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Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry kilpatrick-hugh-judson
atrick, Hugh Judson Military officer; born near Deckertown, N. J., Jan. 14, 1836; graduated at West Point in 1861; and first entered the artillery. He was wounded in the battle of Big Bethel (June, 1861), and in September was made lieutenant-colonel of cavalry. His efficient services on all occasions won for him the rank of brigadier-general and major-general of volunteers, and the command of a division of cavalry in the Army of the Potomac. He was very active in the campaign against Atlanta in 1864, in Sherman's march to Hugh Judson Kilpatrick. the sea, and in his march through the Carolinas to the surrender of Johnston. For the latter campaign he was brevetted major-general U. S. A. In 1865-68 he was United States minister to Chile; in 1881 he was reappointed; and held the post till his death in Valparaiso, Dec. 4, 1881. On Sunday morning, Feb. 28, 1864, Kilpatrick, with 5,000 cavalry, picked from his own and the divisions of Merritt and Gregg, crossed the Rapidan, swep
Belle Isle, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry kilpatrick-hugh-judson
d thrown down their arms and fled into the city. At Spottsylvania Court-house about 500 of his best men, led by Col. Ulric Dahlgren, a dashing young officer, diverged from the main column for the purpose of striking the James River Canal above Richmond, destroying as much of it as possible, and, crossing the James River, attacked the Confederate capital on the south simultaneously with the attack of Kilpatrick on the north. The object of this move was to liberate the Union prisoners at Belle Isle, on the James River, in front of Richmond. Kilpatrick, disappointed in not hearing Dahlgren's guns, and hard pressed by the Confederates as he attempted to penetrate the second line of defences, withdrew after a sharp fight, and halted 6 miles from Richmond. He was pursued by the Confederates, with whom he skirmished, and returned to his place of departure. Meanwhile Dahlgren, misled by a negro guide, failed to cross the James River, but struck the outer line of fortifications on the no
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry kilpatrick-hugh-judson
officer, diverged from the main column for the purpose of striking the James River Canal above Richmond, destroying as much of it as possible, and, crossing the James River, attacked the Confederate capital on the south simultaneously with the attack of Kilpatrick on the north. The object of this move was to liberate the Union prisoners at Belle Isle, on the James River, in front of Richmond. Kilpatrick, disappointed in not hearing Dahlgren's guns, and hard pressed by the Confederates as he attempted to penetrate the second line of defences, withdrew after a sharp fight, and halted 6 miles from Richmond. He was pursued by the Confederates, with whom he skirmished, and returned to his place of departure. Meanwhile Dahlgren, misled by a negro guide, failed to cross the James River, but struck the outer line of fortifications on the northern side of Richmond at dark, March 2. In a conflict that ensued the Nationals were repulsed, and they retreated towards Chickahominy, hotly pursue
el of cavalry. His efficient services on all occasions won for him the rank of brigadier-general and major-general of volunteers, and the command of a division of cavalry in the Army of the Potomac. He was very active in the campaign against Atlanta in 1864, in Sherman's march to Hugh Judson Kilpatrick. the sea, and in his march through the Carolinas to the surrender of Johnston. For the latter campaign he was brevetted major-general U. S. A. In 1865-68 he was United States minister to Chile; in 1881 he was reappointed; and held the post till his death in Valparaiso, Dec. 4, 1881. On Sunday morning, Feb. 28, 1864, Kilpatrick, with 5,000 cavalry, picked from his own and the divisions of Merritt and Gregg, crossed the Rapidan, swept around to the right flank of Lee's army by way of Spottsylvania Court-house, and, pushing rapidly towards Richmond, struck the Virginia Central Railroad at Beaver Dam station, where he had his first serious encounter with the Confederates, under the
Chickahominy (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry kilpatrick-hugh-judson
Confederates as he attempted to penetrate the second line of defences, withdrew after a sharp fight, and halted 6 miles from Richmond. He was pursued by the Confederates, with whom he skirmished, and returned to his place of departure. Meanwhile Dahlgren, misled by a negro guide, failed to cross the James River, but struck the outer line of fortifications on the northern side of Richmond at dark, March 2. In a conflict that ensued the Nationals were repulsed, and they retreated towards Chickahominy, hotly pursued. Dahlgren and about 100 of his men became separated from the rest. On the evening of the 3d the young leader, in a conflict some distance from Richmond, was shot dead, and his men were made prisoners. General Sherman, when he heard of Wheeler's raid, sent Kilpatrick, with 5.000 cavalry, during the night of Aug. 18, 1864, to strike the railway at West Point, Ga., and break it to Fairborn, and then to tear up the Macon road thoroughly. When he reached the Macon road, ne
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry kilpatrick-hugh-judson
his men were made prisoners. General Sherman, when he heard of Wheeler's raid, sent Kilpatrick, with 5.000 cavalry, during the night of Aug. 18, 1864, to strike the railway at West Point, Ga., and break it to Fairborn, and then to tear up the Macon road thoroughly. When he reached the Macon road, near Jonesboro, he was confronted by Ross's Confederate cavalry. These he routed, and drove through Jonesboro, and just as he began tearing up the road some cavalry came up from the south, and coe reached the Macon road, near Jonesboro, he was confronted by Ross's Confederate cavalry. These he routed, and drove through Jonesboro, and just as he began tearing up the road some cavalry came up from the south, and compelled him to desist and fly. He swept around, and again struck the road at Lovejoy's, where he was attacked by a larger force. Through these he dashed, capturing and destroying a four-gun battery, and sweeping around, reached headquarters on the 22d, with seventy prisoners.
West Point (New York, United States) (search for this): entry kilpatrick-hugh-judson
Kilpatrick, Hugh Judson Military officer; born near Deckertown, N. J., Jan. 14, 1836; graduated at West Point in 1861; and first entered the artillery. He was wounded in the battle of Big Bethel (June, 1861), and in September was made lieutenant-colonel of cavalry. His efficient services on all occasions won for him the rank of brigadier-general and major-general of volunteers, and the command of a division of cavalry in the Army of the Potomac. He was very active in the campaign against Atlanta in 1864, in Sherman's march to Hugh Judson Kilpatrick. the sea, and in his march through the Carolinas to the surrender of Johnston. For the latter campaign he was brevetted major-general U. S. A. In 1865-68 he was United States minister to Chile; in 1881 he was reappointed; and held the post till his death in Valparaiso, Dec. 4, 1881. On Sunday morning, Feb. 28, 1864, Kilpatrick, with 5,000 cavalry, picked from his own and the divisions of Merritt and Gregg, crossed the Rapidan,
United States (United States) (search for this): entry kilpatrick-hugh-judson
c. He was very active in the campaign against Atlanta in 1864, in Sherman's march to Hugh Judson Kilpatrick. the sea, and in his march through the Carolinas to the surrender of Johnston. For the latter campaign he was brevetted major-general U. S. A. In 1865-68 he was United States minister to Chile; in 1881 he was reappointed; and held the post till his death in Valparaiso, Dec. 4, 1881. On Sunday morning, Feb. 28, 1864, Kilpatrick, with 5,000 cavalry, picked from his own and the divisioUnited States minister to Chile; in 1881 he was reappointed; and held the post till his death in Valparaiso, Dec. 4, 1881. On Sunday morning, Feb. 28, 1864, Kilpatrick, with 5,000 cavalry, picked from his own and the divisions of Merritt and Gregg, crossed the Rapidan, swept around to the right flank of Lee's army by way of Spottsylvania Court-house, and, pushing rapidly towards Richmond, struck the Virginia Central Railroad at Beaver Dam station, where he had his first serious encounter with the Confederates, under the Maryland leader, Bradley T. Johnson, whom he defeated. Then he struck across the South Anna, cut the Fredericksburg and Richmond Railway, and on March 1 halted within 3 miles of Richmond. His gra
Beaver Dam Station (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry kilpatrick-hugh-judson
was brevetted major-general U. S. A. In 1865-68 he was United States minister to Chile; in 1881 he was reappointed; and held the post till his death in Valparaiso, Dec. 4, 1881. On Sunday morning, Feb. 28, 1864, Kilpatrick, with 5,000 cavalry, picked from his own and the divisions of Merritt and Gregg, crossed the Rapidan, swept around to the right flank of Lee's army by way of Spottsylvania Court-house, and, pushing rapidly towards Richmond, struck the Virginia Central Railroad at Beaver Dam station, where he had his first serious encounter with the Confederates, under the Maryland leader, Bradley T. Johnson, whom he defeated. Then he struck across the South Anna, cut the Fredericksburg and Richmond Railway, and on March 1 halted within 3 miles of Richmond. His grand object was to liberate the Union captives from Libby prison (see Confederate prisons). He was now within the outer line of its defences, at which the Confederates had thrown down their arms and fled into the city.
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry kilpatrick-hugh-judson
Richmond at dark, March 2. In a conflict that ensued the Nationals were repulsed, and they retreated towards Chickahominy, hotly pursued. Dahlgren and about 100 of his men became separated from the rest. On the evening of the 3d the young leader, in a conflict some distance from Richmond, was shot dead, and his men were made prisoners. General Sherman, when he heard of Wheeler's raid, sent Kilpatrick, with 5.000 cavalry, during the night of Aug. 18, 1864, to strike the railway at West Point, Ga., and break it to Fairborn, and then to tear up the Macon road thoroughly. When he reached the Macon road, near Jonesboro, he was confronted by Ross's Confederate cavalry. These he routed, and drove through Jonesboro, and just as he began tearing up the road some cavalry came up from the south, and compelled him to desist and fly. He swept around, and again struck the road at Lovejoy's, where he was attacked by a larger force. Through these he dashed, capturing and destroying a four-g
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