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ber of ships-of-war in Boston Harbor; all of which they charged to misrepresentations at court by Governor Bernard, as well as the incumbent. They appointed Dr. Franklin as agent of the province in England. And then began that series of contests between Hutchinson and the people which speedily caused his exile from his native overnor Hutchinson and others of the crown officers in Massachusetts to Mr. Whately, one of the under-secretaries of the government, were put into the hands of Dr. Franklin, agent for Massachusetts, by Dr. Hugh Williamson, of Philadelphia. In these letters the popular leaders were vilified, the liberal clauses of the colonial cha upon their commercial privileges was recommended, and an abridgment of what are called English privileges in America, by coercive measures, was strongly urged. Franklin saw in these letters evidences of a conspiracy against his country by enemies in its bosom, and he sent them to Thomas Cushing, speaker of the Massachusetts Asse
ion; that it had occasioned extreme alarm; that no colony would comply with their request for a general suspension of commerce; and that Rhode Island had accompanied its refusal with a sneer at the selfishness of the Bostonians. The King had heard and believed that the Boston clergy preached toleration for all kinds of immoralities for the sake of liberty, and scores of other tales, which Hutchinson did not deny; and for two hours the conversation went on, until the King was satisfied that Boston would be unsupported in its rebellious attitude by the other colonies. The author of this intelligence, says Bancroft, became at once a favorite, was offered the rank of a baronet, and was consulted as an oracle by Gibbon, the historian, and other politicians at court. Boston tea party. In his history of Massachusetts Bay, Governor Hutchinson gives the following account of the destruction of tea in Boston Harbor: The Assembly being prorogued, there was again room to hope for a fe
er application. But he was relieved from his suspense, the same evening, by intelligence from town of the total destruction of the tea. It was not expected that the governor would comply with the demand; and, before it was possible for the owner of the ship to return from the country with an answer, about fifty men had prepared themselves, and passed by the house where the people were assembled to the wharf where the vessels lay, being covered with blankets, and making the appearance of Indians. The body of the people remained until they had received the governor's answer; and then, after it had been observed to them that, everything else in their power having been done, it now remained to proceed in the only way left, and that, the owner of the ship having behaved like a man of honor, no injury ought to be offered to his person or property, the meeting was declared to be dissolved, and the body of the people repaired to the wharf, and surrounded the immediate actors, as a guard
58 to 1771; and was made chief-justice Thomas Hutchinson of the province in 1768. At that time hhen, in 1769, Governor Bernard was recalled, Hutchinson became acting-governor of Massachusetts, andon of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Hutchinson died in Brompton, near London, June 3, 1780. Hutchinson took a seat in Governor Bernard's council, January, 1767, where he had no right. Thed then began that series of contests between Hutchinson and the people which speedily caused his exiindignation which they raised was fearful to Hutchinson and his friends. When a committee waited upemoval. The writers of the letters were Thomas Hutchinson, Andrew Oliver (lieutenant-governor), Chof liberty, and scores of other tales, which Hutchinson did not deny; and for two hours the conversa In his history of Massachusetts Bay, Governor Hutchinson gives the following account of the dest printed, declaring that the conduct of Governor Hutchinson, in requiring the justices of peace in [3 more...]
stify. He therefore advised to their anchoring without the castle, and their waiting for orders; and this advice was approved of by the consignees, and by the owner of the ship first expected, if not by the owners of the other ships; and orders were given to the pilots accordingly. All design of riots and acts of violence had been disclaimed by the conductors of measures for preventing the tea from being landed. A great number of rioters assembled, notwithstanding, before the house of Mr. Clarke, one of the consignees, in the evening, and attempted to force their way in, broke the windows to pieces, and otherwise damaged it, so as to cause the occupiers to remove out of it. One of the consignees fired with ball upon the mob, from one of the windows, soon after which the rioters dispersed. The next day a town-meeting was held in Boston, for the sole purpose of inquiring of the consignees whether they were prepared to give a definite answer to the request of the town. They infor
usetts Assembly. They were finally published, and created intense excitement throughout the colonies. The tempest of indignation which they raised was fearful to Hutchinson and his friends. When a committee waited upon him for an explicit answer as to the authenticity of his own letters, he replied, They are mine, but were quite confidential. This was not satisfactory, and the Assembly adopted a petition to the King for his removal. The writers of the letters were Thomas Hutchinson, Andrew Oliver (lieutenant-governor), Charles Paxton, Thomas Moffatt, Robert Auchmuty, Nathaniel Rogers, and George Rome. See Franklin, Benjamin. So eager was the King to see Governor Hutchinson, of Massachusetts, on his arrival in England in July, 1774, that he was hurried by Lord Dartmouth to the presence of his Majesty without time to change his clothes. He gave the King much comfort. He assured him that the Port Bill was a wise and effective method for bringing the Boston people into submissi
tempest of indignation which they raised was fearful to Hutchinson and his friends. When a committee waited upon him for an explicit answer as to the authenticity of his own letters, he replied, They are mine, but were quite confidential. This was not satisfactory, and the Assembly adopted a petition to the King for his removal. The writers of the letters were Thomas Hutchinson, Andrew Oliver (lieutenant-governor), Charles Paxton, Thomas Moffatt, Robert Auchmuty, Nathaniel Rogers, and George Rome. See Franklin, Benjamin. So eager was the King to see Governor Hutchinson, of Massachusetts, on his arrival in England in July, 1774, that he was hurried by Lord Dartmouth to the presence of his Majesty without time to change his clothes. He gave the King much comfort. He assured him that the Port Bill was a wise and effective method for bringing the Boston people into submission; that it had occasioned extreme alarm; that no colony would comply with their request for a general susp
naturally sided with the crown in the rising disputes, and became very obnoxious to the republicans. When, in 1769, Governor Bernard was recalled, Hutchinson became acting-governor of Massachusetts, and was commissioned governor in 1771. He was consachusetts Historical Society. Hutchinson died in Brompton, near London, June 3, 1780. Hutchinson took a seat in Governor Bernard's council, January, 1767, where he had no right. The Massachusetts Assembly resented this usurpation, this lust of ous vote, denied the pretensions of the intruder, for the language of the charter was too clear to admit of a doubt; yet Bernard urged the interposition of the British government to keep him there. This conduct of the crown officers greatly irritatf the unusual number of ships-of-war in Boston Harbor; all of which they charged to misrepresentations at court by Governor Bernard, as well as the incumbent. They appointed Dr. Franklin as agent of the province in England. And then began that se
Mary Wortley Montagu (search for this): entry hutchinson-thomas
r a pass by the castle. He made an apology to the governor for coming upon such an errand, having been compelled to it; and received an answer that no pass ever had been, or lawfully could be, given to any vessel which had not first been cleared at the custom-house, and that, upon his producing a clearance, such pass would immediately be given by the naval officer. The governor inquired of him whether he did not apprehend his ship in danger from the people, and offered him a letter to Admiral Montagu, desiring him to afford all necessary protection. He said he had been advised to remove his vessel under the stern of the admiral's ship, but, among other reasons for not doing it, mentioned his fears of the rage of the people; that his concern was not for his ship, which he did not believe was in danger, but he could not tell what would be the fate of the tea on board. He declined taking any letter to the admiral, and returned to the people. The governor was unable to judge what wou
t the colonies. The tempest of indignation which they raised was fearful to Hutchinson and his friends. When a committee waited upon him for an explicit answer as to the authenticity of his own letters, he replied, They are mine, but were quite confidential. This was not satisfactory, and the Assembly adopted a petition to the King for his removal. The writers of the letters were Thomas Hutchinson, Andrew Oliver (lieutenant-governor), Charles Paxton, Thomas Moffatt, Robert Auchmuty, Nathaniel Rogers, and George Rome. See Franklin, Benjamin. So eager was the King to see Governor Hutchinson, of Massachusetts, on his arrival in England in July, 1774, that he was hurried by Lord Dartmouth to the presence of his Majesty without time to change his clothes. He gave the King much comfort. He assured him that the Port Bill was a wise and effective method for bringing the Boston people into submission; that it had occasioned extreme alarm; that no colony would comply with their request
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