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La Salle, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry la-salle-robert-cavelter-sieur-de
Mississippi northward. With five companions, La Salle started back for Canada, and from the mouth oing as well as he could with his creditors, La Salle, with a fresh party of twenty-three Frenchmen abandon the fort and return to Green Bay. La Salle and his party went down the Illinois to its mn Mas, Jean Duglignon, Nicholas de la Salle. La Salle formally proclaimed the whole valley of the Mhich flourished in the eighteenth century. La Salle ascended the Mississippi the next year, and rn Beaujeu, the navigator of the squadron, and La Salle proved disastrous to the expedition. Touchin mouth of the Mississippi without knowing it. La Salle became satisfied of this fact, but Beaujeu saujeu, pleading a lack of provisions, deserted La Salle, leaving him only a small vessel. He cast upg half of them, including women and children, La Salle set out, at the beginning of 1688, to make hiolt broke out, and the two ringleaders killed La Salle's nephew in a stealthy manner; and when the g[3 more...]
La Salle, Robert Cavelter, Sieur de 1643- Explorer; born in Rouen, France, Nov. 22. 1643: in early life became a Jesuit, and thereby forfeited his patrimony. He afterwards left the order, and went to Canada as an adventurer in 1666. From the Sulpicians, seigneurs of Montreal, he obtained a grant of land and founded Lachine. Tales of the wonders and riches of the wilderness inspired him with a desire to explore. With two Sulpicians, he went into the wilds of western New York, and afterwards went down the Ohio River as far as the site of Louisville. Governor Frontenac became his friend, and in the autumn of 1674 he went to France bearing a letter from the governorgeneral, strongly recommending him to Colbert, the French premier. Honors and privileges were bestowed upon him at the French Court, and he was made governor of Fort Frontenac, erected on the site of Kingston, at the foot of Lake Ontario, which he greatly strengthened, and gathered Indian settlers around it. He had
eral, strongly recommending him to Colbert, the French premier. Honors and privileges were bestowed upon him at the French Court, and he was made governor of Fort Frontenac, erected on the site of Kingston, at the foot of Lake Ontario, which he greatly strengthened, and gathered Indian settlers around it. He had very soon a squadron of four vessels on the lake, engaged in the fur-trade, and Fort Frontenac was made the centre of that traffic, in which he now largely engaged and sought the monopoly. Conceiving a grand scheme of explorations and trade westward, perhaps to China, he went to France in 1678 and obtained permission to execute it. He was allowedMontreal. Henri de Tonti, a veteran Italian, joined him, and, with thirty mechanics and mariners, they sailed from Rochelle in the summer of 1678, and reached Fort Frontenac early in the autumn. De Tonti was sent farther west to establish a trading-post at the mouth of the Niagara River. He proceeded, also, to build a vessel abo
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): entry la-salle-robert-cavelter-sieur-de
eded to France and proposed to the government a settlement in Louisiana and the conquest of the rich mining country in northern Mexico. A patent was granted him, and he was made commandant of the vast territory from the present State of Illinois to Mexico, and westward indefinitely. With 280 indifferent persons he sailed from France Aug. 1, 1684, with four ships; but disputes between Beaujeu, the navigator of the squadron, and La Salle proved disastrous to the expedition. Touching at Santo Domingo, they entered the Gulf of Mexico, and, by miscalculations, passed the mouth of the Mississippi without knowing it. La Salle became satisfied of this fact, but Beaujeu sailed obstinately on, and finally anchored off the entrance to Matagorda Bay. The colonists debarked, but the store-ship containing most of the supplies, was wrecked. Beaujeu, pleading a lack of provisions, deserted La Salle, leaving him only a small vessel. He cast up a fort, which he called St. Louis, and attempted to
La Salle started back for Canada, and from the mouth of the St. Joseph he crossed Michigan to a river flowing into the Detroit, and thence overland to Lake Erie. From its western end he navigated it in a canoe to Niagara, where he was satisfied that the Griffin had perished somewhere on the lakes. He also heard of the loss of a ship arriving from France with supplies. Settling as well as he could with his creditors, La Salle, with a fresh party of twenty-three Frenchmen and eighteen New England Inddians, with ten women and children, began a return journey to Fort Crevecoeur, with supplies. De Tonti had been driven away by an attack on the Illinois settlement of the Iroquois. The desertion of his men had compelled him to abandon the fort and return to Green Bay. La Salle and his party went down the Illinois to its mouth, when he returned to gather his followers and procure means for continuing his explorations. Late in December, 1681, he started from Fort Miami with his exp
Peoria (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry la-salle-robert-cavelter-sieur-de
ssing him with claims, and he unlawfully gathered furs and sent them back in the Griffin to meet those claims. Then he proceeded, with his party, in canoes, to the mouth of the St. Joseph River, in southwestern Michigan, where he established a trading-house and called it Fort Miami. Ascending the St. Joseph, he crossed to the Kankakee, and paddled down it until he reached an Illinois village, and, in January, 1680, he began the establishment of a trading-post on the site of the present Peoria, Ill., which he called Fort Robert Cavelier Sieur De La Salle. Crevecoeur. Disappointed in the failure of the Griffin to make a return voyage with supplies, he put De Tonti in command of the fort and despatched Hennepin and Acau to explore the Illinois to its mouth and the Mississippi northward. With five companions, La Salle started back for Canada, and from the mouth of the St. Joseph he crossed Michigan to a river flowing into the Detroit, and thence overland to Lake Erie. From its west
, Jacques Cauclois, Pierre You, Giles Mencret, Jean Michel (surgeon), Jean Mas, Jean Duglignon, Nicholas de la Salle. La Salle formally proclaimed the whole valley of the Mississippi and the region of its tributaries a part of the French dominions, and named the country Louisiana, in compliment to the King. So was first planted the germ of the empire of the French in that region, which flourished in the eighteenth century. La Salle ascended the Mississippi the next year, and returned to Quebec in November, leaving Tonti in command in the west, with directions to meet him at the mouth of the Mississippi the following year. Then he proceeded to France and proposed to the government a settlement in Louisiana and the conquest of the rich mining country in northern Mexico. A patent was granted him, and he was made commandant of the vast territory from the present State of Illinois to Mexico, and westward indefinitely. With 280 indifferent persons he sailed from France Aug. 1, 1684,
r Frontenac became his friend, and in the autumn of 1674 he went to France bearing a letter from the governorgeneral, strongly recommending hime of explorations and trade westward, perhaps to China, he went to France in 1678 and obtained permission to execute it. He was allowed to enre on the lakes. He also heard of the loss of a ship arriving from France with supplies. Settling as well as he could with his creditors, e prepared a cross and a column, affixing to the latter the arms of France and this inscription, Louis the Great, King of France and Navarre, France and Navarre, April 9, 1682. He also buried there a leaden plate, with a Latin inscription. The whole company then signed a proces verbal, in the followin mouth of the Mississippi the following year. Then he proceeded to France and proposed to the government a settlement in Louisiana and the cwestward indefinitely. With 280 indifferent persons he sailed from France Aug. 1, 1684, with four ships; but disputes between Beaujeu, the na
o explore. With two Sulpicians, he went into the wilds of western New York, and afterwards went down the Ohio River as far as the site of Louisville. Governor Frontenac became his friend, and in the autumn of 1674 he went to France bearing a letter from the governorgeneral, strongly recommending him to Colbert, the French premier. Honors and privileges were bestowed upon him at the French Court, and he was made governor of Fort Frontenac, erected on the site of Kingston, at the foot of Lake Ontario, which he greatly strengthened, and gathered Indian settlers around it. He had very soon a squadron of four vessels on the lake, engaged in the fur-trade, and Fort Frontenac was made the centre of that traffic, in which he now largely engaged and sought the monopoly. Conceiving a grand scheme of explorations and trade westward, perhaps to China, he went to France in 1678 and obtained permission to execute it. He was allowed to engage in explorations, build forts, and have the monopoly of
nti in command in the west, with directions to meet him at the mouth of the Mississippi the following year. Then he proceeded to France and proposed to the government a settlement in Louisiana and the conquest of the rich mining country in northern Mexico. A patent was granted him, and he was made commandant of the vast territory from the present State of Illinois to Mexico, and westward indefinitely. With 280 indifferent persons he sailed from France Aug. 1, 1684, with four ships; but dispMexico, and westward indefinitely. With 280 indifferent persons he sailed from France Aug. 1, 1684, with four ships; but disputes between Beaujeu, the navigator of the squadron, and La Salle proved disastrous to the expedition. Touching at Santo Domingo, they entered the Gulf of Mexico, and, by miscalculations, passed the mouth of the Mississippi without knowing it. La Salle became satisfied of this fact, but Beaujeu sailed obstinately on, and finally anchored off the entrance to Matagorda Bay. The colonists debarked, but the store-ship containing most of the supplies, was wrecked. Beaujeu, pleading a lack of provi
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