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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry holland-josiah-gilbert
e Berkshire Medical College in 1844; engaged in practice in Springfield, Mass., till 1847; then became a teacher in Richmond, Va., and in a few months was called to the superintendency of the public schools in Vicksburg, Miss. A year later he returned to Springfield, and was made associate editor of the Republican, and continued as such till 1866. In 1870 he became editor and part owner of Scribner's monthly. He made his advent as a book-maker in 1855, by reprinting his History of Western Massachusetts, which had appeared as contributions to the Republican. Later he published The Bay path: a colonial tale; Timothy Titcomb's letters to young people, married and single, which met with much success; Bitter sweet, a poem in dramatic form, which was even more popular than Titcomb's letters; Life of Abraham Lincoln; Kathrina: her life and mine in a poem; Lessons in life; The story of Sevenoaks; Nicholas Minturn, etc. He died in New York City, Oct. 12, 1881. The following is Dr. Holla
New England (United States) (search for this): entry holland-josiah-gilbert
Titcomb's letters to young people, married and single, which met with much success; Bitter sweet, a poem in dramatic form, which was even more popular than Titcomb's letters; Life of Abraham Lincoln; Kathrina: her life and mine in a poem; Lessons in life; The story of Sevenoaks; Nicholas Minturn, etc. He died in New York City, Oct. 12, 1881. The following is Dr. Holland's essay on American public education: A venerable gentleman who once occupied a prominent position in a leading New England college, was remarking recently upon the difficulty which he experienced in obtaining servants who would attend to their duties. He had just dismissed a girl of sixteen, who was so much above her business as to be intolerable. The girl's father, who was an Englishman, called upon him for an explanation. The employer told his story, every word of which the father received without question, and then remarked, with considerable vehemence: It is all owing to those cursed public schools.
United States (United States) (search for this): entry holland-josiah-gilbert
them disappointed and unhappy. They envy those whom they have been taught to consider above them, and learn to count their own lives a failure. Girls starve in a mean poverty, or do worse, because they are too proud to work in a chamber or go into a shop. American servants are obsolete; all common employments are at a discount; the professions are crowded to overflowing; the country throngs with demagogues, and a general discontent with a humble lot prevails, simply because the youth of America have had the idea drilled into them that to be in private life, in whatever condition, is to be, in some sense, a nobody. It is possible that the schools are not exclusively to blame for this state of things, and that our political harangues, and even our political institutions, have something to do with it. What we greatly need in this country is the inculcation of soberer views of life. Boys and girls are bred to discontent. Everybody is after a high place, and nearly everybody fail
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): entry holland-josiah-gilbert
Holland, Josiah Gilbert 1819-1881 Author; born in Belchertown, Mass., July 24, 1819; graduated at the Berkshire Medical College in 1844; engaged in practice in Springfield, Mass., till 1847; then became a teacher in Richmond, Va., and in a few months was called to the superintendency of the public schools in Vicksburg, Miss. A year later he returned to Springfield, and was made associate editor of the Republican, and continued as such till 1866. In 1870 he became editor and part owner of Scribner's monthly. He made his advent as a book-maker in 1855, by reprinting his History of Western Massachusetts, which had appeared as contributions to the Republican. Later he published The Bay path: a colonial tale; Timothy Titcomb's letters to young people, married and single, which met with much success; Bitter sweet, a poem in dramatic form, which was even more popular than Titcomb's letters; Life of Abraham Lincoln; Kathrina: her life and mine in a poem; Lessons in life; The story of
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry holland-josiah-gilbert
Holland, Josiah Gilbert 1819-1881 Author; born in Belchertown, Mass., July 24, 1819; graduated at the Berkshire Medical College in 1844; engaged in practice in Springfield, Mass., till 1847; then became a teacher in Richmond, Va., and in a few months was called to the superintendency of the public schools in Vicksburg, Miss. A year later he returned to Springfield, and was made associate editor of the Republican, and continued as such till 1866. In 1870 he became editor and part owner of Scribner's monthly. He made his advent as a book-maker in 1855, by reprinting his History of Western Massachusetts, which had appeared as contributions to the Republican. Later he published The Bay path: a colonial tale; Timothy Titcomb's letters to young people, married and single, which met with much success; Bitter sweet, a poem in dramatic form, which was even more popular than Titcomb's letters; Life of Abraham Lincoln; Kathrina: her life and mine in a poem; Lessons in life; The story of
Springfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry holland-josiah-gilbert
Holland, Josiah Gilbert 1819-1881 Author; born in Belchertown, Mass., July 24, 1819; graduated at the Berkshire Medical College in 1844; engaged in practice in Springfield, Mass., till 1847; then became a teacher in Richmond, Va., and in a few months was called to the superintendency of the public schools in Vicksburg, Miss. A year later he returned to Springfield, and was made associate editor of the Republican, and continued as such till 1866. In 1870 he became editor and part owner of Springfield, and was made associate editor of the Republican, and continued as such till 1866. In 1870 he became editor and part owner of Scribner's monthly. He made his advent as a book-maker in 1855, by reprinting his History of Western Massachusetts, which had appeared as contributions to the Republican. Later he published The Bay path: a colonial tale; Timothy Titcomb's letters to young people, married and single, which met with much success; Bitter sweet, a poem in dramatic form, which was even more popular than Titcomb's letters; Life of Abraham Lincoln; Kathrina: her life and mine in a poem; Lessons in life; The story of
Belchertown, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry holland-josiah-gilbert
Holland, Josiah Gilbert 1819-1881 Author; born in Belchertown, Mass., July 24, 1819; graduated at the Berkshire Medical College in 1844; engaged in practice in Springfield, Mass., till 1847; then became a teacher in Richmond, Va., and in a few months was called to the superintendency of the public schools in Vicksburg, Miss. A year later he returned to Springfield, and was made associate editor of the Republican, and continued as such till 1866. In 1870 he became editor and part owner of Scribner's monthly. He made his advent as a book-maker in 1855, by reprinting his History of Western Massachusetts, which had appeared as contributions to the Republican. Later he published The Bay path: a colonial tale; Timothy Titcomb's letters to young people, married and single, which met with much success; Bitter sweet, a poem in dramatic form, which was even more popular than Titcomb's letters; Life of Abraham Lincoln; Kathrina: her life and mine in a poem; Lessons in life; The story of
ary to become great men is to try for it, and each one supposes it possible for him to become governor of the State, or President of the Union. The idea of being educated to fill a humble office in life is hardly thought of, and every bumpkin who has a memory sufficient for the words repeats the stanza: Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime, And departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sand of time. There is a fine ring to this familiar quatrain of Mr. Longfellow, but it is nothing more than a musical cheat. It sounds like truth, but it is a lie. The lives of great men all remind us that they have made their own memory sublime, but they do not assure us at all that we can leave footprints like theirs behind us. If you do not believe it, go to the cemetery yonder. There they lie— 10,000 upturned faces—10,000 breathless bosoms. There was a time when fire flashed in those vacant orbits, and warm ambitions pulsed in those bosoms. Dreams of fame a
Josiah Gilbert Holland (search for this): entry holland-josiah-gilbert
Holland, Josiah Gilbert 1819-1881 Author; born in Belchertown, Mass., July 24, 1819; graduated at the Berkshire Medical College in 1844; engaged in practice in Springfield, Mass., till 1847; then became a teacher in Richmond, Va., and in a few months was called to the superintendency of the public schools in Vicksburg, Miss. A year later he returned to Springfield, and was made associate editor of the Republican, and continued as such till 1866. In 1870 he became editor and part owner ofm, which was even more popular than Titcomb's letters; Life of Abraham Lincoln; Kathrina: her life and mine in a poem; Lessons in life; The story of Sevenoaks; Nicholas Minturn, etc. He died in New York City, Oct. 12, 1881. The following is Dr. Holland's essay on American public education: A venerable gentleman who once occupied a prominent position in a leading New England college, was remarking recently upon the difficulty which he experienced in obtaining servants who would attend to
He made his advent as a book-maker in 1855, by reprinting his History of Western Massachusetts, which had appeared as contributions to the Republican. Later he published The Bay path: a colonial tale; Timothy Titcomb's letters to young people, married and single, which met with much success; Bitter sweet, a poem in dramatic form, which was even more popular than Titcomb's letters; Life of Abraham Lincoln; Kathrina: her life and mine in a poem; Lessons in life; The story of Sevenoaks; Nicholas Minturn, etc. He died in New York City, Oct. 12, 1881. The following is Dr. Holland's essay on American public education: A venerable gentleman who once occupied a prominent position in a leading New England college, was remarking recently upon the difficulty which he experienced in obtaining servants who would attend to their duties. He had just dismissed a girl of sixteen, who was so much above her business as to be intolerable. The girl's father, who was an Englishman, called upon
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