hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 28 total hits in 9 results.

September 4th, 1812 AD (search for this): entry harrison-fort-ind
ed by Capt. Zachary Taylor (afterwards President of the United States), who was just recovering from a severe illness. He had been warned by friendly Indians to be on his guard. His garrison was weak, for of the fifty men who composed it not more than a dozen were exempt from the prevailing fever. Only two non-commissioned officers and six privates could mount guard at the same time. In the presence of impending danger some of the convalescents went upon duty freely. At midnight on Sept. 4, 1812, the Indians stealthily approached the fort and set fire to one of the block-houses, which contained the stores of the garrison. At the same time they furiously attacked the fort with muskets. So feeble in body were the garrison that it was found difficult to keep the flames of the block-house under, and the horrid yells of the Indians made them feel that all was lost, and that they must give up in despair. Two of the stoutest soldiers deserted the post and tried to escape. One was c
Harrison, Fort, Ind. A defensive post on the Wabash River, near Terre Haute, Ind. At the very hour when the Pigeon Roost massacre occurred (see Wayne, Fort), two young haymakers were killed and scalped near Fort Harrison. The Prophet (see Elkswatawa) at Tippecanoe was still busy stirring up the Indians against the white people. The garrison of Fort Harrison was commanded by Capt. Zachary Taylor (afterwards President of the United States), who was just recovering from a severe illness. He had been warned by friendly Indians to be on his guard. His garrison was weak, for of the fifty men who composed it not more than a dozen were exempt from the prevailing fever. Only two non-commissioned officers and six privates could mount guard at the same time. In the presence of impending danger some of the convalescents went upon duty freely. At midnight on Sept. 4, 1812, the Indians stealthily approached the fort and set fire to one of the block-houses, which contained the stores of
use under, and the horrid yells of the Indians made them feel that all was lost, and that they must give up in despair. Two of the stoutest soldiers deserted the post and tried to escape. One was cut in pieces and the other returned. Nothing but the prudence, valor, and presence of mind of the commander saved the post. The fire was subdued by great exertions. At six o'clock Fort Harrison, on the Wabash. the next morning the garrison returned the fire of the assailants so briskly that the latter retired out of reach of the guns, after a contest of almost eight hours. They destroyed or drove off the live-stock found in the neighborhood, and for a while after the Indians abandoned the siege the garrison subsisted on green corn from the fields around, which the Indians had spared. Soon afterwards General Hopkins, with Kentucky volunteers, gave ample relief to the sick and weary soldiers at Fort Harrison. Their entire loss in the siege was only three men killed and three wounded.
Harrison, Fort, Ind. A defensive post on the Wabash River, near Terre Haute, Ind. At the very hour when the Pigeon Roost massacre occurred (see Wayne, Fort), two young haymakers were killed and scalped near Fort Harrison. The Prophet (see Elkswatawa) at Tippecanoe was still busy stirring up the Indians against the white people. The garrison of Fort Harrison was commanded by Capt. Zachary Taylor (afterwards President of the United States), who was just recovering from a severe illness. He had been warned by friendly Indians to be on his guard. His garrison was weak, for of the fifty men who composed it not more than a dozen were exempt from the prevailing fever. Only two non-commissioned officers and six privates could mount guard at the same time. In the presence of impending danger some of the convalescents went upon duty freely. At midnight on Sept. 4, 1812, the Indians stealthily approached the fort and set fire to one of the block-houses, which contained the stores of
Tippecanoe (Indiana, United States) (search for this): entry harrison-fort-ind
Harrison, Fort, Ind. A defensive post on the Wabash River, near Terre Haute, Ind. At the very hour when the Pigeon Roost massacre occurred (see Wayne, Fort), two young haymakers were killed and scalped near Fort Harrison. The Prophet (see Elkswatawa) at Tippecanoe was still busy stirring up the Indians against the white people. The garrison of Fort Harrison was commanded by Capt. Zachary Taylor (afterwards President of the United States), who was just recovering from a severe illness. He had been warned by friendly Indians to be on his guard. His garrison was weak, for of the fifty men who composed it not more than a dozen were exempt from the prevailing fever. Only two non-commissioned officers and six privates could mount guard at the same time. In the presence of impending danger some of the convalescents went upon duty freely. At midnight on Sept. 4, 1812, the Indians stealthily approached the fort and set fire to one of the block-houses, which contained the stores of
Ouabache (United States) (search for this): entry harrison-fort-ind
Harrison, Fort, Ind. A defensive post on the Wabash River, near Terre Haute, Ind. At the very hour when the Pigeon Roost massacre occurred (see Wayne, Fort), two young haymakers were killed and scalped near Fort Harrison. The Prophet (see Elkswatawa) at Tippecanoe was still busy stirring up the Indians against the white people. The garrison of Fort Harrison was commanded by Capt. Zachary Taylor (afterwards President of the United States), who was just recovering from a severe illness. He had been warned by friendly Indians to be on his guard. His garrison was weak, for of the fifty men who composed it not more than a dozen were exempt from the prevailing fever. Only two non-commissioned officers and six privates could mount guard at the same time. In the presence of impending danger some of the convalescents went upon duty freely. At midnight on Sept. 4, 1812, the Indians stealthily approached the fort and set fire to one of the block-houses, which contained the stores of
United States (United States) (search for this): entry harrison-fort-ind
Harrison, Fort, Ind. A defensive post on the Wabash River, near Terre Haute, Ind. At the very hour when the Pigeon Roost massacre occurred (see Wayne, Fort), two young haymakers were killed and scalped near Fort Harrison. The Prophet (see Elkswatawa) at Tippecanoe was still busy stirring up the Indians against the white people. The garrison of Fort Harrison was commanded by Capt. Zachary Taylor (afterwards President of the United States), who was just recovering from a severe illness. He had been warned by friendly Indians to be on his guard. His garrison was weak, for of the fifty men who composed it not more than a dozen were exempt from the prevailing fever. Only two non-commissioned officers and six privates could mount guard at the same time. In the presence of impending danger some of the convalescents went upon duty freely. At midnight on Sept. 4, 1812, the Indians stealthily approached the fort and set fire to one of the block-houses, which contained the stores of
Terre Haute (Indiana, United States) (search for this): entry harrison-fort-ind
Harrison, Fort, Ind. A defensive post on the Wabash River, near Terre Haute, Ind. At the very hour when the Pigeon Roost massacre occurred (see Wayne, Fort), two young haymakers were killed and scalped near Fort Harrison. The Prophet (see Elkswatawa) at Tippecanoe was still busy stirring up the Indians against the white people. The garrison of Fort Harrison was commanded by Capt. Zachary Taylor (afterwards President of the United States), who was just recovering from a severe illness. He had been warned by friendly Indians to be on his guard. His garrison was weak, for of the fifty men who composed it not more than a dozen were exempt from the prevailing fever. Only two non-commissioned officers and six privates could mount guard at the same time. In the presence of impending danger some of the convalescents went upon duty freely. At midnight on Sept. 4, 1812, the Indians stealthily approached the fort and set fire to one of the block-houses, which contained the stores of
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry harrison-fort-ind
very hour when the Pigeon Roost massacre occurred (see Wayne, Fort), two young haymakers were killed and scalped near Fort Harrison. The Prophet (see Elkswatawa) at Tippecanoe was still busy stirring up the Indians against the white people. The garrison of Fort Harrison was commanded by Capt. Zachary Taylor (afterwards President of the United States), who was just recovering from a severe illness. He had been warned by friendly Indians to be on his guard. His garrison was weak, for of the or, and presence of mind of the commander saved the post. The fire was subdued by great exertions. At six o'clock Fort Harrison, on the Wabash. the next morning the garrison returned the fire of the assailants so briskly that the latter retired fields around, which the Indians had spared. Soon afterwards General Hopkins, with Kentucky volunteers, gave ample relief to the sick and weary soldiers at Fort Harrison. Their entire loss in the siege was only three men killed and three wounded.