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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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ssfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1775, and was one of the committee appointed to draft a declaration of independence, but his necessary absence from Congress prevented his signing it. On the organization of the State of New York under a constitution, he was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in per- Robert R. Livingston. fecting the system of steam navigation. He died in Clermont, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1813. See steamboat, invention of.
King's college (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry livingston-robert-r
Livingston, Robert R. 1747-1813 Statesman; born in New York City, Nov. 27, 1747; graduated at King's College in 1765; practised law successfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1775, and was one of the committee appointed to draft a declaration of independence, but his necessary absence from Congress prevented his signing it. On the organization of the State of New York under a constitution, he was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in
Clermont, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry livingston-robert-r
sfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1775, and was one of the committee appointed to draft a declaration of independence, but his necessary absence from Congress prevented his signing it. On the organization of the State of New York under a constitution, he was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in per- Robert R. Livingston. fecting the system of steam navigation. He died in Clermont, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1813. See steamboat, invention of.
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): entry livingston-robert-r
Statesman; born in New York City, Nov. 27, 1747; graduated at King's College in 1765; practised law successfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1775, and was one of the committee appointed to draft a declaration of independence, but his necessary absence from Congress prevented his signing it. On the organization of the State of New York under a constitution, he was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in per- Robert R. Livingston. fec
United States (United States) (search for this): entry livingston-robert-r
sfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1775, and was one of the committee appointed to draft a declaration of independence, but his necessary absence from Congress prevented his signing it. On the organization of the State of New York under a constitution, he was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in per- Robert R. Livingston. fecting the system of steam navigation. He died in Clermont, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1813. See steamboat, invention of.
Robert R. Livingston (search for this): entry livingston-robert-r
Livingston, Robert R. 1747-1813 Statesman; born in New York City, Nov. 27, 1747; graduated at King's College in 1765; practised law successfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, hConstitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in per- Robert R. Livingston. fecting the system of steam navigation. He died in Clermont, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1813. See steamboat, invention of.
ssfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1775, and was one of the committee appointed to draft a declaration of independence, but his necessary absence from Congress prevented his signing it. On the organization of the State of New York under a constitution, he was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in per- Robert R. Livingston. fecting the system of steam navigation. He died in Clermont, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1813. See steamboat, invention of.
Livingston, Robert R. 1747-1813 Statesman; born in New York City, Nov. 27, 1747; graduated at King's College in 1765; practised law successfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1775, and was one of the committee appointed to draft a declaration of independence, but his necessary absence from Congress prevented his signing it. On 1775, and was one of the committee appointed to draft a declaration of independence, but his necessary absence from Congress prevented his signing it. On the organization of the State of New York under a constitution, he was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in
Livingston, Robert R. 1747-1813 Statesman; born in New York City, Nov. 27, 1747; graduated at King's College in 1765; practised law successfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1775, and was one of the committee appointed to draft a declaration of independence, but his necessary absence from Congress prevented his signing it. On the organization of the State of New York under a constitution, he was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in
Livingston, Robert R. 1747-1813 Statesman; born in New York City, Nov. 27, 1747; graduated at King's College in 1765; practised law successfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1775, and was one of the committee appointed to draft a declaration of independence, but his necessary absence from Congress prevented his signing it. On the organization of the State of New York under a constitution, he was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in
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