hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 56 total hits in 21 results.

1 2 3
Point Lookout, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry pirates
name of piracy and the punishment of death were extended to the detention or transportation of any free negro or mulatto in any vessel as a slave. On June 28, 1861, the steamer St. Nicholas. Captain Kirwan, that plied between Baltimore and Point Lookout, at the mouth of the Potomac River, left the former place with forty or fifty passengers, including about twenty who passed for mechanics. There were a few women among them—one who professed to be a young Frenchwoman. When, on the following morning, the steamer was near Point Lookout, the Frenchwoman was suddenly transformed into a stout young man, and the twenty mechanics into well-armed Marylanders, who demanded the surrender of the St. Nicholas. Kirwan had no means for resistance, and yielded. The other passengers were landed on the Virginia shore, and the captain and crew kept as prisoners. Then 150 armed accomplices of the pirates went on board the steamer, which was destined for the Confederate navy. She cruised down th
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry pirates
uffered from the depredations of pirates on the southern coasts of what are now the United States and in the West Indies. In 1718 King George I. ordered a naval force to suppress them. At the same time he issued a proclamation promising pardon to all pirates who should surrender themselves in the space of twelve months. Capt. Woods Rogers, with a few vessels, took the island of New Providence, the chief rendezvous of the Pirates on a captured ship. pirates, in the name of the crown of England. All the pirates, excepting about ninety who escaped in a sloop, took advantage of the King's proclamation. Rogers was made governor of the island. He built forts, and had a military establishment. From that time the West Indies were fairly protected from the pirates. They yet infested the coast of the Carolinas. About thirty of them took possession of the mouth of the Cape Fear River. Governor Johnson determined to extirpate them. He sent out an armed vessel under the command of Wi
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry pirates
nt to cruise against them. Many conevictions and executions for piracy had taken place; but as there had been many escapes through loop-holes in the law, the act of Congress on that subject was revised and strengthened. In one of the sections of the new act the name of piracy and the punishment of death were extended to the detention or transportation of any free negro or mulatto in any vessel as a slave. On June 28, 1861, the steamer St. Nicholas. Captain Kirwan, that plied between Baltimore and Point Lookout, at the mouth of the Potomac River, left the former place with forty or fifty passengers, including about twenty who passed for mechanics. There were a few women among them—one who professed to be a young Frenchwoman. When, on the following morning, the steamer was near Point Lookout, the Frenchwoman was suddenly transformed into a stout young man, and the twenty mechanics into well-armed Marylanders, who demanded the surrender of the St. Nicholas. Kirwan had no means
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry pirates
t young man, and the twenty mechanics into well-armed Marylanders, who demanded the surrender of the St. Nicholas. Kirwan had no means for resistance, and yielded. The other passengers were landed on the Virginia shore, and the captain and crew kept as prisoners. Then 150 armed accomplices of the pirates went on board the steamer, which was destined for the Confederate navy. She cruised down the Chesapeake, captured three brigs, and, with her prizes, went up the Rappahannock River to Fredericksburg, where the pirates sold their plunder, divided the prize-money, and were entertained at a public dinner by the citizens. There the young Marylander produced much merriment by appearing in the costume of a Frenchwoman. A few days afterwards some of Kenly's Baltimore police were on the steamer Mary Washington, going home from a post on the Chesapeake. On board were Captain Kirwan and his crew; also Thomas and his associates, who had captured the St. Nicholas, evidently intending to repe
es. For a long time merchants and ship-masters suffered from the depredations of pirates on the southern coasts of what are now the United States and in the West Indies. In 1718 King George I. ordered a naval force to suppress them. At the same time he issued a proclamation promising pardon to all pirates who should surrendoop, took advantage of the King's proclamation. Rogers was made governor of the island. He built forts, and had a military establishment. From that time the West Indies were fairly protected from the pirates. They yet infested the coast of the Carolinas. About thirty of them took possession of the mouth of the Cape Fear River executed at Charleston. Privateersmen cruising under the Spanish-American flags degenerated into downright pirates. In 1819 Commodore Perry was sent to the West Indies in the frigate John Adams to cruise against the pirates who swarmed there; but before he had accomplished much he was smitten by yellow fever, and died just as
Swan Point (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry pirates
xecutions for piracy had taken place; but as there had been many escapes through loop-holes in the law, the act of Congress on that subject was revised and strengthened. In one of the sections of the new act the name of piracy and the punishment of death were extended to the detention or transportation of any free negro or mulatto in any vessel as a slave. On June 28, 1861, the steamer St. Nicholas. Captain Kirwan, that plied between Baltimore and Point Lookout, at the mouth of the Potomac River, left the former place with forty or fifty passengers, including about twenty who passed for mechanics. There were a few women among them—one who professed to be a young Frenchwoman. When, on the following morning, the steamer was near Point Lookout, the Frenchwoman was suddenly transformed into a stout young man, and the twenty mechanics into well-armed Marylanders, who demanded the surrender of the St. Nicholas. Kirwan had no means for resistance, and yielded. The other passengers
Cape Fear (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry pirates
ovidence, the chief rendezvous of the Pirates on a captured ship. pirates, in the name of the crown of England. All the pirates, excepting about ninety who escaped in a sloop, took advantage of the King's proclamation. Rogers was made governor of the island. He built forts, and had a military establishment. From that time the West Indies were fairly protected from the pirates. They yet infested the coast of the Carolinas. About thirty of them took possession of the mouth of the Cape Fear River. Governor Johnson determined to extirpate them. He sent out an armed vessel under the command of William Rhett, who captured a piratical sloop with its commander and about thirty men, and took then to Charleston. Johnson soon afterwards embarked in person, and sailed after and captured another armed sloop. All the pirates excepting two were killed during the desperate fight that occurred, and those two were hanged. Those first taken into Charleston were also hanged, excepting one ma
Trinidad (Trinidad and Tobago) (search for this): entry pirates
those two were hanged. Those first taken into Charleston were also hanged, excepting one man. Altogether, forty-two pirates were executed at Charleston. Privateersmen cruising under the Spanish-American flags degenerated into downright pirates. In 1819 Commodore Perry was sent to the West Indies in the frigate John Adams to cruise against the pirates who swarmed there; but before he had accomplished much he was smitten by yellow fever, and died just as his ship was entering the port of Trinidad. Two other small vessels were sent to cruise against them. Many conevictions and executions for piracy had taken place; but as there had been many escapes through loop-holes in the law, the act of Congress on that subject was revised and strengthened. In one of the sections of the new act the name of piracy and the punishment of death were extended to the detention or transportation of any free negro or mulatto in any vessel as a slave. On June 28, 1861, the steamer St. Nicholas. Ca
United States (United States) (search for this): entry pirates
Pirates. For a long time merchants and ship-masters suffered from the depredations of pirates on the southern coasts of what are now the United States and in the West Indies. In 1718 King George I. ordered a naval force to suppress them. At the same time he issued a proclamation promising pardon to all pirates who should surrender themselves in the space of twelve months. Capt. Woods Rogers, with a few vessels, took the island of New Providence, the chief rendezvous of the Pirates on a captured ship. pirates, in the name of the crown of England. All the pirates, excepting about ninety who escaped in a sloop, took advantage of the King's proclamation. Rogers was made governor of the island. He built forts, and had a military establishment. From that time the West Indies were fairly protected from the pirates. They yet infested the coast of the Carolinas. About thirty of them took possession of the mouth of the Cape Fear River. Governor Johnson determined to extirpate
Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry pirates
nsformed into a stout young man, and the twenty mechanics into well-armed Marylanders, who demanded the surrender of the St. Nicholas. Kirwan had no means for resistance, and yielded. The other passengers were landed on the Virginia shore, and the captain and crew kept as prisoners. Then 150 armed accomplices of the pirates went on board the steamer, which was destined for the Confederate navy. She cruised down the Chesapeake, captured three brigs, and, with her prizes, went up the Rappahannock River to Fredericksburg, where the pirates sold their plunder, divided the prize-money, and were entertained at a public dinner by the citizens. There the young Marylander produced much merriment by appearing in the costume of a Frenchwoman. A few days afterwards some of Kenly's Baltimore police were on the steamer Mary Washington, going home from a post on the Chesapeake. On board were Captain Kirwan and his crew; also Thomas and his associates, who had captured the St. Nicholas, evident
1 2 3