than thirty years. Report on the coinage.—On Jan. 28, 1791, Secretary Hamilton sent the following report to the House of Representatives: The Secretary of the Treasury having attentively considered the subject referred to Where Hamilton fell. him by the order of the House of Representatives of the 15th of April last, relatively to the establishment of a mint, most respectfully submits the result of his inquiries and reflections. A plan for an establishment of this nature involves a great variety of considerations—intricate, nice, and important. The general state of debtor and creditor; all the relations and consequences of price; the essential interests of trade and industry; the value of all property; the whole income, both of the State and of the individuals—are liable to be sensibly infl<
Hamilton, Alexander 1757- Statesman; born in Nevis, W. I., Jan. 11, 1757. His father was a Scotchman; his mother, of Huguenot descent. He came to the English-American colonies in 1772, and attended a school kept by Francis Barber at Elizabeth, N. J., and entered King's (Columbia) College in 1773. He made a speech to a popular assemblage in New York City in 1774, when only seventeen years of age, remarkable in every particular, and he aided the patriotic cause by his writings. In March, 1776, he was made captain of artillery, and served at White Plains, Trenton, and Princeton; and in March, 1777, became aide-de-camp to Washington, and his secretary and trusted confidant. He was of great assistance to Washington in his correspondence, and in planning campaigns. In December, 1780, he married a daughter of Gen. Philip Schuyler, and in 1781 he retired from Washington's staff. In July he was appointed to the command of New York troops, with the rank of colonel, and captured by a
January 28th, 1791 AD (search for this): entry hamilton-alexander
could not decline. They fought at Weehawken, July 11, 1804, on the west side of the Hudson River, and Hamilton, who would not discharge his pistol at Burr, for he did not wish to hurt him, was mortally wounded, and died the next day. The public excitement, without regard to party, was intense. Burr fled from New York and became for a while a fugitive from justice. He was politically dead, and bore the burden of scorn and remorse for more than thirty years. Report on the coinage.—On Jan. 28, 1791, Secretary Hamilton sent the following report to the House of Representatives: The Secretary of the Treasury having attentively considered the subject referred to Where Hamilton fell. him by the order of the House of Representatives of the 15th of April last, relatively to the establishment of a mint, most respectfully submits the result of his inquiries and reflections. A plan for an establishment of this nature involves a great variety of considerations—intricate, nice, and
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