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Gideon Johnson Pillow (search for this): entry missouri
Confederate States as a mere outward ceremony to give notice to others of an act already consummated in the hearts of the people; consequently, no authority of the United States will hereafter be permitted in Missouri. This short way of transferring the allegiance of the people of a State from one power to another was followed by the announcement, in the same proclamation, that they were placed under the military rule of the Confederacy, and that by invitation of Governor Jackson, Gen. Gideon J. Pillow (q. v.), of Tennessee, had already entered Missouri with troops. The fugitive governor (Jackson) had been to Richmond to prepare the way for the admission of Missouri into the Confederacy. From New Madrid he proclaimed, Aug. 5, 1861, that Missouri was a sovereign, free, and independent republic. On the 20th of the same month the Confederate Congress at Richmond passed an act to aid the State of Missouri in repelling invasion by the United States, and to authorize the admission of
Joseph W. McClurg (search for this): entry missouri
sNov., 1840 M. M. MarmadukeactingFeb. 9, 1844 John C. Edwards (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1844 Austin A. King (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1848 Sterling Price (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1852 Trusten Polk (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1856 Hancock JacksonactingMarch, 1857 Robert M. Stewart (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1857 Claiborne F. Jackson (Dem.)term beginsJan. 4, 1861 H. R. Gamble (provisional)electedJuly 31, 1861 Willard P. HallactingJan. 31, 1864 Thomas C. Fletcher (Rep.)term beginsJan. 31, 1865 Joseph W. McClurg (Rep.)term beginsJan. 31, 1869 R. Gratz Brown (Lib.)term beginsJan. 31, 1871 Silas Woodson (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1873 Charles H. Hardin (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1875 John S. Phelps (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1877 Thos. T. Crittenden (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1881 John S. Marmaduke (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1885 Albert G. MorehouseactingDec. 28, 1887 David R. Francis (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1889 William J. Stone (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1893 Lou V. Stephensterm beginsJan., 18
Charles H. Hardin (search for this): entry missouri
ng Price (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1852 Trusten Polk (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1856 Hancock JacksonactingMarch, 1857 Robert M. Stewart (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1857 Claiborne F. Jackson (Dem.)term beginsJan. 4, 1861 H. R. Gamble (provisional)electedJuly 31, 1861 Willard P. HallactingJan. 31, 1864 Thomas C. Fletcher (Rep.)term beginsJan. 31, 1865 Joseph W. McClurg (Rep.)term beginsJan. 31, 1869 R. Gratz Brown (Lib.)term beginsJan. 31, 1871 Silas Woodson (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1873 Charles H. Hardin (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1875 John S. Phelps (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1877 Thos. T. Crittenden (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1881 John S. Marmaduke (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1885 Albert G. MorehouseactingDec. 28, 1887 David R. Francis (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1889 William J. Stone (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1893 Lou V. Stephensterm beginsJan., 1897 A. M. Dockeryterm beginsJan., 1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. David Barton17th to 21st1821 to 1831 Thomas H.
Samuel Ryan Curtis (search for this): entry missouri
, battle at the), Gen. Henry W. Halleck, who had succeeded to the command of the Department of Missouri, prepared to put forth more vigorous efforts to purge the State of Confederates. On Dec. 3, 1861, he declared martial law in St. Louis, and afterwards extended it to all railroads and their vicinities. Meanwhile Price, being promised reinforcements from Arkansas, moved back to Springfield, where he concentrated about 12,000 men, and prepared to spend the winter there. Halleck sent Gen. S. R. Curtis to drive him out of the State. Curtis was assisted by Generals Davis, Sigel, Asboth, and Prentiss. They moved in three columns. Early in February, 1862, Price fled into Kansas, whither he was pursued by Curtis; and Halleck wrote to his government, late in February, that he had purged Missouri, and that the flag of the Union was waving in triumph over the soil of Arkansas. In accomplishing this work no less than sixty battles—most of them skirmishes—had been fought on Missouri soil,
August 1st, 1825 AD (search for this): entry missouri
a popular vote in June following. During the war Missouri furnished to the National army 108,773 troops. In 1869 the legislature of Missouri ratified the Fifteenth Amendment to the national Constitution. Population in 1890, 2,679,184; in 1900, 3,106,665. See United States, Missouri, in vol. IX. Territorial Governor. William Clarkassumes dutiesJuly, 1813 State governors. Alexander McNairterm beginsSept. 19, 1820 Frederick Batesterm beginsNov., 1824 Abraham J. WilliamsactingAug. 1, 1825 Gen. John Millerterm beginsNov., 1825 Daniel Dunklinterm beginsNov., 1832 Lilburn W. Boggsterm beginsNov., 1836 Thomas Reynolds (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1840 M. M. MarmadukeactingFeb. 9, 1844 John C. Edwards (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1844 Austin A. King (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1848 Sterling Price (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1852 Trusten Polk (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1856 Hancock JacksonactingMarch, 1857 Robert M. Stewart (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1857 Claiborne F. Jackson (Dem.)term beginsJan
September 19th, 1820 AD (search for this): entry missouri
on assembled at St. Louis and framed a new constitution, which was ratified by a popular vote in June following. During the war Missouri furnished to the National army 108,773 troops. In 1869 the legislature of Missouri ratified the Fifteenth Amendment to the national Constitution. Population in 1890, 2,679,184; in 1900, 3,106,665. See United States, Missouri, in vol. IX. Territorial Governor. William Clarkassumes dutiesJuly, 1813 State governors. Alexander McNairterm beginsSept. 19, 1820 Frederick Batesterm beginsNov., 1824 Abraham J. WilliamsactingAug. 1, 1825 Gen. John Millerterm beginsNov., 1825 Daniel Dunklinterm beginsNov., 1832 Lilburn W. Boggsterm beginsNov., 1836 Thomas Reynolds (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1840 M. M. MarmadukeactingFeb. 9, 1844 John C. Edwards (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1844 Austin A. King (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1848 Sterling Price (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1852 Trusten Polk (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1856 Hancock JacksonactingMarch, 1857 Robert M.
the country on the east bank of the Mississippi became the property of the United States. American settlers crossed the Mississippi, and collisions with the Spanish authorities ensued. Diplomacy settled the disputes, and the navigation of the Mississippi was made free to both parties. The purchase of Louisiana (q. v.) made a final settlement. It was divided into the Territory of New Orleans and the District of Louisiana. The latter was admitted into the Union as the State of Louisiana in 1812. The name of the District of Louisiana was changed to Missouri, and at that time the population was full 22,000. In 1817 it had increased to 60,000, and application was made to Congress for permission to frame a State constitution. It was framed, and application was made for the admission of Missouri as a State. Then came the struggle between the friends and foes of the slavelabor system, which ended in the famous compromise (see Missouri compromise), in accordance with the provisions of
January, 1893 AD (search for this): entry missouri
(Rep.)term beginsJan. 31, 1865 Joseph W. McClurg (Rep.)term beginsJan. 31, 1869 R. Gratz Brown (Lib.)term beginsJan. 31, 1871 Silas Woodson (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1873 Charles H. Hardin (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1875 John S. Phelps (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1877 Thos. T. Crittenden (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1881 John S. Marmaduke (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1885 Albert G. MorehouseactingDec. 28, 1887 David R. Francis (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1889 William J. Stone (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1893 Lou V. Stephensterm beginsJan., 1897 A. M. Dockeryterm beginsJan., 1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. David Barton17th to 21st1821 to 1831 Thomas H. Benton17th to 31st1821 to 1851 Alexander Buckner22d1831 to 1833 Lewis F. Linn23d to 27th1833 to 1843 David R. Atchison28th to 33d1843 to 1856 Henry S. Geyer32d to 34th1851 to 1857 James Stephen Green34th to 36th1857 to 1861 Trusten Polk35th to 37th1857 to 1862 Waldo P. Johnson37th1861 to 1862 John B. Hende
ssissippi, and collisions with the Spanish authorities ensued. Diplomacy settled the disputes, and the navigation of the Mississippi was made free to both parties. The purchase of Louisiana (q. v.) made a final settlement. It was divided into the Territory of New Orleans and the District of Louisiana. The latter was admitted into the Union as the State of Louisiana in 1812. The name of the District of Louisiana was changed to Missouri, and at that time the population was full 22,000. In 1817 it had increased to 60,000, and application was made to Congress for permission to frame a State constitution. It was framed, and application was made for the admission of Missouri as a State. Then came the struggle between the friends and foes of the slavelabor system, which ended in the famous compromise (see Missouri compromise), in accordance with the provisions of which State seal of Missouri. Missouri was admitted to the Union, Aug. 10, 1821. From that time the material prosperity
States, and to authorize the admission of said State as a member of the Confederate States of America. Measures were speedily adopted for the consummation of the alliance, and during a greater portion of the war men claiming to represent the people of Missouri occupied seats in the Confederate Congress at Richmond. The old legislature of Missouri met at Neosho, Oct. 21, and on the 28th passed an ordinance of secession. An act to provide for the defence of the State of Missouri was adopted Nov. 1, in which provision was made for the issue of what were called defence bonds to the amount of $10,000,000, payable in three, five, and seven years. As before indicated, popular feeling in Missouri was opposed to secession, but the State authorities favored it. Civil On the Levee, St. Louis. General Lyon's March to Booneville. war was begun there by the governor (C. F. Jackson), who, on June 12, 1861, issued a call for the active service of 50,000 of the State militia, for the purpos
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