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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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Nathaniel Lyon (search for this): entry missouri
bout 800 men, and was marching on Springfield. Lyon left St. Louis (June 13) with 2,000 men, on twoille. Leaving Boernstein to hold the capital, Lyon followed, June 16. He overtook the fugitives not far from Booneville. Lyon landed his men and attacked the camp of the Confederates, commanded byf a brick house. The camp was on an eminence. Lyon ascended this and opened a battle by firing inthe Confederates. A sharp fight ensued. Two of Lyon's shells entered the brick house and drove out . Leaving a company to hold the deserted camp, Lyon pushed on to Booneville. The fugitives scatteriatory and assuring proclamations from both General Lyon and Colonel Boernstein, the people became qssemble at Jefferson City on July 22, 1861. General Lyon remained at Booneville about a fortnight, prney was relieved of his command, and on May 29 Lyon, who had been commissioned (May 16) a brigadiere allowed to set foot on the soil of Missouri. Lyon refused compliance, and on the following day th[2 more...]
James Stephen Green (search for this): entry missouri
Jan. 31, 1885 Albert G. MorehouseactingDec. 28, 1887 David R. Francis (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1889 William J. Stone (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1893 Lou V. Stephensterm beginsJan., 1897 A. M. Dockeryterm beginsJan., 1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. David Barton17th to 21st1821 to 1831 Thomas H. Benton17th to 31st1821 to 1851 Alexander Buckner22d1831 to 1833 Lewis F. Linn23d to 27th1833 to 1843 David R. Atchison28th to 33d1843 to 1856 Henry S. Geyer32d to 34th1851 to 1857 James Stephen Green34th to 36th1857 to 1861 Trusten Polk35th to 37th1857 to 1862 Waldo P. Johnson37th1861 to 1862 John B. Henderson37th to 40th1862 to 1869 Robert Wilson37th1862 B. Gratz Brown38th to 39th1863 to 1867 Charles D. Drake40th to 41st1867 to 1870 Francis P. Blair, Jr41st to 42d1871 to 1873 Carl Schurz41st to 42d1869 to 1875 Lewis F. Bogy43d to 45th1873 to 1877 Francis M. Cockrell44th to—1875 to — David H. Armstrong45th1877 to 1879 George G. Vest46th to—187
Lewis F. Linn (search for this): entry missouri
Jan. 31, 1877 Thos. T. Crittenden (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1881 John S. Marmaduke (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1885 Albert G. MorehouseactingDec. 28, 1887 David R. Francis (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1889 William J. Stone (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1893 Lou V. Stephensterm beginsJan., 1897 A. M. Dockeryterm beginsJan., 1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. David Barton17th to 21st1821 to 1831 Thomas H. Benton17th to 31st1821 to 1851 Alexander Buckner22d1831 to 1833 Lewis F. Linn23d to 27th1833 to 1843 David R. Atchison28th to 33d1843 to 1856 Henry S. Geyer32d to 34th1851 to 1857 James Stephen Green34th to 36th1857 to 1861 Trusten Polk35th to 37th1857 to 1862 Waldo P. Johnson37th1861 to 1862 John B. Henderson37th to 40th1862 to 1869 Robert Wilson37th1862 B. Gratz Brown38th to 39th1863 to 1867 Charles D. Drake40th to 41st1867 to 1870 Francis P. Blair, Jr41st to 42d1871 to 1873 Carl Schurz41st to 42d1869 to 1875 Lewis F. Bogy43d to 45th1873 to 1877 Fra
William Selby Harney (search for this): entry missouri
in State bonds for war purposes. He was also authorized to purchase arms, and the whole military power of the State was placed under his control. Meanwhile General Harney had issued a proclamation denouncing the bill as an indirect secession ordinance, and null; yet, anxious for peace, he was ready to pursue a conciliatory poliecuring of the neutrality of Missouri in the impending conflict. Price, in the name of the governor, pledged the power of the State to the maintenance of order. Harney, in the name of his government, agreed to make no military movements as long as order was preserved. The loyal people were alarmed, for they well knew the governor would violate his pledge. The national government did not sanction the compact. General Harney was relieved of his command, and on May 29 Lyon, who had been commissioned (May 16) a brigadier-general, was put in his place and made commander of the Department of Missouri. The purse and sword of Missouri were in the hands of t
Alexander Sandor Asboth (search for this): entry missouri
t of Missouri, prepared to put forth more vigorous efforts to purge the State of Confederates. On Dec. 3, 1861, he declared martial law in St. Louis, and afterwards extended it to all railroads and their vicinities. Meanwhile Price, being promised reinforcements from Arkansas, moved back to Springfield, where he concentrated about 12,000 men, and prepared to spend the winter there. Halleck sent Gen. S. R. Curtis to drive him out of the State. Curtis was assisted by Generals Davis, Sigel, Asboth, and Prentiss. They moved in three columns. Early in February, 1862, Price fled into Kansas, whither he was pursued by Curtis; and Halleck wrote to his government, late in February, that he had purged Missouri, and that the flag of the Union was waving in triumph over the soil of Arkansas. In accomplishing this work no less than sixty battles—most of them skirmishes—had been fought on Missouri soil, beginning with Booneville, at the middle of June, 1861, and ending at the middle of Februa
Samuel A. Lowe (search for this): entry missouri
mmended the people to stand by their sister slave-labor States in whatever course they might pursue. He recommended the calling of a convention. This the legislature authorized (Jan. 16), but decreed that its action on the subject of secession should be submitted to the people before it should be valid. The convention assembled in Jefferson City, Feb. 28. On the second day of the session it adjourned to St. Louis, where it reassembled, March 4, with Sterling Price as president, and Samuel A. Lowe as secretary. Price professed to be a Unionist, and so obtained his election. He soon afterwards became one of the most active Confederate military leaders in that region. Luther J. Glenn, an accredited commissioner from Georgia, was allowed to address the convention on the first day of the session at St. Louis. He strongly urged Missouri to join the Southern Confederacy ; but it was found that the atmosphere of St. Louis, in and out of the convention, was not congenial to the nouris
David H. Armstrong (search for this): entry missouri
sJan. 31, 1885 Albert G. MorehouseactingDec. 28, 1887 David R. Francis (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1889 William J. Stone (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1893 Lou V. Stephensterm beginsJan., 1897 A. M. Dockeryterm beginsJan., 1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. David Barton17th to 21st1821 to 1831 Thomas H. Benton17th to 31st1821 to 1851 Alexander Buckner22d1831 to 1833 Lewis F. Linn23d to 27th1833 to 1843 David R. Atchison28th to 33d1843 to 1856 Henry S. Geyer32d to 34th1851 to 1857 James Stephen Green34th to 36th1857 to 1861 Trusten Polk35th to 37th1857 to 1862 Waldo P. Johnson37th1861 to 1862 John B. Henderson37th to 40th1862 to 1869 Robert Wilson37th1862 B. Gratz Brown38th to 39th1863 to 1867 Charles D. Drake40th to 41st1867 to 1870 Francis P. Blair, Jr41st to 42d1871 to 1873 Carl Schurz41st to 42d1869 to 1875 Lewis F. Bogy43d to 45th1873 to 1877 Francis M. Cockrell44th to—1875 to — David H. Armstrong45th1877 to 1879 George G. Vest46th to—187
William Clark (search for this): entry missouri
eft Missouri much weaker than when he entered it. On Jan. 6, 1865, another convention assembled at St. Louis and framed a new constitution, which was ratified by a popular vote in June following. During the war Missouri furnished to the National army 108,773 troops. In 1869 the legislature of Missouri ratified the Fifteenth Amendment to the national Constitution. Population in 1890, 2,679,184; in 1900, 3,106,665. See United States, Missouri, in vol. IX. Territorial Governor. William Clarkassumes dutiesJuly, 1813 State governors. Alexander McNairterm beginsSept. 19, 1820 Frederick Batesterm beginsNov., 1824 Abraham J. WilliamsactingAug. 1, 1825 Gen. John Millerterm beginsNov., 1825 Daniel Dunklinterm beginsNov., 1832 Lilburn W. Boggsterm beginsNov., 1836 Thomas Reynolds (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1840 M. M. MarmadukeactingFeb. 9, 1844 John C. Edwards (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1844 Austin A. King (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1848 Sterling Price (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1852
Thomas T. Crittenden (search for this): entry missouri
ingMarch, 1857 Robert M. Stewart (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1857 Claiborne F. Jackson (Dem.)term beginsJan. 4, 1861 H. R. Gamble (provisional)electedJuly 31, 1861 Willard P. HallactingJan. 31, 1864 Thomas C. Fletcher (Rep.)term beginsJan. 31, 1865 Joseph W. McClurg (Rep.)term beginsJan. 31, 1869 R. Gratz Brown (Lib.)term beginsJan. 31, 1871 Silas Woodson (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1873 Charles H. Hardin (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1875 John S. Phelps (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1877 Thos. T. Crittenden (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1881 John S. Marmaduke (Dem.)term beginsJan. 31, 1885 Albert G. MorehouseactingDec. 28, 1887 David R. Francis (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1889 William J. Stone (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1893 Lou V. Stephensterm beginsJan., 1897 A. M. Dockeryterm beginsJan., 1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. David Barton17th to 21st1821 to 1831 Thomas H. Benton17th to 31st1821 to 1851 Alexander Buckner22d1831 to 1833 Lewis F. Linn23d to 27th1833 to
Sterling Price (search for this): entry missouri
oats, for Jefferson City, to drive Jackson and Price out of it. The Missouri troops were commanded rner of Missouri, where he was joined by General Price, when the whole Confederate force amountedrality of Missouri in the impending conflict. Price, in the name of the governor, pledged the poweed in three columns. Early in February, 1862, Price fled into Kansas, whither he was pursued by Cuists in Arkansas into inactivity, and gave General Price an opportunity, early in the fall of 1864,ect was to give aid to the Confederate cause. Price had been promised 20,000 recruits if he should that they prudently remained in concealment. Price was disappointed; and he soon perceived that aed by several skirmishes, and late in November Price was a fugitive in western Arkansas with a brokuring the invasion was 346 killed and wounded. Price left Missouri much weaker than when he enteredustin A. King (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1848 Sterling Price (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1852 Trusten Polk [6 more...]
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