hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 27 total hits in 20 results.

1 2
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): entry hunkers
Hunkers, The name applied to various political factions in the United States, but in a particular sense to the conservative Democrats of New York State; first used as a designation in 1844. The history of the New York faction, to which the name was afterwards applied, is traceable as far back as 1835. In 1835-40 this faction, which deprecated the introduction of new problems in politics, opposed the war on bank charters by the Loco-Foco (q. v.) faction, although it aided in passing a State banking law in 1838. In 1840-46 they opposed the demand of the radical Democrats for a revision of the State constitution, a cessation of unprofitable canal enterprises, and an elective judiciary, but in this movement were also defeated. In 1846-52 they met with success in their advocacy of the abolition of the State branch of the Democratic party in antagonism to the national organization. After this the Marcy Hunkers, known as softs, supported the Pierce administration, while the Dickinso
United States (United States) (search for this): entry hunkers
Hunkers, The name applied to various political factions in the United States, but in a particular sense to the conservative Democrats of New York State; first used as a designation in 1844. The history of the New York faction, to which the name was afterwards applied, is traceable as far back as 1835. In 1835-40 this faction, which deprecated the introduction of new problems in politics, opposed the war on bank charters by the Loco-Foco (q. v.) faction, although it aided in passing a State banking law in 1838. In 1840-46 they opposed the demand of the radical Democrats for a revision of the State constitution, a cessation of unprofitable canal enterprises, and an elective judiciary, but in this movement were also defeated. In 1846-52 they met with success in their advocacy of the abolition of the State branch of the Democratic party in antagonism to the national organization. After this the Marcy Hunkers, known as softs, supported the Pierce administration, while the Dickins
William C. Bouck (search for this): entry hunkers
on bank charters by the Loco-Foco (q. v.) faction, although it aided in passing a State banking law in 1838. In 1840-46 they opposed the demand of the radical Democrats for a revision of the State constitution, a cessation of unprofitable canal enterprises, and an elective judiciary, but in this movement were also defeated. In 1846-52 they met with success in their advocacy of the abolition of the State branch of the Democratic party in antagonism to the national organization. After this the Marcy Hunkers, known as softs, supported the Pierce administration, while the Dickinson Hunkers, known as hards, opposed it. The latter during the Civil War were generally war Democrats. The principal Hunker leaders were: Daniel S. Dickinson, Edwin Closwell, William C. Bouck, William L. Marcy, Horatio Seymour, and Samuel Beardsley; and their leading opponents were Martin Van Buren, Silas Wright, A. C. Flagg, John A. Dix, Reuben E. Fenton, Samuel Young, and Michael Hoffman. See Albany regency.
Michael Hoffman (search for this): entry hunkers
on bank charters by the Loco-Foco (q. v.) faction, although it aided in passing a State banking law in 1838. In 1840-46 they opposed the demand of the radical Democrats for a revision of the State constitution, a cessation of unprofitable canal enterprises, and an elective judiciary, but in this movement were also defeated. In 1846-52 they met with success in their advocacy of the abolition of the State branch of the Democratic party in antagonism to the national organization. After this the Marcy Hunkers, known as softs, supported the Pierce administration, while the Dickinson Hunkers, known as hards, opposed it. The latter during the Civil War were generally war Democrats. The principal Hunker leaders were: Daniel S. Dickinson, Edwin Closwell, William C. Bouck, William L. Marcy, Horatio Seymour, and Samuel Beardsley; and their leading opponents were Martin Van Buren, Silas Wright, A. C. Flagg, John A. Dix, Reuben E. Fenton, Samuel Young, and Michael Hoffman. See Albany regency.
Martin Buren (search for this): entry hunkers
on bank charters by the Loco-Foco (q. v.) faction, although it aided in passing a State banking law in 1838. In 1840-46 they opposed the demand of the radical Democrats for a revision of the State constitution, a cessation of unprofitable canal enterprises, and an elective judiciary, but in this movement were also defeated. In 1846-52 they met with success in their advocacy of the abolition of the State branch of the Democratic party in antagonism to the national organization. After this the Marcy Hunkers, known as softs, supported the Pierce administration, while the Dickinson Hunkers, known as hards, opposed it. The latter during the Civil War were generally war Democrats. The principal Hunker leaders were: Daniel S. Dickinson, Edwin Closwell, William C. Bouck, William L. Marcy, Horatio Seymour, and Samuel Beardsley; and their leading opponents were Martin Van Buren, Silas Wright, A. C. Flagg, John A. Dix, Reuben E. Fenton, Samuel Young, and Michael Hoffman. See Albany regency.
Samuel Beardsley (search for this): entry hunkers
on bank charters by the Loco-Foco (q. v.) faction, although it aided in passing a State banking law in 1838. In 1840-46 they opposed the demand of the radical Democrats for a revision of the State constitution, a cessation of unprofitable canal enterprises, and an elective judiciary, but in this movement were also defeated. In 1846-52 they met with success in their advocacy of the abolition of the State branch of the Democratic party in antagonism to the national organization. After this the Marcy Hunkers, known as softs, supported the Pierce administration, while the Dickinson Hunkers, known as hards, opposed it. The latter during the Civil War were generally war Democrats. The principal Hunker leaders were: Daniel S. Dickinson, Edwin Closwell, William C. Bouck, William L. Marcy, Horatio Seymour, and Samuel Beardsley; and their leading opponents were Martin Van Buren, Silas Wright, A. C. Flagg, John A. Dix, Reuben E. Fenton, Samuel Young, and Michael Hoffman. See Albany regency.
John Adams Dix (search for this): entry hunkers
on bank charters by the Loco-Foco (q. v.) faction, although it aided in passing a State banking law in 1838. In 1840-46 they opposed the demand of the radical Democrats for a revision of the State constitution, a cessation of unprofitable canal enterprises, and an elective judiciary, but in this movement were also defeated. In 1846-52 they met with success in their advocacy of the abolition of the State branch of the Democratic party in antagonism to the national organization. After this the Marcy Hunkers, known as softs, supported the Pierce administration, while the Dickinson Hunkers, known as hards, opposed it. The latter during the Civil War were generally war Democrats. The principal Hunker leaders were: Daniel S. Dickinson, Edwin Closwell, William C. Bouck, William L. Marcy, Horatio Seymour, and Samuel Beardsley; and their leading opponents were Martin Van Buren, Silas Wright, A. C. Flagg, John A. Dix, Reuben E. Fenton, Samuel Young, and Michael Hoffman. See Albany regency.
William L. Marcy (search for this): entry hunkers
on bank charters by the Loco-Foco (q. v.) faction, although it aided in passing a State banking law in 1838. In 1840-46 they opposed the demand of the radical Democrats for a revision of the State constitution, a cessation of unprofitable canal enterprises, and an elective judiciary, but in this movement were also defeated. In 1846-52 they met with success in their advocacy of the abolition of the State branch of the Democratic party in antagonism to the national organization. After this the Marcy Hunkers, known as softs, supported the Pierce administration, while the Dickinson Hunkers, known as hards, opposed it. The latter during the Civil War were generally war Democrats. The principal Hunker leaders were: Daniel S. Dickinson, Edwin Closwell, William C. Bouck, William L. Marcy, Horatio Seymour, and Samuel Beardsley; and their leading opponents were Martin Van Buren, Silas Wright, A. C. Flagg, John A. Dix, Reuben E. Fenton, Samuel Young, and Michael Hoffman. See Albany regency.
Silas Wright (search for this): entry hunkers
on bank charters by the Loco-Foco (q. v.) faction, although it aided in passing a State banking law in 1838. In 1840-46 they opposed the demand of the radical Democrats for a revision of the State constitution, a cessation of unprofitable canal enterprises, and an elective judiciary, but in this movement were also defeated. In 1846-52 they met with success in their advocacy of the abolition of the State branch of the Democratic party in antagonism to the national organization. After this the Marcy Hunkers, known as softs, supported the Pierce administration, while the Dickinson Hunkers, known as hards, opposed it. The latter during the Civil War were generally war Democrats. The principal Hunker leaders were: Daniel S. Dickinson, Edwin Closwell, William C. Bouck, William L. Marcy, Horatio Seymour, and Samuel Beardsley; and their leading opponents were Martin Van Buren, Silas Wright, A. C. Flagg, John A. Dix, Reuben E. Fenton, Samuel Young, and Michael Hoffman. See Albany regency.
Horatio Seymour (search for this): entry hunkers
on bank charters by the Loco-Foco (q. v.) faction, although it aided in passing a State banking law in 1838. In 1840-46 they opposed the demand of the radical Democrats for a revision of the State constitution, a cessation of unprofitable canal enterprises, and an elective judiciary, but in this movement were also defeated. In 1846-52 they met with success in their advocacy of the abolition of the State branch of the Democratic party in antagonism to the national organization. After this the Marcy Hunkers, known as softs, supported the Pierce administration, while the Dickinson Hunkers, known as hards, opposed it. The latter during the Civil War were generally war Democrats. The principal Hunker leaders were: Daniel S. Dickinson, Edwin Closwell, William C. Bouck, William L. Marcy, Horatio Seymour, and Samuel Beardsley; and their leading opponents were Martin Van Buren, Silas Wright, A. C. Flagg, John A. Dix, Reuben E. Fenton, Samuel Young, and Michael Hoffman. See Albany regency.
1 2