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Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): entry newspapers
tween the two functions of the newspaper has been fairly maintained, owing to the peculiar circumstances of the country. Its great foreign trade and its large colonial possessions have, ever since the newspaper took its rise, given early and accurate intelligence a great commercial value, and the proprietors of leading journals have from the first carefully cultivated it. The story of Rothschild laying the foundation of his great fortune by being the first to reach London with the news of Waterloo is an illustration of the importance which reliable foreign intelligence has had, ever since the beginning of the nineteenth century, for the British mercantile men and politicians. What is going on abroad all over the world is of more importance in London than in any other place on earth, and it is fully as important for commercial purposes that the news should be accurate as that it should be early. The Times, therefore, which has furnished British journalism with its model, has, from t
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry newspapers
e, given early and accurate intelligence a great commercial value, and the proprietors of leading journals have from the first carefully cultivated it. The story of Rothschild laying the foundation of his great fortune by being the first to reach London with the news of Waterloo is an illustration of the importance which reliable foreign intelligence has had, ever since the beginning of the nineteenth century, for the British mercantile men and politicians. What is going on abroad all over the world is of more importance in London than in any other place on earth, and it is fully as important for commercial purposes that the news should be accurate as that it should be early. The Times, therefore, which has furnished British journalism with its model, has, from the first, cultivated accuracy with great care, and with corresponding gain in weight and authority. In truth, this authority was never seriously shaken or impaired until the Pigott affair. The role of the American press i
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry newspapers
er, issued in April, 1704. With it newspaper reporting began. In the report of the execution of six pirates, the speeches, prayers, etc., were printed as near as it could be taken in writing in the great crowd. The dates of the first issuing of newspapers in the original thirteen States are as follows: In Massachusetts, 1704; Pennsylvania, 1719; New York, 1725; Maryland, 1728; South Carolina, 1732 (the first newspaper issued south of the Potomac) ; Rhode Island, 1732; Virginia, 1736; Connecticut, 1755; North Carolina, 1755; New Hampshire, 1756; Delaware, 1761. The first daily newspaper was the Pennsylvania packet, or General Advertiser, published by John Dunlap, in 1784, and afterwards called the Daily Advertiser. The number of newspapers in 1775 was only thirty-four, with a total weekly circulation of 5,000 copies. In 1833 the first of the cheap or penny papers was issued in New York by Benjamin H. Day. It was called the Sun, and immediately acquired an enormous circulation.
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry newspapers
ution of six pirates, the speeches, prayers, etc., were printed as near as it could be taken in writing in the great crowd. The dates of the first issuing of newspapers in the original thirteen States are as follows: In Massachusetts, 1704; Pennsylvania, 1719; New York, 1725; Maryland, 1728; South Carolina, 1732 (the first newspaper issued south of the Potomac) ; Rhode Island, 1732; Virginia, 1736; Connecticut, 1755; North Carolina, 1755; New Hampshire, 1756; Delaware, 1761. The first daily newspaper was the Pennsylvania packet, or General Advertiser, published by John Dunlap, in 1784, and afterwards called the Daily Advertiser. The number of newspapers in 1775 was only thirty-four, with a total weekly circulation of 5,000 copies. In 1833 the first of the cheap or penny papers was issued in New York by Benjamin H. Day. It was called the Sun, and immediately acquired an enormous circulation. It was at first less than a foot square. In 1901 the total number of newspapers and per
United States (United States) (search for this): entry newspapers
Newspapers. The first periodicals appeared in the United States at the beginning of the eighteenth century. The pioneer was called Public occurrences, and wasfoot square. In 1901 the total number of newspapers and periodicals in the United States was 20,879, comprising 2,158 dailies, 49 tri-weeklies, 472 semi-weeklies, 1the newspaper press in all countries in Europe, and almost down to his time in America, was looked upon as simply, or mainly, an ill-informed and often malignant cri of the extension of the suffrage, and, therefore, grew more rapidly in the United States than anywhere else. Every man conducts his business under the influence ofnd one more exacting in the matter of taste. The spread of the reading art in America was far more rapid from the beginning than in Europe, and brought into the marthe church door. European countries have been nearly 100 years behind the United States in the production of this class of readers and in the provision of newspape
eville compared a newspaper to a man standing at an open window and bawling to passers-by in the street. Down to his time the newspaper press in all countries in Europe, and almost down to his time in America, was looked upon as simply, or mainly, an ill-informed and often malignant critic of the government. The fearless and indtering for a smaller public, and one more exacting in the matter of taste. The spread of the reading art in America was far more rapid from the beginning than in Europe, and brought into the market at a very early period in the history of the newspaper a body of readers who enjoyed seeing in print all the local gossip—collected, however, from a much wider area— which they used to hear at the tavern, the store, and the church door. European countries have been nearly 100 years behind the United States in the production of this class of readers and in the provision of newspapers for their entertainment. In fact, it is only within the last thirty years th
and one of the tasks which the moralists of the period used to perform was calling the attention of the correspondents to the greater seriousness and regard for truth which their English brethren brought to their work. But they made little or no impression, and the reason was, in the main, that the French newspaper reader cares comparatively little for the news, and cares a great deal for the finish, or sprightliness, or drollery, as the case may be, of the editorial article. Men like Armand Carrel, Marc Girardin, Thiers, and Guizot, who either wielded great influence or rose into political power through journalism under the Restoration and the Monarchy of July, owed nothing whatever to what we call journalistic enterprise. They won fame as editorial writers simply. There could hardly be a more striking illustration of the fondness of the French public for editorial writing than the place which John Lemoine held for over thirty years in French esteem, owing to his articles in
sts of the period used to perform was calling the attention of the correspondents to the greater seriousness and regard for truth which their English brethren brought to their work. But they made little or no impression, and the reason was, in the main, that the French newspaper reader cares comparatively little for the news, and cares a great deal for the finish, or sprightliness, or drollery, as the case may be, of the editorial article. Men like Armand Carrel, Marc Girardin, Thiers, and Guizot, who either wielded great influence or rose into political power through journalism under the Restoration and the Monarchy of July, owed nothing whatever to what we call journalistic enterprise. They won fame as editorial writers simply. There could hardly be a more striking illustration of the fondness of the French public for editorial writing than the place which John Lemoine held for over thirty years in French esteem, owing to his articles in the Journal des Debats. It is no inju
w more than fifty years since Tocqueville compared a newspaper to a man standing at an open window and bawling to passers-by in the street. Down to his time the newspaper press in all countries in Europe, and almost down to his time in America, was looked upon as simply, or mainly, an ill-informed and often malignant critic of the government. The fearless and independent press of our great-grandfathers was a press that exposed the shortcomings of men in power in a style in which De Foe and Junius Press-room of a modern newspaper. set the fashion. The ideal editor of those days was a man who expected to be locked up on account of the boldness of his invectives against the government, but did not mind it. His news-gathering was so subordinate to his criticism that he was hardly thought of as a news-gatherer. Tocqueville's man bawling out of the window was not bawling out the latest intelligence. He was bawling about the blunders and corruption of the ministry, and showing them the
tasks which the moralists of the period used to perform was calling the attention of the correspondents to the greater seriousness and regard for truth which their English brethren brought to their work. But they made little or no impression, and the reason was, in the main, that the French newspaper reader cares comparatively little for the news, and cares a great deal for the finish, or sprightliness, or drollery, as the case may be, of the editorial article. Men like Armand Carrel, Marc Girardin, Thiers, and Guizot, who either wielded great influence or rose into political power through journalism under the Restoration and the Monarchy of July, owed nothing whatever to what we call journalistic enterprise. They won fame as editorial writers simply. There could hardly be a more striking illustration of the fondness of the French public for editorial writing than the place which John Lemoine held for over thirty years in French esteem, owing to his articles in the Journal de
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