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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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Lyman, Phineas 1716- Military officer; born in Durham, Conn., about 1716. Educated at Yale College, he was a tutor there from 1738 to 1741. He engaged in mercantile pursuits, but finally became a lawyer in Suffield. There he was a magistrate for some years, and took a conspicuous part in the disputes between Massachusetts and Connecticut concerning the town of Suffield. At the breaking out of the French and Indian War he was commander-in-chief of the Connecticut forces; he built Fort Ly1716. Educated at Yale College, he was a tutor there from 1738 to 1741. He engaged in mercantile pursuits, but finally became a lawyer in Suffield. There he was a magistrate for some years, and took a conspicuous part in the disputes between Massachusetts and Connecticut concerning the town of Suffield. At the breaking out of the French and Indian War he was commander-in-chief of the Connecticut forces; he built Fort Lyman (afterwards Fort Edward), on the upper Hudson, and fought and won the battle at the head of Lake George in 1755. In 1758 he served under General Abercrombie, and was with Lord Howe when he was killed. He was also at the capture of Crown Point and Montreal, and, in 1762, led provincial troops against Havana. In 1763 General Lyman went to England to get prizemoney for himself and fellow-officers and to solicit a grant of land on the Mississippi for a company called Military adventurers. He
September 10th, 1774 AD (search for this): entry lyman-phineas
g out of the French and Indian War he was commander-in-chief of the Connecticut forces; he built Fort Lyman (afterwards Fort Edward), on the upper Hudson, and fought and won the battle at the head of Lake George in 1755. In 1758 he served under General Abercrombie, and was with Lord Howe when he was killed. He was also at the capture of Crown Point and Montreal, and, in 1762, led provincial troops against Havana. In 1763 General Lyman went to England to get prizemoney for himself and fellow-officers and to solicit a grant of land on the Mississippi for a company called Military adventurers. He returned to America in 1774, at which time a tract near Natchez was granted to the petitioners; and thither he went with his eldest son, and died soon after reaching west Florida, as the region was then called, near the present Natchez, Miss., Sept. 10, 1774. The emigrants suffered great hardships, and on the conquest of the country by the Spaniards (1781-82) they took refuge in Savannah.
Lyman, Phineas 1716- Military officer; born in Durham, Conn., about 1716. Educated at Yale College, he was a tutor there from 1738 to 1741. He engaged in mercantile pursuits, but finally became a lawyer in Suffield. There he was a magistrate for some years, and took a conspicuous part in the disputes between Massachusetts and Connecticut concerning the town of Suffield. At the breaking out of the French and Indian War he was commander-in-chief of the Connecticut forces; he built Fort Lyman (afterwards Fort Edward), on the upper Hudson, and fought and won the battle at the head of Lake George in 1755. In 1758 he served under General Abercrombie, and was with Lord Howe when he was killed. He was also at the capture of Crown Point and Montreal, and, in 1762, led provincial troops against Havana. In 1763 General Lyman went to England to get prizemoney for himself and fellow-officers and to solicit a grant of land on the Mississippi for a company called Military adventurers. He
g out of the French and Indian War he was commander-in-chief of the Connecticut forces; he built Fort Lyman (afterwards Fort Edward), on the upper Hudson, and fought and won the battle at the head of Lake George in 1755. In 1758 he served under General Abercrombie, and was with Lord Howe when he was killed. He was also at the capture of Crown Point and Montreal, and, in 1762, led provincial troops against Havana. In 1763 General Lyman went to England to get prizemoney for himself and fellow-officers and to solicit a grant of land on the Mississippi for a company called Military adventurers. He returned to America in 1774, at which time a tract near Natchez was granted to the petitioners; and thither he went with his eldest son, and died soon after reaching west Florida, as the region was then called, near the present Natchez, Miss., Sept. 10, 1774. The emigrants suffered great hardships, and on the conquest of the country by the Spaniards (1781-82) they took refuge in Savannah.
g out of the French and Indian War he was commander-in-chief of the Connecticut forces; he built Fort Lyman (afterwards Fort Edward), on the upper Hudson, and fought and won the battle at the head of Lake George in 1755. In 1758 he served under General Abercrombie, and was with Lord Howe when he was killed. He was also at the capture of Crown Point and Montreal, and, in 1762, led provincial troops against Havana. In 1763 General Lyman went to England to get prizemoney for himself and fellow-officers and to solicit a grant of land on the Mississippi for a company called Military adventurers. He returned to America in 1774, at which time a tract near Natchez was granted to the petitioners; and thither he went with his eldest son, and died soon after reaching west Florida, as the region was then called, near the present Natchez, Miss., Sept. 10, 1774. The emigrants suffered great hardships, and on the conquest of the country by the Spaniards (1781-82) they took refuge in Savannah.
sachusetts and Connecticut concerning the town of Suffield. At the breaking out of the French and Indian War he was commander-in-chief of the Connecticut forces; he built Fort Lyman (afterwards Fort Edward), on the upper Hudson, and fought and won the battle at the head of Lake George in 1755. In 1758 he served under General Abercrombie, and was with Lord Howe when he was killed. He was also at the capture of Crown Point and Montreal, and, in 1762, led provincial troops against Havana. In 1763 General Lyman went to England to get prizemoney for himself and fellow-officers and to solicit a grant of land on the Mississippi for a company called Military adventurers. He returned to America in 1774, at which time a tract near Natchez was granted to the petitioners; and thither he went with his eldest son, and died soon after reaching west Florida, as the region was then called, near the present Natchez, Miss., Sept. 10, 1774. The emigrants suffered great hardships, and on the conquest
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