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West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
ard and some southward. With the latter went Governor Jackson. At Warsaw, on the Osage, he was joined (June 20) by 400 men under Colonel O'Kane, who had just captured and dispersed about the same number of the loyal Missouri Home Guards. The governor and his followers continued their flight to the extreme southwestern corner of Missouri, where he was joined by General Price, when the whole Confederate force amounted to full 3,000 men. At the same time Gen. J. G. Rains, a graduate of West Point, was hurrying forward to join Jackson with a considerable force, closely pursued by Major Sturgis, with a body of Kansas volunteers. Jackson was now satisfied that the whole of northern Missouri was lost to the cause of secession, and he endeavored to concentrate all the armed disloyal citizens, with McCulloch's men, in the southwestern part of the commonwealth. Assured by the aspect of affairs, and conciliatory and assuring proclamations from both General Lyon and Colonel Boernstein, th
Boonville (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
ties favored it. Civil On the Levee, St. Louis. General Lyon's March to Booneville. war was begun there by the governor (C. F. Jackson), who, on June 12, 1861, artillery by Capt. J. Totten. The Confederates fled westward to a point near Booneville. Leaving Boernstein to hold the capital, Lyon followed, June 16. He overtook the fugitives not far from Booneville. Lyon landed his men and attacked the camp of the Confederates, commanded by Colonel Marmaduke, of the State forces, some ofitary stores. Leaving a company to hold the deserted camp, Lyon pushed on to Booneville. The fugitives scattered, some going westward and some southward. With the lled to assemble at Jefferson City on July 22, 1861. General Lyon remained at Booneville about a fortnight, preparing for a vigorous campaign in the southwest. He thtles—most of them skirmishes—had been fought on Missouri soil, beginning with Booneville, at the middle of June, 1861, and ending at the middle of February, 1862. Th
Santa Genoveva (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
northern Louisiana were included Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska. Below the Missouri the settlements were more rapid. In 1720 the discovery of lead-mines within its present borders drew adventurers there. Its oldest to town, St. Genevieve, was founded in 1755, and, by the treaty of Paris, in 1763, that whole region passed into the possession of the English. Already many of the Canadian French had settled on the borders of the Mississippi. Lands were liberally granted to the colonists by the English. Emigrants from Spain flocked in. In 1775 St. Louis, which had been first a fur-trading establishment, contained 800 inhabitants, and St. Genevieve about 460. In the region of Missouri there were soon stirring events; for Spain, taking sides with the Americans, made war on the English, and that country became master of lower Louisiana and Florida. In 1780 the British from the Lakes attacked St. Louis, but the timely arrival of Col. George Rogers Clarke (q. v.) in Ill
, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
aid to the Confederate cause. Price had been promised 20,000 recruits if he should enter Missouri with a respectable military force. He and General Shelby crossed the Missouri border early in September with 20,000 followers, and pushed on to Pilot Knob, half-way to St. Louis. But the promised recruits did not appear. The vigilant Rosecrans, then in command of the Department of the Missouri, had discovered Price's plans and, by some arrests, had so frightened the remainder that they prudently remained in concealment. Price was disappointed; and he soon perceived that a web of great peril was gathering around him. General Ewing, with a brigade of National troops struck him an astounding blow at Pilot Knob. Soon afterwards these and other troops under Gen. A. J. Smith and General Mower sent Price flying westward towards Kansas, closely pursued. This chase was enlivened by several skirmishes, and late in November Price was a fugitive in western Arkansas with a broken and dispirited
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
d in the boundaries of Louisiana. In northern Louisiana were included Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska. Below the Missouri the settlements were more rapid. In 1720 the discovery of leward to join Jackson with a considerable force, closely pursued by Major Sturgis, with a body of Kansas volunteers. Jackson was now satisfied that the whole of northern Missouri was lost to the cause-eight hours from camps in neighboring States. Sigel was pushing forward towards the borders of Kansas and Arkansas to open the campaign. The capture of the Confederate troops at St. Louis (q. v.) pl, Asboth, and Prentiss. They moved in three columns. Early in February, 1862, Price fled into Kansas, whither he was pursued by Curtis; and Halleck wrote to his government, late in February, that hese and other troops under Gen. A. J. Smith and General Mower sent Price flying westward towards Kansas, closely pursued. This chase was enlivened by several skirmishes, and late in November Price wa
United States (United States) (search for this): entry missouri
on the east bank of the Mississippi became the property of the United States. American settlers crossed the Mississippi, and collisions witry force by the seceding States to assail the government of the United States, would inevitably lead to civil war; and earnestly entreated thrdinance for the separation from the North and union with the Confederate States as a mere outward ceremony to give notice to others of an act in the hearts of the people; consequently, no authority of the United States will hereafter be permitted in Missouri. This short way of tran act to aid the State of Missouri in repelling invasion by the United States, and to authorize the admission of said State as a member of the Confederate States of America. Measures were speedily adopted for the consummation of the alliance, and during a greater portion of the waensterm beginsJan., 1897 A. M. Dockeryterm beginsJan., 1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. David Barton17th to 21s
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
glish. Already many of the Canadian French had settled on the borders of the Mississippi. Lands were liberally granted to the colonists by the English. Emigrants from Spain flocked in. In 1775 St. Louis, which had been first a fur-trading establishment, contained 800 inhabitants, and St. Genevieve about 460. In the region of Missouri there were soon stirring events; for Spain, taking sides with the Americans, made war on the English, and that country became master of lower Louisiana and Florida. In 1780 the British from the Lakes attacked St. Louis, but the timely arrival of Col. George Rogers Clarke (q. v.) in Illinois saved it from capture. After the war Spain retained Louisiana, and the country on the east bank of the Mississippi became the property of the United States. American settlers crossed the Mississippi, and collisions with the Spanish authorities ensued. Diplomacy settled the disputes, and the navigation of the Mississippi was made free to both parties. The p
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
tect the Pacific Railway from St. Louis to the Gasconade River, preparatory to a movement southward to oppose an invasion by Gen. Benjamin McCulloch, a Texan ranger, who had crossed the Arkansas frontier with about 800 men, and was marching on Springfield. Lyon left St. Louis (June 13) with 2,000 men, on two steamboats, for Jefferson City, to drive Jackson and Price out of it. The Missouri troops were commanded by Colonels Blair and Boernstein, the regulars by Captain Lathrop, and the artiller efforts to purge the State of Confederates. On Dec. 3, 1861, he declared martial law in St. Louis, and afterwards extended it to all railroads and their vicinities. Meanwhile Price, being promised reinforcements from Arkansas, moved back to Springfield, where he concentrated about 12,000 men, and prepared to spend the winter there. Halleck sent Gen. S. R. Curtis to drive him out of the State. Curtis was assisted by Generals Davis, Sigel, Asboth, and Prentiss. They moved in three columns.
Missouri (United States) (search for this): entry missouri
ens, with McCulloch's men, in the southwestern part of the commonwealth. Assured by the aspect of affairs, and conciliatory and assuring proclamations from both General Lyon and Colonel Boernstein, the people became quieted, and the loyal State convention was called to assemble at Jefferson City on July 22, 1861. General Lyon remained at Booneville about a fortnight, preparing for a vigorous campaign in the southwest. He then held military control over the whole region northward of the Missouri River, and on July 1 there were at least 10,000 loyal troops in Missouri, and 10,000 more might have been there within forty-eight hours from camps in neighboring States. Sigel was pushing forward towards the borders of Kansas and Arkansas to open the campaign. The capture of the Confederate troops at St. Louis (q. v.) produced consternation among their friends in Jefferson City, where the Missouri legislature was in session. A bill was immediately passed by which the governor was authorize
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): entry missouri
Missouri, Was a part of what was originally known as Upper Louisiana. By the grant of Louis XIV. to Crozat, Sept. 14, 1712, all the country drained by the waters emptying, directly or indirectly, into the Mississippi River, is included in the boundaries of Louisiana. In northern Louisiana were included Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska. Below the Missouri the settlements were more rapid. In 1720 the discovery of lead-mines within its present borders drew adventurers there. Its oldest to town, St. Genevieve, was founded in 1755, and, by the treaty of Paris, in 1763, that whole region passed into the possession of the English. Already many of the Canadian French had settled on the borders of the Mississippi. Lands were liberally granted to the colonists by the English. Emigrants from Spain flocked in. In 1775 St. Louis, which had been first a fur-trading establishment, contained 800 inhabitants, and St. Genevieve about 460. In the region of Missouri there were
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