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division. In his rear, at Warrenton Junction, was Porter's command (the 5th Army Corps). Anticipating an attack from the Confederate forces on the morning of the 28th, Hooker's command being out of ammunition at the time, and in order that he might be prepared for this attack, and also that he might have his troops up and well ithe morning that he was ordered to march there was no obstruction whatever on the road; and that the road was kept clear until after daylight on the morning of the 28th, at which time General Porter's orders required him to be at Bristoe Station, but that the wagons left the park on the supposition that the troops had passed, and they did again enter the road after daylight on the 28th, and that the only obstruction that there was to his march was the road being obstructed after the time he was to have been at Bristoe Station; that he did not move his command the next morning until after these parked trains had commenced pulling out into the road to move t
2,000 men, moved on that night, with all their wagons and baggage, from Centreville to the position which they held on the 29th, the day of the battle. I would like General Grant to answer the question how it was that the whole Confederate army eneral Porter did not only disobey the 6.30 order of the 27th, but disobeyed the three o'clock order of the morning of the 29th, which directed him to move on to Centreville; that he disobeyed the order delivered to him about nine o'clock on the morning of the 29th, ordering him to push forward to Gainesville, in not leaving until ten o'clock; that he disobeyed it in not pushing forward; that he utterly disobeyed the 4.30 order directing him to attack the enemy's right flank; and, in fact, that agement of the 29th. General Smith, who is now a paymaster of the army, in a conversation with Pope, on the morning of the 29th, told General Pope that General Porter would fail him in that battle. Gen. Ben Roberts did the same thing. Porter did fa
, rising from the rank of private to that of lieutenant and quartermaster. He was admitted to the practice of law in 1852; was in the Illinois legislature, and in Congress from 1859 to 1862. He was a private in a John Alexander Logan. Michigan regiment at the battle of Bull Run (July, 1861); returned to Illinois and raised the 31st Illinois Infantry, of which he was commissioned colonel; was wounded at Fort Donelson; and the following month (March, 1862) was made a brigadier-general. In April of the same year he was promoted to major-general, and commanded a division in the Vicksburg and Atlanta campaigns (1863-64). He was one of the most successful volunteer generals. He was again elected to Congress in 1866 and remained in the House till March 4, 1871, when he entered the Senate, having been elected to succeed Richard Yates. At the expiration of this term in 1877 he was defeated for reelection; but in 1879 he was a successful candidate, and held this seat by re-election in 18
ons for it, but at once sent a request that the general commanding should send back cavalry and clear the road near him of encumbrances, so that the march might be unobstructed. General Grant also says that a literal obedience to the order of Aug. 27 was a physical impossibility. It is further shown that General Porter was desirous of obeying it literally so far as it was practicable, but was prevailed upon by his leading generals not to do so. General Grant also says: If the night hadture Pope's or McDowell's clothing, nor could they capture McDowell's whiskey, as it was equally well known in the army and by all his acquaintances that he never used liquor in his life of any kind. This letter is as follows: Warrenton, August 27th—P. M. To General Burnside: Morell left his medicine, ammunition, and baggage at Kelly's Ford. Can you have it hauled to Fredericksburg and stored? His wagons were all sent to you for grain and ammunition. I have sent back to you every m
ossible to pass Porter's forces in the road with his command, went back and took his command on a road off to the right, reaching out to the rear of Pope's forces that were then engaged in battle. He marched, and arrived in time to put his forces in action, and fought them until nine o'clock that evening. General Grant says: And now it is known by others, as it was known by Porter at the time, that Longstreet, with some 25,000 men, was in position confronting Porter by twelve o'clock on Aug. 29, four and a half hours before the 4.30 order was written. Upon what this statement of General Grant is based it is impossible for me to understand. In the first place, Porter did not know that Longstreet was there with 25,000 men, nor did he know, unless he made a false statement, anything about the force except what General McDowell told him was his information received from General Buford. Nor was Longstreet confronting Porter. He was 2 1/2 miles away from Porter; was not on the same
as made at twelve o'clock at night by Anthony Wayne. He will find also that George Washington crossed the Delaware in small boats on the night of Dec. 25, 1776, when the ice was gorging, floating, and crushing everywhere, and on the 26th the surrender of Colonel Rolf was made. Would General Grant pretend to compare the march that Porter was required to make in the night-time with the crossing of the Delaware when the stream was gorged with ice? He will see also that on the night of Aug. 29, 1776, Washington withdrew from the front of the enemy and crossed over from Long Island to New York over a broad river. General Grant well remembers the passing of Vicksburg on a dark, foggy night in small steamers, old and unsafe, under the rain of shot and shell, as pouring down from the heavens. He will remember the march made the night before the battle of Thompson's Hill, where many troops were moved in the darkness of night. I myself marched my division from Hard times Landing to B
December 25th, 1776 AD (search for this): entry logan-john-alexander
arthagenian, marches made by these Romans were successfully made after night. Also his reading will tell him that, at the battle of Saratoga, Colonel Brooks after night turned Burgoyne's right, and Burgoyne had to escape by withdrawing his whole force. He will also find that the assault on and the capture of Stony Point, on July 15, 1779, was made at twelve o'clock at night by Anthony Wayne. He will find also that George Washington crossed the Delaware in small boats on the night of Dec. 25, 1776, when the ice was gorging, floating, and crushing everywhere, and on the 26th the surrender of Colonel Rolf was made. Would General Grant pretend to compare the march that Porter was required to make in the night-time with the crossing of the Delaware when the stream was gorged with ice? He will see also that on the night of Aug. 29, 1776, Washington withdrew from the front of the enemy and crossed over from Long Island to New York over a broad river. General Grant well remembers t
October 10th, 1777 AD (search for this): entry logan-john-alexander
ock, and they will go quickly, readily, and easier if every officer does his duty, but without it be as easily disordered, because neglect from any one, like the stopping of a wheel, disorders the whole. The general therefore expects that every officer will duly consider the importance of the observation. Their own reputation and the duty they owe to their country claims it of them, and earnestly calls upon them to do it. This order was issued at General Washington's headquarters on Oct. 10, 1777, at Taomensing. This much I have said, based upon undisputed testimony, in answer to General Grant's justification of Porter's disobedience of Pope's order of 6.30 P. M., Aug. 27, 1862. I now desire to examine the position of General Grant in his justification of Porter in the disobedience of what is known as the 4.30 P. M. order of the 29th, delivered to Porter by Capt. Douglas Pope; but, in order to get a better understanding of this part of the case, it will be necessary to take
ground overlooking the camp of Darius at daylight. He will also find in the battle of Metaurus, where Nero, Lirius, and Porcius succeeded in taking Hasdrubal, the Carthagenian, marches made by these Romans were successfully made after night. Also his reading will tell him that, at the battle of Saratoga, Colonel Brooks after night turned Burgoyne's right, and Burgoyne had to escape by withdrawing his whole force. He will also find that the assault on and the capture of Stony Point, on July 15, 1779, was made at twelve o'clock at night by Anthony Wayne. He will find also that George Washington crossed the Delaware in small boats on the night of Dec. 25, 1776, when the ice was gorging, floating, and crushing everywhere, and on the 26th the surrender of Colonel Rolf was made. Would General Grant pretend to compare the march that Porter was required to make in the night-time with the crossing of the Delaware when the stream was gorged with ice? He will see also that on the night
Logan, John Alexander 1826-1886 Statesman; born in Jackson county, Ill., Feb. 9, 1826; received a common school education; served in the Mexican War, rising from the rank of private to that of lieutenant and quartermaster. He was admitted to the practice of law in 1852; was in the Illinois legislature, and in Congress from 1859 to 1862. He was a private in a John Alexander Logan. Michigan regiment at the battle of Bull Run (July, 1861); returned to Illinois and raised the 31st Illinois Infantry, of which he was commissioned colonel; was wounded at Fort Donelson; and the following month (March, 1862) was made a brigadier-general. In April of the same year he was promoted to major-general, and commanded a division in the Vicksburg and Atlanta campaigns (1863-64). He was one of the most successful volunteer generals. He was again elected to Congress in 1866 and remained in the House till March 4, 1871, when he entered the Senate, having been elected to succeed Richard Yates. A
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