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Hubbardton, battle at. Generals Fraser and Riedesel, with British and German troops, began a pursuit of the Americans as soon as their flight from Ticonderoga was discovered. They overtook their rear-guard, about 1,200 strong, July 7, 1777, at Hubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of New Hampshire, was killed. The Americans were dispersed, and fled, excepting 200 who were made prisoners. The pursuers lost almost as many in killed and wounded, and soon gave up the chase. St. Clair, with about 200 men, made his way through the woods to Fort Edward. The Americans also lost 120 in killed and wounded. The British captured about 200 stand of arms.
Hubbardton, battle at. Generals Fraser and Riedesel, with British and German troops, began a pursuit of the Americans as soon as their flight from Ticonderoga was discovered. They overtook their rear-guard, about 1,200 strong, July 7, 1777, at Hubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of New Hampshire, was killed. The Americans were dispersed, and fled, excepting 200 who were made prisoners. The pursuers lost almost as many in killed and wounded, and soon gave up the chase. St. Clair, with about 200 men, made his way through the woods to Fort Edward. The Americans also lost 120 in killed and wounded. The British captured about 200 stand of arms.
Hubbardton, battle at. Generals Fraser and Riedesel, with British and German troops, began a pursuit of the Americans as soon as their flight from Ticonderoga was discovered. They overtook their rear-guard, about 1,200 strong, July 7, 1777, at Hubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of New Hampshire, was killed. The Americans were dispersed, and fled, excepting 200 who were made prisoners. The pursuers lost almost as many in killed and wounded, and soon gave up the chase. St. Clair, with about 200 men, made his way through the woods to Fort Edward. The Americans also lost 120 in killed and wounded. The British captured about 200 stand of arms.
Hubbardton, battle at. Generals Fraser and Riedesel, with British and German troops, began a pursuit of the Americans as soon as their flight from Ticonderoga was discovered. They overtook their rear-guard, about 1,200 strong, July 7, 1777, at Hubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of New Hampshire, was killed. The Americans were dispersed, and fled, excepting 200 who were made prisoners. The pursuers lost almost as many in killed and wounded, and soon gave up the chase. St. Clair, with about 200 men, made his way through the woods to Fort Edward. The Americans also lost 120 in killed and wounded. The British captured about 200 stand of arms.
St. Clair, Mich. (Michigan, United States) (search for this): entry hubbardton-battle-at
raser and Riedesel, with British and German troops, began a pursuit of the Americans as soon as their flight from Ticonderoga was discovered. They overtook their rear-guard, about 1,200 strong, July 7, 1777, at Hubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of Nhile waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of New Hampshire, was killed. The Americans were dispersed, and fled, excepting 200 who were made prisoners. The pursuers lost almost as many in killed and wounded, and soon gave up the chase. St. Clair, with about 200 men, made his way through the woods to Fort Edward. The Americans also lost 120 in killed and wounded. The British captured about 200 stand of arms.
Castleton (Vermont, United States) (search for this): entry hubbardton-battle-at
Hubbardton, battle at. Generals Fraser and Riedesel, with British and German troops, began a pursuit of the Americans as soon as their flight from Ticonderoga was discovered. They overtook their rear-guard, about 1,200 strong, July 7, 1777, at Hubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of New Hampshire, was killed. The Americans were dispersed, and fled, excepting 200 who were made prisoners. The pursuers lost almost as many in killed and wounded, and soon gave up the chase. St. Clair, with about 200 men, made his way through the woods to Fort Edward. The Americans also lost 120 in killed and wounded. The British captured about 200 stand of arms.
Hubbardton (Vermont, United States) (search for this): entry hubbardton-battle-at
Hubbardton, battle at. Generals Fraser and Riedesel, with British and German troops, began a pursuit of the Americans as soon as their flight from Ticonderoga was discovered. They overtook their rear-guard, about 1,200 strong, July 7, 1777, at Hubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagemHubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of New Hampshire, was killed. The Americans were dispersed, and fled, excepting 200 who were made prisoners. The pursuers lost almost as many in killed and wounded, and soon gave up the chase. St. Clair, with about 200 men, made his way through the woods to Fort Edward. The Americans also lost 120 in killed and wounded. The British captured about 200 stand of arms.
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): entry hubbardton-battle-at
Hubbardton, battle at. Generals Fraser and Riedesel, with British and German troops, began a pursuit of the Americans as soon as their flight from Ticonderoga was discovered. They overtook their rear-guard, about 1,200 strong, July 7, 1777, at Hubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of New Hampshire, was killed. The Americans were dispersed, and fled, excepting 200 who were made prisoners. The pursuers lost almost as many in killed and wounded, and soon gave up the chase. St. Clair, with about 200 men, made his way through the woods to Fort Edward. The Americans also lost 120 in killed and wounded. The British captured about 200 stand of arms.
Fort Edward (New York, United States) (search for this): entry hubbardton-battle-at
Hubbardton, battle at. Generals Fraser and Riedesel, with British and German troops, began a pursuit of the Americans as soon as their flight from Ticonderoga was discovered. They overtook their rear-guard, about 1,200 strong, July 7, 1777, at Hubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of New Hampshire, was killed. The Americans were dispersed, and fled, excepting 200 who were made prisoners. The pursuers lost almost as many in killed and wounded, and soon gave up the chase. St. Clair, with about 200 men, made his way through the woods to Fort Edward. The Americans also lost 120 in killed and wounded. The British captured about 200 stand of arms.
Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): entry hubbardton-battle-at
Hubbardton, battle at. Generals Fraser and Riedesel, with British and German troops, began a pursuit of the Americans as soon as their flight from Ticonderoga was discovered. They overtook their rear-guard, about 1,200 strong, July 7, 1777, at Hubbardton, Vt. The main body of St. Clair's army had marched towards Castleton, leaving the rear-guard, under Col. Seth Warner, to gather up stragglers. While waiting their arrival, Warner was struck by the van of the pursuers, and a sharp engagement took place. Colonel Francis, of New Hampshire, was killed. The Americans were dispersed, and fled, excepting 200 who were made prisoners. The pursuers lost almost as many in killed and wounded, and soon gave up the chase. St. Clair, with about 200 men, made his way through the woods to Fort Edward. The Americans also lost 120 in killed and wounded. The British captured about 200 stand of arms.
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