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Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): entry missouri
grant of Louis XIV. to Crozat, Sept. 14, 1712, all the country drained by the waters emptying, directly or indirectly, into the Mississippi River, is included in the boundaries of Louisiana. In northern Louisiana were included Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska. Below the Missouri the settlements were more rapid. In 1720 the discovery of lead-mines within its present borders drew adventurers there. Its oldest to town, St. Genevieve, was founded in 1755, and, by the treaty of Paris, in 1763, that whole region passed into the possession of the English. Already many of the Canadian French had settled on the borders of the Mississippi. Lands were liberally granted to the colonists by the English. Emigrants from Spain flocked in. In 1775 St. Louis, which had been first a fur-trading establishment, contained 800 inhabitants, and St. Genevieve about 460. In the region of Missouri there were soon stirring events; for Spain, taking sides with the Americans, made war on the
Gasconade (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
ive service of 50,000 of the State militia, for the purpose of repelling invasion, and for the protection of the lives, liberty, and property of the citizens. Gen. Nathaniel Lyon (q. v.), in command of the Department of Missouri, moved against Governor Jackson as soon as the latter had raised the standard of revolt at Jefferson City. He sent (July 12, 1861) a regiment of Missouri volunteers, under Col. Franz Sigel (q. v.) to occupy and protect the Pacific Railway from St. Louis to the Gasconade River, preparatory to a movement southward to oppose an invasion by Gen. Benjamin McCulloch, a Texan ranger, who had crossed the Arkansas frontier with about 800 men, and was marching on Springfield. Lyon left St. Louis (June 13) with 2,000 men, on two steamboats, for Jefferson City, to drive Jackson and Price out of it. The Missouri troops were commanded by Colonels Blair and Boernstein, the regulars by Captain Lathrop, and the artillery by Capt. J. Totten. The Confederates fled westward t
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
included in the boundaries of Louisiana. In northern Louisiana were included Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska. Below the Missouri the settlements werighboring States. Sigel was pushing forward towards the borders of Kansas and Arkansas to open the campaign. The capture of the Confederate troops at St. Louis (q. ads and their vicinities. Meanwhile Price, being promised reinforcements from Arkansas, moved back to Springfield, where he concentrated about 12,000 men, and preparissouri, and that the flag of the Union was waving in triumph over the soil of Arkansas. In accomplishing this work no less than sixty battles—most of them skirmishe expedition (q. v.), the Confederates, by raiding bands, awed the Unionists in Arkansas into inactivity, and gave General Price an opportunity, early in the fall of 1ivened by several skirmishes, and late in November Price was a fugitive in western Arkansas with a broken and dispirited army. This was the last invasion of Missouri
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
colonists by the English. Emigrants from Spain flocked in. In 1775 St. Louis, which had been first a fur-trading establishment, contained 800 inhabitants, and St. Genevieve about 460. In the region of Missouri there were soon stirring events; for Spain, taking sides with the Americans, made war on the English, and that country became master of lower Louisiana and Florida. In 1780 the British from the Lakes attacked St. Louis, but the timely arrival of Col. George Rogers Clarke (q. v.) in Illinois saved it from capture. After the war Spain retained Louisiana, and the country on the east bank of the Mississippi became the property of the United States. American settlers crossed the Mississippi, and collisions with the Spanish authorities ensued. Diplomacy settled the disputes, and the navigation of the Mississippi was made free to both parties. The purchase of Louisiana (q. v.) made a final settlement. It was divided into the Territory of New Orleans and the District of Louis
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
secession should be submitted to the people before it should be valid. The convention assembled in Jefferson City, Feb. 28. On the second day of the session it adjourned to St. Louis, where it reassembled, March 4, with Sterling Price as president, and Samuel A. Lowe as secretary. Price professed to be a Unionist, and so obtained his election. He soon afterwards became one of the most active Confederate military leaders in that region. Luther J. Glenn, an accredited commissioner from Georgia, was allowed to address the convention on the first day of the session at St. Louis. He strongly urged Missouri to join the Southern Confederacy ; but it was found that the atmosphere of St. Louis, in and out of the convention, was not congenial to the nourishment of such an idea. The population of that city was made up largely of New-Englanders and Germans, who were loyal; while emigrants from slave-labor States, especially Virginia, composed the great body of the Confederates. Glenn's
Jefferson City (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
ted to the people before it should be valid. The convention assembled in Jefferson City, Feb. 28. On the second day of the session it adjourned to St. Louis, wherntion, which had been held in February, 1861, and adjourned, reassembled at Jefferson City, on July 22, and proceeded to reorganize the civil government of the State,Governor Jackson as soon as the latter had raised the standard of revolt at Jefferson City. He sent (July 12, 1861) a regiment of Missouri volunteers, under Col. Fraield. Lyon left St. Louis (June 13) with 2,000 men, on two steamboats, for Jefferson City, to drive Jackson and Price out of it. The Missouri troops were commanded ble became quieted, and the loyal State convention was called to assemble at Jefferson City on July 22, 1861. General Lyon remained at Booneville about a fortnight, pre troops at St. Louis (q. v.) produced consternation among their friends in Jefferson City, where the Missouri legislature was in session. A bill was immediately pas
Neosho, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
20th of the same month the Confederate Congress at Richmond passed an act to aid the State of Missouri in repelling invasion by the United States, and to authorize the admission of said State as a member of the Confederate States of America. Measures were speedily adopted for the consummation of the alliance, and during a greater portion of the war men claiming to represent the people of Missouri occupied seats in the Confederate Congress at Richmond. The old legislature of Missouri met at Neosho, Oct. 21, and on the 28th passed an ordinance of secession. An act to provide for the defence of the State of Missouri was adopted Nov. 1, in which provision was made for the issue of what were called defence bonds to the amount of $10,000,000, payable in three, five, and seven years. As before indicated, popular feeling in Missouri was opposed to secession, but the State authorities favored it. Civil On the Levee, St. Louis. General Lyon's March to Booneville. war was begun there
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
e outward ceremony to give notice to others of an act already consummated in the hearts of the people; consequently, no authority of the United States will hereafter be permitted in Missouri. This short way of transferring the allegiance of the people of a State from one power to another was followed by the announcement, in the same proclamation, that they were placed under the military rule of the Confederacy, and that by invitation of Governor Jackson, Gen. Gideon J. Pillow (q. v.), of Tennessee, had already entered Missouri with troops. The fugitive governor (Jackson) had been to Richmond to prepare the way for the admission of Missouri into the Confederacy. From New Madrid he proclaimed, Aug. 5, 1861, that Missouri was a sovereign, free, and independent republic. On the 20th of the same month the Confederate Congress at Richmond passed an act to aid the State of Missouri in repelling invasion by the United States, and to authorize the admission of said State as a member of th
Nebraska (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
Missouri, Was a part of what was originally known as Upper Louisiana. By the grant of Louis XIV. to Crozat, Sept. 14, 1712, all the country drained by the waters emptying, directly or indirectly, into the Mississippi River, is included in the boundaries of Louisiana. In northern Louisiana were included Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska. Below the Missouri the settlements were more rapid. In 1720 the discovery of lead-mines within its present borders drew adventurers there. Its oldest to town, St. Genevieve, was founded in 1755, and, by the treaty of Paris, in 1763, that whole region passed into the possession of the English. Already many of the Canadian French had settled on the borders of the Mississippi. Lands were liberally granted to the colonists by the English. Emigrants from Spain flocked in. In 1775 St. Louis, which had been first a fur-trading establishment, contained 800 inhabitants, and St. Genevieve about 460. In the region of Missouri there were
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): entry missouri
Missouri, Was a part of what was originally known as Upper Louisiana. By the grant of Louis XIV. to Crozat, Sept. 14, 1712, all the country drained by the waters emptying, directly or indirectly, into the Mississippi River, is included in the boundaries of Louisiana. In northern Louisiana were included Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska. Below the Missouri the settlements were more rapid. In 1720 the discovery of lead-mines within its present borders drew adventurers there. Its oldest to town, St. Genevieve, was founded in 1755, and, by the treaty of Paris, in 1763, that whole region passed into the possession of the English. Already many of the Canadian French had settled on the borders of the Mississippi. Lands were liberally granted to the colonists by the English. Emigrants from Spain flocked in. In 1775 St. Louis, which had been first a fur-trading establishment, contained 800 inhabitants, and St. Genevieve about 460. In the region of Missouri there wer
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