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Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): entry presidential-elections
ts progenitor. (b) No candidate having a majority of the electoral vote, the House of Representatives elected Adams. (c) Candidate of the Anti-masonic party. (d) There being no choice, the Senate elected Johnson. (e) Eleven Southern States, being within the belligerent territory, did not vote. (f) Three Southern States disfranchised. (g) Horace Greeley died after election, and Democratic electors scattered their vote. (h) There being a dispute over the electoral votes of Florida, Louisiana, Oregon, and South Carolina, they were referred by Congress to an electoral commission composed of eight Republicans and seven Democrats, which, by a strict party vote, awarded 185 electoral votes to Hayes and 184 to Tilden. (i) Free Democrat. (j) Free Silver Prohibition party. (k) In Massachusetts. There was also a Native American ticket in that State, which received 184 votes. (m) Middle-of-the-road, or Anti-fusion People's party. (n) United Christian party. (o) Union Reform party.
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): entry presidential-elections
. Y.Amer 1880. James A. Garfield*O.Rep4,449,0537,018214Chester A. Arthur*N. Y.Rep214 W. S. HancockPa.Dem4,442,035155William H. EnglishInd.Dem155 James B. WeaverIowaGre'nb307,306B. J. ChambersTexGre'nb Neal DowMe.Pro10,305H. A. ThompsonO.Pro John W. PhelpsVt.Amer707S. C. PomeroyKanAmer 1884. Grover Cleveland*O.Dem4,911,0176mer 1892. Grover Cleveland*N. Y.Dem5,556,918380,810277Adlai E. Stevenson*Ill.Dem277 Benjamin HarrisonInd.Rep5,176,108145Whitelaw ReidN. Y.Rep145 James B. WeaverIowaPeop1,041,02822James G. FieldVaPeop22 John BidwellCal.Pro264,133James B. CranfillTexPro Simon WingMass.Soc. L.21,164Charles H. MatchettN. Y.Soc. L. 1896. Willus DonnellyMinnM. P. (m) Eugene V. DebsInd.Soc. D.84,003Job HarrimanCalSoc. D. Joseph F. MalloneyMass.Soc. L.39,537Valentine RemmelPaSoc. L. J. F. R. LeonardIowaU. C. (n)1,060John G. WoolleyIll.U. C. (n) Seth H. EllisO.U. R. (o)5,698Samuel T. NicholasPaU. R.(o) *The candidates starred were elected. (a) The first Republ
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): entry presidential-elections
ist, 14. For Vice-President, George Clinton, Republican, 162; Rufus King, of New York, Federalist, 14. Jefferson was chosen President and Clinton Vice-President. (a) For foot-note reference, see page 291. 1808. For President, James Madison, of Virginia, Republican, 122; Charles C. Pinckney, of South Carolina, Federalist, 47; George Clinton, of New York, Republican, 6. For Vice-President, George Clinton, Republican, 113; Rufus King, of New York, Federalist, 47; John Langdon, of New Hampshire, 9; James Madison, 3; James Monroe, 3. Vacancy, 1. Madison was chosen President and Clinton Vice-President. 1812. For President, James Madison, Republican, 128; De Witt Clinton, of New York, Federalist, 89. For Vice-President, Elbridge Gerry, of Massachusetts, 131; Jared Ingersoll, of Pennsylvania, Federalist, 86. Vacancy, 1. Madison was chosen President and Gerry Vice-President. 1816. For President, James Monroe, of Virginia, Republican, 183; Rufus King, of New York, Federali
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry presidential-elections
WalkerIll.Amer2,636D. KirkpatrickN. Y.Amer 1880. James A. Garfield*O.Rep4,449,0537,018214Chester A. Arthur*N. Y.Rep214 W. S. HancockPa.Dem4,442,035155William H. EnglishInd.Dem155 James B. WeaverIowaGre'nb307,306B. J. ChambersTexGre'nb Neal DowMe.Pro10,305H. A. ThompsonO.Pro John W. PhelpsVt.Amer707S. C. PomeroyKanAmer 1884. Grover Cleveland*O.Dem4,911,01762,683219T. A. Hendricks*Ind.Dem219 James G. BlaineMe.Rep4,848,334182John A. LoganIll.Rep182 John P. St. JohnKanPro151,809William DaMe.Rep4,848,334182John A. LoganIll.Rep182 John P. St. JohnKanPro151,809William DanielMdPro Benjamin F. ButlerMass.Peop133,825A. M. WestMissPeop P. D. WiggintonCalAmer 1888. Grover ClevelandN. Y.Dem5,538,23398,017168Allen G. ThurmanO.Dem168 Benjamin Harrison*Ind.Rep5,440,216233Levi P. Morton*N. Y.Rep233 Clinton B. FiskN. J.Pro249,907John A. BrooksMo.Pro Alson J. StreeterIll.U. L.148,105C. E. CunninghamArkU'd L. R. H. CowdryIll.U'd L.2,808W. H. T. WakefieldKan.U'd L. James L. CurtisN. Y.Amer1,591James B. GreerTennAmer 1892. Grover Cleveland*N. Y.Dem5,556,918380,810
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): entry presidential-elections
s its progenitor. (b) No candidate having a majority of the electoral vote, the House of Representatives elected Adams. (c) Candidate of the Anti-masonic party. (d) There being no choice, the Senate elected Johnson. (e) Eleven Southern States, being within the belligerent territory, did not vote. (f) Three Southern States disfranchised. (g) Horace Greeley died after election, and Democratic electors scattered their vote. (h) There being a dispute over the electoral votes of Florida, Louisiana, Oregon, and South Carolina, they were referred by Congress to an electoral commission composed of eight Republicans and seven Democrats, which, by a strict party vote, awarded 185 electoral votes to Hayes and 184 to Tilden. (i) Free Democrat. (j) Free Silver Prohibition party. (k) In Massachusetts. There was also a Native American ticket in that State, which received 184 votes. (m) Middle-of-the-road, or Anti-fusion People's party. (n) United Christian party. (o) Union Reform party
Nebraska (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): entry presidential-elections
exPro Simon WingMass.Soc. L.21,164Charles H. MatchettN. Y.Soc. L. 1896. William McKinley*O.Rep7,104,779601,854271Garret A. Hobart*N. J.Rep271 William J. BryanNeb.Dem6,502,925176Arthur SewallMeDem176 William J. BryanNeb.PeopThomas E. WatsonGaPeop Joshua LeveringMd.Pro132,007Hale JohnsonIll.Pro John M. PalmerIll.N. Dem133,1Neb.PeopThomas E. WatsonGaPeop Joshua LeveringMd.Pro132,007Hale JohnsonIll.Pro John M. PalmerIll.N. Dem133,148Simon B. BucknerKyN. Dem Charles H. MatchettN. Y.Soc. L.36,274Matthew MaguireN. J.Soc. L. Charles E. BentleyNebNat. (j)13,969James H. SouthgateN. C.Nat. (j) 1900. William McKinley*O.Rep7,206,677832,280292Theodore Roosevelt*N. Y.Rep292 William J. BryanNeb.Dem. P.6,374,397155Adlai E. StevensonIll.Dem. P.155 John G. WooNeb.Dem. P.6,374,397155Adlai E. StevensonIll.Dem. P.155 John G. WoolleyIll.Pro208,555Henry B. MetcalfO.Pro Wharton BarkerPa.M. P. (m)50,337Ignatius DonnellyMinnM. P. (m) Eugene V. DebsInd.Soc. D.84,003Job HarrimanCalSoc. D. Joseph F. MalloneyMass.Soc. L.39,537Valentine RemmelPaSoc. L. J. F. R. LeonardIowaU. C. (n)1,060John G. WoolleyIll.U. C. (n) Seth H. EllisO.U. R. (o)5,698Samuel T. Ni
California (California, United States) (search for this): entry presidential-elections
jamin Harrison*Ind.Rep5,440,216233Levi P. Morton*N. Y.Rep233 Clinton B. FiskN. J.Pro249,907John A. BrooksMo.Pro Alson J. StreeterIll.U. L.148,105C. E. CunninghamArkU'd L. R. H. CowdryIll.U'd L.2,808W. H. T. WakefieldKan.U'd L. James L. CurtisN. Y.Amer1,591James B. GreerTennAmer 1892. Grover Cleveland*N. Y.Dem5,556,918380,810277Adlai E. Stevenson*Ill.Dem277 Benjamin HarrisonInd.Rep5,176,108145Whitelaw ReidN. Y.Rep145 James B. WeaverIowaPeop1,041,02822James G. FieldVaPeop22 John BidwellCal.Pro264,133James B. CranfillTexPro Simon WingMass.Soc. L.21,164Charles H. MatchettN. Y.Soc. L. 1896. William McKinley*O.Rep7,104,779601,854271Garret A. Hobart*N. J.Rep271 William J. BryanNeb.Dem6,502,925176Arthur SewallMeDem176 William J. BryanNeb.PeopThomas E. WatsonGaPeop Joshua LeveringMd.Pro132,007Hale JohnsonIll.Pro John M. PalmerIll.N. Dem133,148Simon B. BucknerKyN. Dem Charles H. MatchettN. Y.Soc. L.36,274Matthew MaguireN. J.Soc. L. Charles E. BentleyNebNat. (j)13,969James
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry presidential-elections
ridge Gerry, of Massachusetts, 131; Jared Ingersoll, of Pennsylvania, Federalist, 86. Vacancy, 1. Madison was chosen President and Gerry Vice-President. 1816. For President, James Monroe, of Virginia, Republican, 183; Rufus King, of New York, Federalist, 34. For Vice-President. Daniel D. Tompkins, of New York, Republican, 183; John Eager Howard, of Maryland, Federalist, 22; James Ross, of Pennsylvania, 5; John Marshall, of Virginia, 4; Robert G. Harper, of Maryland, 3. Vacancies, 4. Monroe was chosen President and Tompkins Vice-President. 1820. For President, James Monroe, of Virginia, Republican, 231; John Q. Adams, of Massachusetts, Republican, 1. For Vice-President, Daniel D. Tompkins, Republican, 218; Richard Stockton, of New Jersey, 8; Daniel Rodney, of Delaware, 4; Robert G. Harper, of Maryland, and Richard Rush, of Pennsylvania, 1 vote each. Vacancies, 3. James Monroe was chosen President and Daniel D. Tompkins Vice-President. The popular vote for the principal
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry presidential-elections
rences see page 291.MeRep180 Stephen A. DouglasIll.Dem1,375,15712H. V.JohnsonGaDem12 J. C. Breckinge H. PendletonO.Dem21 1868. Ulysses S. Grant*Ill.Rep3,015,071305,456(f) 214Schuyler Colfax*Ind.ReF. P. Blair, JrMoDem80 1872. Ulysses S. Grant*Ill.Rep3,597,070762,991286Henry Wilson*Mass.Rep286 tGaDem5 Charles J. JenkinsGa.Dem2John M. PalmerIll.Dem3 David DavisIll.Ind.1T. E. BramletteKyDem3 Pro.9,522Gideon T. StewartO.Pro James B. WalkerIll.Amer2,636D. KirkpatrickN. Y.Amer 1880. James Aro249,907John A. BrooksMo.Pro Alson J. StreeterIll.U. L.148,105C. E. CunninghamArkU'd L. R. H. Cowd*N. Y.Dem5,556,918380,810277Adlai E. Stevenson*Ill.Dem277 Benjamin HarrisonInd.Rep5,176,108145WhitGaPeop Joshua LeveringMd.Pro132,007Hale JohnsonIll.Pro John M. PalmerIll.N. Dem133,148Simon B. BucIll.N. Dem133,148Simon B. BucknerKyN. Dem Charles H. MatchettN. Y.Soc. L.36,274Matthew MaguireN. J.Soc. L. Charles E. Bentleylai E. StevensonIll.Dem. P.155 John G. WoolleyIll.Pro208,555Henry B. MetcalfO.Pro Wharton BarkerP[7 more...]
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): entry presidential-elections
ic party as its progenitor. (b) No candidate having a majority of the electoral vote, the House of Representatives elected Adams. (c) Candidate of the Anti-masonic party. (d) There being no choice, the Senate elected Johnson. (e) Eleven Southern States, being within the belligerent territory, did not vote. (f) Three Southern States disfranchised. (g) Horace Greeley died after election, and Democratic electors scattered their vote. (h) There being a dispute over the electoral votes of Florida, Louisiana, Oregon, and South Carolina, they were referred by Congress to an electoral commission composed of eight Republicans and seven Democrats, which, by a strict party vote, awarded 185 electoral votes to Hayes and 184 to Tilden. (i) Free Democrat. (j) Free Silver Prohibition party. (k) In Massachusetts. There was also a Native American ticket in that State, which received 184 votes. (m) Middle-of-the-road, or Anti-fusion People's party. (n) United Christian party. (o) Union Re
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