hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 11 total hits in 8 results.

Hopper, Isaac Tatem 1771-1852 Philanthropist; born in Gloucester county, N. J., Dec. 3. 1771; accepted the Quaker faith early in life, and later adhered to the doctrines promulgated by Elias Hicks, whose followers became known as Hicksites. As a member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society he often protected the negro people of Philadelphia from the slave kidnappers who infested that city. Later he became widely known through his efforts for the reform of convicts, and lived to see an asylum established by his daughter, Mrs. Abby H. Gibbons, in behalf of these unfortunates, and named in his honor the Isaac T. Hopper home. He died in New York City, May 7, 1852.
December 3rd, 1771 AD (search for this): entry hopper-isaac-tatem
Hopper, Isaac Tatem 1771-1852 Philanthropist; born in Gloucester county, N. J., Dec. 3. 1771; accepted the Quaker faith early in life, and later adhered to the doctrines promulgated by Elias Hicks, whose followers became known as Hicksites. As a member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society he often protected the negro people of Philadelphia from the slave kidnappers who infested that city. Later he became widely known through his efforts for the reform of convicts, and lived to see an asylum established by his daughter, Mrs. Abby H. Gibbons, in behalf of these unfortunates, and named in his honor the Isaac T. Hopper home. He died in New York City, May 7, 1852.
Hopper, Isaac Tatem 1771-1852 Philanthropist; born in Gloucester county, N. J., Dec. 3. 1771; accepted the Quaker faith early in life, and later adhered to the doctrines promulgated by Elias Hicks, whose followers became known as Hicksites. As a member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society he often protected the negro people of Philadelphia from the slave kidnappers who infested that city. Later he became widely known through his efforts for the reform of convicts, and lived to see an asylum established by his daughter, Mrs. Abby H. Gibbons, in behalf of these unfortunates, and named in his honor the Isaac T. Hopper home. He died in New York City, May 7, 1852.
Hopper, Isaac Tatem 1771-1852 Philanthropist; born in Gloucester county, N. J., Dec. 3. 1771; accepted the Quaker faith early in life, and later adhered to the doctrines promulgated by Elias Hicks, whose followers became known as Hicksites. As a member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society he often protected the negro people of Philadelphia from the slave kidnappers who infested that city. Later he became widely known through his efforts for the reform of convicts, and lived to see an asylum established by his daughter, Mrs. Abby H. Gibbons, in behalf of these unfortunates, and named in his honor the Isaac T. Hopper home. He died in New York City, May 7, 1852.
Abby Hopper Gibbons (search for this): entry hopper-isaac-tatem
Hopper, Isaac Tatem 1771-1852 Philanthropist; born in Gloucester county, N. J., Dec. 3. 1771; accepted the Quaker faith early in life, and later adhered to the doctrines promulgated by Elias Hicks, whose followers became known as Hicksites. As a member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society he often protected the negro people of Philadelphia from the slave kidnappers who infested that city. Later he became widely known through his efforts for the reform of convicts, and lived to see an asylum established by his daughter, Mrs. Abby H. Gibbons, in behalf of these unfortunates, and named in his honor the Isaac T. Hopper home. He died in New York City, May 7, 1852.
Hopper, Isaac Tatem 1771-1852 Philanthropist; born in Gloucester county, N. J., Dec. 3. 1771; accepted the Quaker faith early in life, and later adhered to the doctrines promulgated by Elias Hicks, whose followers became known as Hicksites. As a member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society he often protected the negro people of Philadelphia from the slave kidnappers who infested that city. Later he became widely known through his efforts for the reform of convicts, and lived to see an asylum established by his daughter, Mrs. Abby H. Gibbons, in behalf of these unfortunates, and named in his honor the Isaac T. Hopper home. He died in New York City, May 7, 1852.
Hopper, Isaac Tatem 1771-1852 Philanthropist; born in Gloucester county, N. J., Dec. 3. 1771; accepted the Quaker faith early in life, and later adhered to the doctrines promulgated by Elias Hicks, whose followers became known as Hicksites. As a member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society he often protected the negro people of Philadelphia from the slave kidnappers who infested that city. Later he became widely known through his efforts for the reform of convicts, and lived to see an asomulgated by Elias Hicks, whose followers became known as Hicksites. As a member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society he often protected the negro people of Philadelphia from the slave kidnappers who infested that city. Later he became widely known through his efforts for the reform of convicts, and lived to see an asylum established by his daughter, Mrs. Abby H. Gibbons, in behalf of these unfortunates, and named in his honor the Isaac T. Hopper home. He died in New York City, May 7, 1852.
Gloucester County (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry hopper-isaac-tatem
Hopper, Isaac Tatem 1771-1852 Philanthropist; born in Gloucester county, N. J., Dec. 3. 1771; accepted the Quaker faith early in life, and later adhered to the doctrines promulgated by Elias Hicks, whose followers became known as Hicksites. As a member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society he often protected the negro people of Philadelphia from the slave kidnappers who infested that city. Later he became widely known through his efforts for the reform of convicts, and lived to see an asylum established by his daughter, Mrs. Abby H. Gibbons, in behalf of these unfortunates, and named in his honor the Isaac T. Hopper home. He died in New York City, May 7, 1852.