hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 20 total hits in 9 results.

Cherokee (Alabama, United States) (search for this): entry hillabee-towns-the
responded, and preparations were made for the transaction. Meanwhile Generals Cocke and White, ignorant of this measure, came down upon the Hillabees, and spread destruction in their path. Ockfuskee and Genalga, two deserted villages—one of thirty and the other of ninety houses— were laid in ashes; and on the morning of Nov. 18, the troops appeared before the principal town. The inhabitants were unsuspicious of danger, and made no resistance; yet General White, for the purpose of inspiring terror in the minds of the Creek nation, fell furiously upon the non-resistants, and murdered no less than sixty warriors. Then, with 250 widows and orphans as prisoners in his train, he returned to Fort Armstrong, a stronghold which the east Tennesseeans had built on the Coosa, in the present Cherokee county, Ala. The Hillabees, knowing no other American commander than Jackson, regarded this outrage as most foul perfidy on his part, and thenceforth they carried on the war with malignant f
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry hillabee-towns-the
Hillabee towns, the In 1813 there was an existing jealousy between the west Tennessee troops, under Generals Jackson and Coffee, and the east Tennessee troops, under Generals Cooke and White, both intent upon punishing the Creeks. After the battle of Talladega (q. v.), the Hillabee Creeks were disposed to peace, and offered to make terms with Jackson. He cordially responded, and preparations were made for the transaction. Meanwhile Generals Cocke and White, ignorant of this measure, cameast Tennessee troops, under Generals Cooke and White, both intent upon punishing the Creeks. After the battle of Talladega (q. v.), the Hillabee Creeks were disposed to peace, and offered to make terms with Jackson. He cordially responded, and preparations were made for the transaction. Meanwhile Generals Cocke and White, ignorant of this measure, came down upon the Hillabees, and spread destruction in their path. Ockfuskee and Genalga, two deserted villages—one of thirty and the other of ninety houses— were laid in ashes; and on the morning of Nov. 18, the troops appeared before the principal town. The inhabitants were unsuspicious of danger, and made no resistance; yet General White, for the purpose of inspiring terror in the minds of the Creek nation, fell furiously upon the non-resistants, and murdered no less than sixty warriors. Th
Hillabee towns, the In 1813 there was an existing jealousy between the west Tennessee troops, under Generals Jackson and Coffee, and the east Tennessee troops, under Generals Cooke and White, both intent upon punishing the Creeks. After the battle of Talladega (q. v.), the Hillabee Creeks were disposed to peace, and offered to make terms with Jackson. He cordially responded, and preparations were made for the transaction. Meanwhile Generals Cocke and White, ignorant of this measure, came down upon the Hillabees, and spread destruction in their path. Ockfuskee and Genalga, two deserted villages—one of thirty and the other of ninety houses— were laid in ashes; and on the morning of Nov. 18, the troops appeared before the principal town. The inhabitants were unsuspicious of danger, and made no resistance; yet General White, for the purpose of inspiring terror in the minds of the Creek nation, fell furiously upon the non-resistants, and murdered no less than sixty warriors. Th
n 1813 there was an existing jealousy between the west Tennessee troops, under Generals Jackson and Coffee, and the east Tennessee troops, under Generals Cooke and White, both intent upon punishing the Creeks. After the battle of Talladega (q. v.), the Hillabee Creeks were disposed to peace, and offered to make terms with Jackson. He cordially responded, and preparations were made for the transaction. Meanwhile Generals Cocke and White, ignorant of this measure, came down upon the Hillabees, and spread destruction in their path. Ockfuskee and Genalga, two deserted villages—one of thirty and the other of ninety houses— were laid in ashes; and on the morning of Nov. 18, the troops appeared before the principal town. The inhabitants were unsuspicious of danger, and made no resistance; yet General White, for the purpose of inspiring terror in the minds of the Creek nation, fell furiously upon the non-resistants, and murdered no less than sixty warriors. Then, with 250 widows and or
Philip St. George Cooke (search for this): entry hillabee-towns-the
Hillabee towns, the In 1813 there was an existing jealousy between the west Tennessee troops, under Generals Jackson and Coffee, and the east Tennessee troops, under Generals Cooke and White, both intent upon punishing the Creeks. After the battle of Talladega (q. v.), the Hillabee Creeks were disposed to peace, and offered to make terms with Jackson. He cordially responded, and preparations were made for the transaction. Meanwhile Generals Cocke and White, ignorant of this measure, came down upon the Hillabees, and spread destruction in their path. Ockfuskee and Genalga, two deserted villages—one of thirty and the other of ninety houses— were laid in ashes; and on the morning of Nov. 18, the troops appeared before the principal town. The inhabitants were unsuspicious of danger, and made no resistance; yet General White, for the purpose of inspiring terror in the minds of the Creek nation, fell furiously upon the non-resistants, and murdered no less than sixty warriors. Th
Hillabee towns, the In 1813 there was an existing jealousy between the west Tennessee troops, under Generals Jackson and Coffee, and the east Tennessee troops, under Generals Cooke and White, both intent upon punishing the Creeks. After the battle of Talladega (q. v.), the Hillabee Creeks were disposed to peace, and offered to make terms with Jackson. He cordially responded, and preparations were made for the transaction. Meanwhile Generals Cocke and White, ignorant of this measure, came down upon the Hillabees, and spread destruction in their path. Ockfuskee and Genalga, two deserted villages—one of thirty and the other of ninety houses— were laners in his train, he returned to Fort Armstrong, a stronghold which the east Tennesseeans had built on the Coosa, in the present Cherokee county, Ala. The Hillabees, knowing no other American commander than Jackson, regarded this outrage as most foul perfidy on his part, and thenceforth they carried on the war with malignant f
Hillabee towns, the In 1813 there was an existing jealousy between the west Tennessee troops, under Generals Jackson and Coffee, and the east Tennessee troops, under Generals Cooke and White, both intent upon punishing the Creeks. After the battle of Talladega (q. v.), the Hillabee Creeks were disposed to peace, and offered to make terms with Jackson. He cordially responded, and preparations were made for the transaction. Meanwhile Generals Cocke and White, ignorant of this measure, came down upon the Hillabees, and spread destruction in their path. Ockfuskee and Genalga, two deserted villages—one of thirty and the other of ninety houses— were laid in ashes; and on the morning of Nov. 18, the troops appeared before the principal town. The inhabitants were unsuspicious of danger, and made no resistance; yet General White, for the purpose of inspiring terror in the minds of the Creek nation, fell furiously upon the non-resistants, and murdered no less than sixty warriors. Th
Hillabee towns, the In 1813 there was an existing jealousy between the west Tennessee troops, under Generals Jackson and Coffee, and the east Tennessee troops, under Generals Cooke and White, both intent upon punishing the Creeks. After the battle of Talladega (q. v.), the Hillabee Creeks were disposed to peace, and offered to make terms with Jackson. He cordially responded, and preparations were made for the transaction. Meanwhile Generals Cocke and White, ignorant of this measure, came down upon the Hillabees, and spread destruction in their path. Ockfuskee and Genalga, two deserted villages—one of thirty and the other of ninety houses— were laid in ashes; and on the morning of Nov. 18, the troops appeared before the principal town. The inhabitants were unsuspicious of danger, and made no resistance; yet General White, for the purpose of inspiring terror in the minds of the Creek nation, fell furiously upon the non-resistants, and murdered no less than sixty warriors. Th
ntent upon punishing the Creeks. After the battle of Talladega (q. v.), the Hillabee Creeks were disposed to peace, and offered to make terms with Jackson. He cordially responded, and preparations were made for the transaction. Meanwhile Generals Cocke and White, ignorant of this measure, came down upon the Hillabees, and spread destruction in their path. Ockfuskee and Genalga, two deserted villages—one of thirty and the other of ninety houses— were laid in ashes; and on the morning of Nov. 18, the troops appeared before the principal town. The inhabitants were unsuspicious of danger, and made no resistance; yet General White, for the purpose of inspiring terror in the minds of the Creek nation, fell furiously upon the non-resistants, and murdered no less than sixty warriors. Then, with 250 widows and orphans as prisoners in his train, he returned to Fort Armstrong, a stronghold which the east Tennesseeans had built on the Coosa, in the present Cherokee county, Ala. The Hillabe