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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 36 total hits in 17 results.

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Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry oliver-peter
Historical review of the Puritan government in Massachusetts in its Civil and ecclesiastical relations, from its rise to the abrogation of the first charter; Together with some General reflections on the English colonial policy and on the character of Puritanism. In this book, which revealed much literary skill as well as great learning, he emphasized the unfavorable side of the Puritan character, and severely criticised the Puritan policy. He died at sea in 1855. Jurist; born in Boston, Mass., March 26, 1713; was a brother of Andrew Oliver, and graduated at Harvard in 1730. After holding several offices, he was made judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts in 1756, and in 1771 chief-justice of that court. His course in Boston in opposition to the patriots made him very unpopular, and he was one of the crowd of loyalists who fled from that city with the British army in March, 1776. He went to England, where he lived on a pension from the British crown. He was an able wr
Hanover, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): entry oliver-peter
Oliver, Peter 1822-1855 Author; born in Hanover, N. H., in 1822; studied law and began practice in Suffolk county, Mass. He was the author of The Puritan commonwealth: an Historical review of the Puritan government in Massachusetts in its Civil and ecclesiastical relations, from its rise to the abrogation of the first charter; Together with some General reflections on the English colonial policy and on the character of Puritanism. In this book, which revealed much literary skill as well as great learning, he emphasized the unfavorable side of the Puritan character, and severely criticised the Puritan policy. He died at sea in 1855. Jurist; born in Boston, Mass., March 26, 1713; was a brother of Andrew Oliver, and graduated at Harvard in 1730. After holding several offices, he was made judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts in 1756, and in 1771 chief-justice of that court. His course in Boston in opposition to the patriots made him very unpopular, and he was one of
Suffolk County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry oliver-peter
Oliver, Peter 1822-1855 Author; born in Hanover, N. H., in 1822; studied law and began practice in Suffolk county, Mass. He was the author of The Puritan commonwealth: an Historical review of the Puritan government in Massachusetts in its Civil and ecclesiastical relations, from its rise to the abrogation of the first charter; Together with some General reflections on the English colonial policy and on the character of Puritanism. In this book, which revealed much literary skill as well as great learning, he emphasized the unfavorable side of the Puritan character, and severely criticised the Puritan policy. He died at sea in 1855. Jurist; born in Boston, Mass., March 26, 1713; was a brother of Andrew Oliver, and graduated at Harvard in 1730. After holding several offices, he was made judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts in 1756, and in 1771 chief-justice of that court. His course in Boston in opposition to the patriots made him very unpopular, and he was one o
Birmingham (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry oliver-peter
brother of Andrew Oliver, and graduated at Harvard in 1730. After holding several offices, he was made judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts in 1756, and in 1771 chief-justice of that court. His course in Boston in opposition to the patriots made him very unpopular, and he was one of the crowd of loyalists who fled from that city with the British army in March, 1776. He went to England, where he lived on a pension from the British crown. He was an able writer of both prose and poetry. Chief-Justice Oliver, on receiving his appointment, refused to accept his salary from the colony, and was impeached by the Assembly and declared suspended until the issue of the impeachment was reached. The Assembly of Massachusetts had voted the five judges of the Superior Court ample salaries from the colonial treasury, and called upon them to refuse the corrupting pay from the crown. Only Oliver refused, and he shared the fate of Hutchinson. He died in Birmingham, England, Oct. 13, 1791.
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry oliver-peter
d the Puritan policy. He died at sea in 1855. Jurist; born in Boston, Mass., March 26, 1713; was a brother of Andrew Oliver, and graduated at Harvard in 1730. After holding several offices, he was made judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts in 1756, and in 1771 chief-justice of that court. His course in Boston in opposition to the patriots made him very unpopular, and he was one of the crowd of loyalists who fled from that city with the British army in March, 1776. He went to England, where he lived on a pension from the British crown. He was an able writer of both prose and poetry. Chief-Justice Oliver, on receiving his appointment, refused to accept his salary from the colony, and was impeached by the Assembly and declared suspended until the issue of the impeachment was reached. The Assembly of Massachusetts had voted the five judges of the Superior Court ample salaries from the colonial treasury, and called upon them to refuse the corrupting pay from the crown.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry oliver-peter
Oliver, Peter 1822-1855 Author; born in Hanover, N. H., in 1822; studied law and began practice in Suffolk county, Mass. He was the author of The Puritan commonwealth: an Historical review of the Puritan government in Massachusetts in its Civil and ecclesiastical relations, from its rise to the abrogation of the first charter; Together with some General reflections on the English colonial policy and on the character of Puritanism. In this book, which revealed much literary skill as wellised the Puritan policy. He died at sea in 1855. Jurist; born in Boston, Mass., March 26, 1713; was a brother of Andrew Oliver, and graduated at Harvard in 1730. After holding several offices, he was made judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts in 1756, and in 1771 chief-justice of that court. His course in Boston in opposition to the patriots made him very unpopular, and he was one of the crowd of loyalists who fled from that city with the British army in March, 1776. He went to
Oliver, Peter 1822-1855 Author; born in Hanover, N. H., in 1822; studied law and began practice in Suffolk county, Mass. He was the author of The Puritan commonwealth: an Historical review of the Puritan government in Massachusetts in its Civil and ecclesiastical relations, from its rise to the abrogation of the first charter; Together with some General reflections on the English colonial policy and on the character of Puritanism. In this book, which revealed much literary skill as well as great learning, he emphasized the unfavorable side of the Puritan character, and severely criticised the Puritan policy. He died at sea in 1855. Jurist; born in Boston, Mass., March 26, 1713; was a brother of Andrew Oliver, and graduated at Harvard in 1730. After holding several offices, he was made judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts in 1756, and in 1771 chief-justice of that court. His course in Boston in opposition to the patriots made him very unpopular, and he was one o
e Puritan character, and severely criticised the Puritan policy. He died at sea in 1855. Jurist; born in Boston, Mass., March 26, 1713; was a brother of Andrew Oliver, and graduated at Harvard in 1730. After holding several offices, he was made judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts in 1756, and in 1771 chief-justice othe British army in March, 1776. He went to England, where he lived on a pension from the British crown. He was an able writer of both prose and poetry. Chief-Justice Oliver, on receiving his appointment, refused to accept his salary from the colony, and was impeached by the Assembly and declared suspended until the issue of thssue of the impeachment was reached. The Assembly of Massachusetts had voted the five judges of the Superior Court ample salaries from the colonial treasury, and called upon them to refuse the corrupting pay from the crown. Only Oliver refused, and he shared the fate of Hutchinson. He died in Birmingham, England, Oct. 13, 1791.
Thomas Hutchinson (search for this): entry oliver-peter
brother of Andrew Oliver, and graduated at Harvard in 1730. After holding several offices, he was made judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts in 1756, and in 1771 chief-justice of that court. His course in Boston in opposition to the patriots made him very unpopular, and he was one of the crowd of loyalists who fled from that city with the British army in March, 1776. He went to England, where he lived on a pension from the British crown. He was an able writer of both prose and poetry. Chief-Justice Oliver, on receiving his appointment, refused to accept his salary from the colony, and was impeached by the Assembly and declared suspended until the issue of the impeachment was reached. The Assembly of Massachusetts had voted the five judges of the Superior Court ample salaries from the colonial treasury, and called upon them to refuse the corrupting pay from the crown. Only Oliver refused, and he shared the fate of Hutchinson. He died in Birmingham, England, Oct. 13, 1791.
on the English colonial policy and on the character of Puritanism. In this book, which revealed much literary skill as well as great learning, he emphasized the unfavorable side of the Puritan character, and severely criticised the Puritan policy. He died at sea in 1855. Jurist; born in Boston, Mass., March 26, 1713; was a brother of Andrew Oliver, and graduated at Harvard in 1730. After holding several offices, he was made judge of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts in 1756, and in 1771 chief-justice of that court. His course in Boston in opposition to the patriots made him very unpopular, and he was one of the crowd of loyalists who fled from that city with the British army in March, 1776. He went to England, where he lived on a pension from the British crown. He was an able writer of both prose and poetry. Chief-Justice Oliver, on receiving his appointment, refused to accept his salary from the colony, and was impeached by the Assembly and declared suspended until the
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