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Brookfield, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry philip-king
fields, families in their beds at midnight, and congregations in houses of worship were attacked and massacred. They swept along the borders of the English settlements like a scythe of death for several months, and it seemed at one time as if the whole European population would be annihilated. From Springfield north to the Vermont line the valley of the Connecticut was desolated. Twenty Englishmen sent to treat with the Nipmucks were nearly all treacherously slain (Aug. 12, 1675) near Brookfield. They fired that village, but it was partially saved by a shower of rain. Early in September (12th) Deerfield was laid in ashes. On the same Sabbath-day Hadley, farther down the river, was attacked while the people were worshipping. A Defending a garrison House against attack. venerable-looking man, with white hair and beard, suddenly appeared, with a glittering sword, and led the people to a charge that dispersed the Indians, and then suddenly disappeared (see Goffe, William). Over
Medfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry philip-king
ire. Fully 1,000 warriors were slain or wounded, and several hundred were made prisoners. The English lost 86 killed and 150 wounded. Canonchet was slain, but Philip escaped and took refuge again with the Nipmucks. During the winter (1675-76) he vainly asked the Mohawks to join him, but tribes eastward of Massachusetts became his allies. In the spring of 1676 the work of destruction began. In the course of a few weeks the war extended over a space of almost 300 miles. Weymouth, Groton, Medfield, Lancaster, and Marlborough, in Massachusetts, were laid in ashes. Warwick and Providence, in Rhode Island, were burned, and isolated dwellings of settlers were everywhere laid waste. About 600 inhabitants of New England were killed in battle or murdered; twelve or thirteen towns were destroyed entirely, and about 600 buildings, chiefly dwelling-houses, were burned. The colonists had contracted an enormous debt for that period. Quarrels at length weakened the Indians. The Nipmucks and
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry philip-king
Deerfield. Encouraged by these successes, Philip now determined to attack Hatfield, the chief white settlement above Springfield. The Springfield Indians joined him, and with 1,000 warriors he fell upon the settlement (Oct. 29); but the English being prepared, he was repulsed with great loss. Alarmed, he moved towards Rhode Island, where the Narragansets, in violation of their treaty, received him and joined him on the war-path. Fifteen hundred men from Massachusetts, Plymouth, and Connecticut marched to chastise Canonchet for his perfidy. They found the treacherous Indians with Philip, 3,000 in number, in a fort within a swamp (South Kingston, R. I.), where their win- Mount hope. ter provisions had been gathered. Before that feeble palisade the English stood on a stormy day (Dec. 19). They began a siege, and in a few hours 500 wigwanis, with the provisions, were in flames. Hundreds of men, women, and children perished in the fire. Fully 1,000 warriors were slain or woun
Warwick (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry philip-king
de prisoners. The English lost 86 killed and 150 wounded. Canonchet was slain, but Philip escaped and took refuge again with the Nipmucks. During the winter (1675-76) he vainly asked the Mohawks to join him, but tribes eastward of Massachusetts became his allies. In the spring of 1676 the work of destruction began. In the course of a few weeks the war extended over a space of almost 300 miles. Weymouth, Groton, Medfield, Lancaster, and Marlborough, in Massachusetts, were laid in ashes. Warwick and Providence, in Rhode Island, were burned, and isolated dwellings of settlers were everywhere laid waste. About 600 inhabitants of New England were killed in battle or murdered; twelve or thirteen towns were destroyed entirely, and about 600 buildings, chiefly dwelling-houses, were burned. The colonists had contracted an enormous debt for that period. Quarrels at length weakened the Indians. The Nipmucks and Narragansets charged their misfortunes to the ambition of Philip, and they
Swansea (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry philip-king
with great skill. John Sassamon, who had been educated at Harvard, and was a sort of secretary for Philip, betrayed him, and the Wampanoags slew their secret enemy. For this act three of them were arrested on a charge of murder and were hanged. The anger of the nation was thereby fiercely kindled against the English, and they could not be restrained by the cautious Philip. He sent his women and children to the Narragansets for protection, and proclaimed war. He struck the first blow at Swanzey, July 4, 1675 (N. S.), 35 miles southwest of Plymouth, when the people were just returning from public worship, on a fast-day. Many were slain or captured. The surrounding settlements were aroused. The men of Boston, horse and foot, under Major Savage, joined the Plymouth forces, and all pressed towards Mount Hope. Philip and his warriors had fled to a swamp at Pocasset (Tiverton). There he was besieged many days, but finally escaped and took refuge with the Nipmucks, an interior tribe
Deerfield, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry philip-king
necticut was desolated. Twenty Englishmen sent to treat with the Nipmucks were nearly all treacherously slain (Aug. 12, 1675) near Brookfield. They fired that village, but it was partially saved by a shower of rain. Early in September (12th) Deerfield was laid in ashes. On the same Sabbath-day Hadley, farther down the river, was attacked while the people were worshipping. A Defending a garrison House against attack. venerable-looking man, with white hair and beard, suddenly appeared, witfe, William). Over other settlements the scourge swept mercilessly. Many valiant young men, under Captain Beers, were slain in Northfield (Sept. 23), and others— the flower of Essex —under Captain Lathrop, were butchered by 1,000 Indians near Deerfield. Encouraged by these successes, Philip now determined to attack Hatfield, the chief white settlement above Springfield. The Springfield Indians joined him, and with 1,000 warriors he fell upon the settlement (Oct. 29); but the English being p
New England (United States) (search for this): entry philip-king
of the white people. His capital was at Mount Hope, a conical hill, 300 feet high, not far from the eastern shore of Narraganset Bay. There he reigned supreme over the Pokanokets and Wampanoags, and there he planned a confederacy of several New England tribes, comprising about 5,000 souls. It was done secretly and with great skill. John Sassamon, who had been educated at Harvard, and was a sort of secretary for Philip, betrayed him, and the Wampanoags slew their secret enemy. For this actiles. Weymouth, Groton, Medfield, Lancaster, and Marlborough, in Massachusetts, were laid in ashes. Warwick and Providence, in Rhode Island, were burned, and isolated dwellings of settlers were everywhere laid waste. About 600 inhabitants of New England were killed in battle or murdered; twelve or thirteen towns were destroyed entirely, and about 600 buildings, chiefly dwelling-houses, were burned. The colonists had contracted an enormous debt for that period. Quarrels at length weakened th
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry philip-king
lish lost 86 killed and 150 wounded. Canonchet was slain, but Philip escaped and took refuge again with the Nipmucks. During the winter (1675-76) he vainly asked the Mohawks to join him, but tribes eastward of Massachusetts became his allies. In the spring of 1676 the work of destruction began. In the course of a few weeks the war extended over a space of almost 300 miles. Weymouth, Groton, Medfield, Lancaster, and Marlborough, in Massachusetts, were laid in ashes. Warwick and Providence, in Rhode Island, were burned, and isolated dwellings of settlers were everywhere laid waste. About 600 inhabitants of New England were killed in battle or murdered; twelve or thirteen towns were destroyed entirely, and about 600 buildings, chiefly dwelling-houses, were burned. The colonists had contracted an enormous debt for that period. Quarrels at length weakened the Indians. The Nipmucks and Narragansets charged their misfortunes to the ambition of Philip, and they deserted him. Some of
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): entry philip-king
was there hope for him. He aroused other tribes, and attempted a war of extermination by the secret and efficient methods of treachery, ambush, and surprise. Men in fields, families in their beds at midnight, and congregations in houses of worship were attacked and massacred. They swept along the borders of the English settlements like a scythe of death for several months, and it seemed at one time as if the whole European population would be annihilated. From Springfield north to the Vermont line the valley of the Connecticut was desolated. Twenty Englishmen sent to treat with the Nipmucks were nearly all treacherously slain (Aug. 12, 1675) near Brookfield. They fired that village, but it was partially saved by a shower of rain. Early in September (12th) Deerfield was laid in ashes. On the same Sabbath-day Hadley, farther down the river, was attacked while the people were worshipping. A Defending a garrison House against attack. venerable-looking man, with white hair and
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry philip-king
ar in July, 1675, and perished at its close, Aug. 12, 1676. The death of Philip occurred in this wise: An Indian deserter went to Captain Church, in Rhode Island, and told him that Philip Portrait and sign-manual of King Philip. was at Mount Hope, at the same time offering to guide him to the place and help to kill him, for the sachem had killed his (the informant's) brother, and it was his duty to kill the murderer. This was the faithless Indian who shot Philip. The barbarous law of England that a traitor should be quartered was carried out in the case of Philip. Church's Indian executioner performed that service with his hatchet upon the dead body of the sachem. King Philip's War. Massasoit kept his treaty of friendship with the Plymouth Colony faithfully until his death. Philip assumed the covenants with the English on the death of his father and kept them inviolate a dozen years. As he saw spreading settlements reducing his domains, acre by acre, his hunting-ground
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