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Shrewsbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry new-jersey
olls with the armament was still on the ocean, the duke granted that portion of his terri- A bit of Trenton, capital of New Jersey. tory lying between the Hudson and Delaware rivers to two of his favorites, Lord Berkeley, brother of the governor of Virginia (see Berkeley, Sir William), and Sir George Carteret, who, as governor of the island of Jersey, had defended it against the parliamentary troops. Settlements under Nicolls's grants had already been begun at Newark, Middletown, and Shrewsbury, when news of the grant reached New York. Nicolls was amazed at the folly of the duke in parting with such a splendid domain, which lay between the two great rivers and extended north from Cape May to lat. 40° 40′. The tract was named New Jersey in compliment to Carteret. The new proprietors formed a constitution for the colonists. Philip Carteret, cousin of Sir George, was sent over as governor of New Jersey, and emigrants began to flock in, for the terms to settlers were generous, and
Lawrence (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry new-jersey
al Maxwell surprised Elizabethtown and took nearly 100 prisoners. General Dickinson, with 400 New Jersey militia and fifty Pennsylvania riflemen, crossed Millstone River near Somerset Court-house (June 20, 1777), and attacked a large British foraging party, nine of whom were taken prisoners; the rest escaped, but forty wagons, with much booty, fell into the general's hands. About a month later, Colonel Nelson, of New Brunswick, with a detachment of 150 militiamen, surprised and captured at Lawrence's Neck a major and fifty-nine privates of a Tory corps in the pay of the British. The national Constitution was adopted by unanimous vote in December, 1787, and the State capital was established at Trenton in 1790. The present constitution was ratified Aug. 13, 1844, and has been Seal of the State of New Jersey. amended several times since. During the Civil War New Jersey furnished the National army with 79,511 troops. In 1870 the legislature refused to ratify the Fifteenth Amendmen
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry new-jersey
d an assembly at Elizabethtown in the spring of 1672, formally deposed Philip Carteret, and elected James their governor. Philip, in the early summer, sailed for England and laid the matter before his superiors. He knew the administration of his cousin would be a chastisement of the people, as it proved to be, for he was utterly t, at Salem, on the Delaware, and arranging to dispose of the remainder for the benefit of Billinge's creditors. Meanwhile, a large immigration of Quakers from England had occurred, and these settled below the Raritan, under a liberal government. Andros required them to acknowledge his authority as the representative of the dukrclay governor. He was a young Scotch Quaker and one of the purchasers, who afterwards became one of the most eminent writers of that denomination. Quakers from England and Scotland and others from Long Island flocked into east Jersey, but they were compelled to endure the tyranny of Andros until James was driven from his throne
United States (United States) (search for this): entry new-jersey
he tenets of their sect would not allow them to go to law, so they referred the matter to William Penn, whose decision satisfied both parties. Fenwick sailed for America to found a colony, but Billinge was too much in debt to come, and made an assignment for the benefit of his creditors. The greater part of his right and title iners from Long Island flocked into east Jersey, but they were compelled to endure the tyranny of Andros until James was driven from his throne and the viceroy from America, when east and west Jersey were left without a regular civil government, and so remained several years. Finally, wearied with contentions and subjected to losses Leon Abbett 1884 Robert S. Green 1887 Leon Abbett 1890 George T. Werts1893 John W. Griggs 1896 David O. WatkinsFeb. 1, 1898 Foster M. Voorhees 1899 United States Senators. Name. No. of Congress. Term. Jonathan Elmer 1st to 2d 1789 to 1791 William Patterson1st 1789 to 1790 Philemon Dickerson 1st to 3d 1790 to 1791 J
Burlington (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry new-jersey
e slaves. It remained a dependency of New York until 1738, when it was made an independent colony, and so remained until the Revolutionary War. Lewis Morris, who was the chief-justice of New Jersey, was commissioned its governor, and was the first who ruled over the free colony (see Morris, Lewis). William Franklin, son of Benjamin Franklin, was the last of the royal governors of New Jersey (see Franklin, William). A conditional State constitution was adopted in the Provincial Congress at Burlington, July 2, 1776, and a State government was organized with William Livingston as governor. After the battle of Princeton and the retreat of the British to New Brunswick, detachments of American militia were very active in the Jerseys. Four days after that event nearly fifty Waldeckers (Germans) were killed, wounded, or made prisoners at Springfield. General Maxwell surprised Elizabethtown and took nearly 100 prisoners. General Dickinson, with 400 New Jersey militia and fifty Pennsylvani
vince of New Jersey into two great portions—east Jersey, including all that part lying northeast ofince originally granted by the Duke of York East Jersey was the property of Sir George Carteret; wewest Jersey passed into the hands of the associates of the Society of Friends. West Jersey was now die colonists. The first popular Assembly in west Jersey met at Salem in November, 1681, and adoptedlliam Penn and others bought from his heirs east Jersey, and appointed Robert Barclay governor. Hend and others from Long Island flocked into east Jersey, but they were compelled to endure the tyraand the viceroy from America, when east and west Jersey were left without a regular civil governmens, under Duke of Yorkassumes office 1674 East Jersey. West Jersey. Philip Carteret 1676 Board oWest Jersey. Philip Carteret 1676 Board of Commissioners 1676 Robert Barclay 1682 Edward Billinge 1679 Thomas Rudyard, deputy 1682 Samuel ward Hunloke, deputy 1690 John Tatham 1690 West Jersey Proprietors 1691 Col. Joseph Dudley 1691 A[3 more...]
Bergen county (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry new-jersey
New Jersey, Was one of the thirteen original colonies. Its territory was claimed to be a part of New Netherland. A few Dutch traders from New Amsterdam seem to have settled at Bergen about 1620, and in 1623 a company led by Capt. Jacobus May built Fort Nassau, at the mouth of the Timmer Kill, near Gloucester. There four young married couples, with a few others, began a settlement the same year. In 1634, Sir Edward Plowden obtained a grant of land on the New Jersey side of the Delaware from the English monarch, and called it New Albion, and four years later some Swedes and Fins bought land from the Indians in the vicinity and began some settlements. These and the Dutch drove off the English, and in 1665 Stuyvesant dispossessed the Swedes. After the grant of New Netherland (1664) to the Duke of York by his brother, Charles II., the former sent Col. Richard Nicolls with a land and naval force to take possession of the domain. Nicolls was made the first English governor of the
Middletown (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry new-jersey
. But while Nicolls with the armament was still on the ocean, the duke granted that portion of his terri- A bit of Trenton, capital of New Jersey. tory lying between the Hudson and Delaware rivers to two of his favorites, Lord Berkeley, brother of the governor of Virginia (see Berkeley, Sir William), and Sir George Carteret, who, as governor of the island of Jersey, had defended it against the parliamentary troops. Settlements under Nicolls's grants had already been begun at Newark, Middletown, and Shrewsbury, when news of the grant reached New York. Nicolls was amazed at the folly of the duke in parting with such a splendid domain, which lay between the two great rivers and extended north from Cape May to lat. 40° 40′. The tract was named New Jersey in compliment to Carteret. The new proprietors formed a constitution for the colonists. Philip Carteret, cousin of Sir George, was sent over as governor of New Jersey, and emigrants began to flock in, for the terms to settlers we
Quaker (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry new-jersey
refused, because the territory had passed out of the possession of James. The case was referred to Sir William Jones, the eminent jurist and Oriental scholar, who decided in favor of the colonists. The first popular Assembly in west Jersey met at Salem in November, 1681, and adopted a code of laws for the government of the people. Late in 1679 Carteret died; and in 1682 William Penn and others bought from his heirs east Jersey, and appointed Robert Barclay governor. He was a young Scotch Quaker and one of the purchasers, who afterwards became one of the most eminent writers of that denomination. Quakers from England and Scotland and others from Long Island flocked into east Jersey, but they were compelled to endure the tyranny of Andros until James was driven from his throne and the viceroy from America, when east and west Jersey were left without a regular civil government, and so remained several years. Finally, wearied with contentions and subjected to losses, the proprietors
South river (United States) (search for this): entry new-jersey
milies of whom at once seated themselves at Elizabethtown. But while Nicolls with the armament was still on the ocean, the duke granted that portion of his terri- A bit of Trenton, capital of New Jersey. tory lying between the Hudson and Delaware rivers to two of his favorites, Lord Berkeley, brother of the governor of Virginia (see Berkeley, Sir William), and Sir George Carteret, who, as governor of the island of Jersey, had defended it against the parliamentary troops. Settlements underie, Lucas, and Billinge on the other, which divided the province of New Jersey into two great portions—east Jersey, including all that part lying northeast of a line drawn from Little Egg Harbor to a point on the most northerly branch of the Delaware River, in lat. 41° 40′ N.; and west Jersey, comprehending all the rest of the province originally granted by the Duke of York East Jersey was the property of Sir George Carteret; west Jersey passed into the hands of the associates of the Society of
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