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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 22 total hits in 12 results.

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Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 Naval officer; born in Scituate, R. I., in 1718. Governor Cooke commissioned him a brigadier-general at the breaking out of the Revolution. In December, 1775, Congress commissioned him commander-in-chief of the inchoate navy, and he put to sea in the first squadron in February, 1776, consisting of four ships and three sloops, sailing for the Bahama Islands. There he captured a large quantity of ordnance stores and ammunition, and 100 cannon. He captured two British vessels on his return. Complaint was made that he had not annoyed the British ships on the southern coast, and he was arraigned before the naval Esek Hopkins. committee of Congress on the charge. He was acquitted, but unavoidable delays in getting vessels to sea afterwards caused other charges to be made, and he was dismissed the service, Jan. 2, 1777. During his long life he exerted great political influence in Rhode Island. He died in North Providence, R. I., Feb. 26, 1802.
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry hopkins-esek
Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 Naval officer; born in Scituate, R. I., in 1718. Governor Cooke commissioned him a brigadier-general at the breaking out of the Revolution. In December, 1775, Congress commissioned him commander-in-chief of the inchoate navy, and he put to sea in the first squadron in February, 1776, consisting of four ships and three sloops, sailing for the Bahama Islands. There he captured a large quantity of ordnance stores and ammunition, and 100 cannon. He captured two British vessels on his return. Complaint was made that he had not annoyed the British ships on the southern coast, and he was arraigned before the naval Esek Hopkins. committee of Congress on the charge. He was acquitted, but unavoidable delays in getting vessels to sea afterwards caused other charges to be made, and he was dismissed the service, Jan. 2, 1777. During his long life he exerted great political influence in Rhode Island. He died in North Providence, R. I., Feb. 26, 1802.
Scituate (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry hopkins-esek
Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 Naval officer; born in Scituate, R. I., in 1718. Governor Cooke commissioned him a brigadier-general at the breaking out of the Revolution. In December, 1775, Congress commissioned him commander-in-chief of the inchoate navy, and he put to sea in the first squadron in February, 1776, consisting of four ships and three sloops, sailing for the Bahama Islands. There he captured a large quantity of ordnance stores and ammunition, and 100 cannon. He captured two British vessels on his return. Complaint was made that he had not annoyed the British ships on the southern coast, and he was arraigned before the naval Esek Hopkins. committee of Congress on the charge. He was acquitted, but unavoidable delays in getting vessels to sea afterwards caused other charges to be made, and he was dismissed the service, Jan. 2, 1777. During his long life he exerted great political influence in Rhode Island. He died in North Providence, R. I., Feb. 26, 1802.
North Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry hopkins-esek
Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 Naval officer; born in Scituate, R. I., in 1718. Governor Cooke commissioned him a brigadier-general at the breaking out of the Revolution. In December, 1775, Congress commissioned him commander-in-chief of the inchoate navy, and he put to sea in the first squadron in February, 1776, consisting of four ships and three sloops, sailing for the Bahama Islands. There he captured a large quantity of ordnance stores and ammunition, and 100 cannon. He captured two British vessels on his return. Complaint was made that he had not annoyed the British ships on the southern coast, and he was arraigned before the naval Esek Hopkins. committee of Congress on the charge. He was acquitted, but unavoidable delays in getting vessels to sea afterwards caused other charges to be made, and he was dismissed the service, Jan. 2, 1777. During his long life he exerted great political influence in Rhode Island. He died in North Providence, R. I., Feb. 26, 1802.
Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 Naval officer; born in Scituate, R. I., in 1718. Governor Cooke commissioned him a brigadier-general at the breaking out of the Revolution. In December, 1775, Congress commissioned him commander-in-chief of the inchoate navy, and he put to sea in the first squadron in February, 1776, consisting of four ships and three sloops, sailing for the Bahama Islands. There he captured a large quantity of ordnance stores and ammunition, and 100 cannon. He captured two Britd two British vessels on his return. Complaint was made that he had not annoyed the British ships on the southern coast, and he was arraigned before the naval Esek Hopkins. committee of Congress on the charge. He was acquitted, but unavoidable delays in getting vessels to sea afterwards caused other charges to be made, and he was dismissed the service, Jan. 2, 1777. During his long life he exerted great political influence in Rhode Island. He died in North Providence, R. I., Feb. 26, 1802.
Philip St. George Cooke (search for this): entry hopkins-esek
Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 Naval officer; born in Scituate, R. I., in 1718. Governor Cooke commissioned him a brigadier-general at the breaking out of the Revolution. In December, 1775, Congress commissioned him commander-in-chief of the inchoate navy, and he put to sea in the first squadron in February, 1776, consisting of four ships and three sloops, sailing for the Bahama Islands. There he captured a large quantity of ordnance stores and ammunition, and 100 cannon. He captured two British vessels on his return. Complaint was made that he had not annoyed the British ships on the southern coast, and he was arraigned before the naval Esek Hopkins. committee of Congress on the charge. He was acquitted, but unavoidable delays in getting vessels to sea afterwards caused other charges to be made, and he was dismissed the service, Jan. 2, 1777. During his long life he exerted great political influence in Rhode Island. He died in North Providence, R. I., Feb. 26, 1802.
February, 1776 AD (search for this): entry hopkins-esek
Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 Naval officer; born in Scituate, R. I., in 1718. Governor Cooke commissioned him a brigadier-general at the breaking out of the Revolution. In December, 1775, Congress commissioned him commander-in-chief of the inchoate navy, and he put to sea in the first squadron in February, 1776, consisting of four ships and three sloops, sailing for the Bahama Islands. There he captured a large quantity of ordnance stores and ammunition, and 100 cannon. He captured two British vessels on his return. Complaint was made that he had not annoyed the British ships on the southern coast, and he was arraigned before the naval Esek Hopkins. committee of Congress on the charge. He was acquitted, but unavoidable delays in getting vessels to sea afterwards caused other charges to be made, and he was dismissed the service, Jan. 2, 1777. During his long life he exerted great political influence in Rhode Island. He died in North Providence, R. I., Feb. 26, 1802.
January 2nd, 1777 AD (search for this): entry hopkins-esek
Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 Naval officer; born in Scituate, R. I., in 1718. Governor Cooke commissioned him a brigadier-general at the breaking out of the Revolution. In December, 1775, Congress commissioned him commander-in-chief of the inchoate navy, and he put to sea in the first squadron in February, 1776, consisting of four ships and three sloops, sailing for the Bahama Islands. There he captured a large quantity of ordnance stores and ammunition, and 100 cannon. He captured two British vessels on his return. Complaint was made that he had not annoyed the British ships on the southern coast, and he was arraigned before the naval Esek Hopkins. committee of Congress on the charge. He was acquitted, but unavoidable delays in getting vessels to sea afterwards caused other charges to be made, and he was dismissed the service, Jan. 2, 1777. During his long life he exerted great political influence in Rhode Island. He died in North Providence, R. I., Feb. 26, 1802.
February 26th, 1802 AD (search for this): entry hopkins-esek
Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 Naval officer; born in Scituate, R. I., in 1718. Governor Cooke commissioned him a brigadier-general at the breaking out of the Revolution. In December, 1775, Congress commissioned him commander-in-chief of the inchoate navy, and he put to sea in the first squadron in February, 1776, consisting of four ships and three sloops, sailing for the Bahama Islands. There he captured a large quantity of ordnance stores and ammunition, and 100 cannon. He captured two British vessels on his return. Complaint was made that he had not annoyed the British ships on the southern coast, and he was arraigned before the naval Esek Hopkins. committee of Congress on the charge. He was acquitted, but unavoidable delays in getting vessels to sea afterwards caused other charges to be made, and he was dismissed the service, Jan. 2, 1777. During his long life he exerted great political influence in Rhode Island. He died in North Providence, R. I., Feb. 26, 1802.
Hopkins, Esek 1718-1802 Naval officer; born in Scituate, R. I., in 1718. Governor Cooke commissioned him a brigadier-general at the breaking out of the Revolution. In December, 1775, Congress commissioned him commander-in-chief of the inchoate navy, and he put to sea in the first squadron in February, 1776, consisting of four ships and three sloops, sailing for the Bahama Islands. There he captured a large quantity of ordnance stores and ammunition, and 100 cannon. He captured two British vessels on his return. Complaint was made that he had not annoyed the British ships on the southern coast, and he was arraigned before the naval Esek Hopkins. committee of Congress on the charge. He was acquitted, but unavoidable delays in getting vessels to sea afterwards caused other charges to be made, and he was dismissed the service, Jan. 2, 1777. During his long life he exerted great political influence in Rhode Island. He died in North Providence, R. I., Feb. 26, 1802.
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