hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 1,656 total hits in 587 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
Pompton (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry revolutionary-war
patriotism by nobly refusing it, saying: Necessity wrung from us the act of demanding justice from Congress, but we desire no reward for doing our duty to our bleeding country. On Jan. 18, 1781, a portion of the New Jersey line, stationed at Pompton, followed the example of the Pennsylvanians, at Morristown, in refusing to serve longer unless their reasonable demands on Congress were attended to. Washington, fearing the revolt, if so mildly dealt with as it had been by Wayne, would become fatally infectious and cause the army to melt away, took harsher measures to suppress it. He sent Gen. Robert Howe, with 500 men, to restore order at Pompton. They surrounded the camp and compelled the troops to parade without arms. Two of the ringleaders were tried, condemned, and immediately executed, when the remainder quietly submitted. These events had a salutary effect, for they aroused the Congress and the people to the necessity of more efficient measures for the support of the army,
Jamestown, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry revolutionary-war
ody of Hessians at New York, he had countermanded an order for the earl to send him troops, and for this he was now thankful. On Sept. 5, while the allies were encamped at Chester, Pa., Washington was informed that De Grasse had entered Chesapeake Bay. In that event he saw a sure prophecy of success. De Grasse had moored his fleet in Lynn Haven Bay, and so barred the entrance to the York River against reinforcements for Cornwallis. He had landed 3,000 troops on the peninsula, near old Jamestown. Meanwhile De Barras had sailed for Newport with a fleet convoying ten transports laden with ordnance for the siege of Yorktown. The British admiral, Graves, on hearing of the approach of the French fleet, had sailed for the Chesapeake. De Grasse went out to meet him, and on Sept. 5 they had a sharp engagement. The British fleet was so shattered that it retired to New York, leaving De Grasse master of the Chesapeake. When Clinton was assured that the allies were bound for Virginia, he
Ogeechee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry revolutionary-war
ld enjoy the free navigation of the Mississippi River Sept. 17, 1779 Naval engagement off Flamborough Head, England; the Bon Homme Richard (American), Paul Jones commander, captures the British gun-ship Serapis Sept. 23, 1779 John Jay appointed minister to Spain, and John Adams to negotiate a peace with Great Britain Sept. 27, 1779 Siege of Savannah, Ga., by Americans and French, fails; Pulaski killedSept. 23-Oct. 9, 1779 A company of British regulars and four armed vessels in the Ogeechee River, Ga., surrenders to Colonel WhiteOct. 1, 1779 British evacuate Rhode Island Oct. 11-25, 1779 M. Gerard succeeded by the Chevalier de la Luzerne as minister from France to the United StatesNov. 17, 1779 American army winters at Morristown Dec., 1779 General Clinton sails from New York against Charleston Dec. 26, 1779 Washington reprimands General Arnold, by order of Congress, for misconduct charged by the council of Philadelphia Jan., 1780 Gen. Charles Lee dismissed from the army
Purysburg (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry revolutionary-war
ls lying at the wharfs Sept. 5, 1778 Benjamin Franklin appointed minister to the Court of France Sept. 14, 1778 Massacre by Indians and Tories at Cherry Valley, N. Y. Nov. 10, 1778 British troops under Howe capture Savannah; the Americans retreat across the Savannah River Dec. 29, 1778 Northern American army hutted in cantonments from Danbury, Conn., to Elizabethtown, N. J., for the winter1778-79 Maj.-Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, commanding the Southern forces, establishes his first post at Purysburg, on the Savannah River 1779 Congress calls upon the States for their quotas of $15,000,000 for the year, and $6,000,000 annually for eighteen years to follow as a sinking-fundJan. 2, 1779 Vincennes, Ind., captured by the British Jan., 1779 British under General McLane take possession of Castine, Me Jan. 12, 1779 British under Major Gardiner driven from Port Royal Island by General Moultrie Feb. 3, 1779 Franklin commissioned sole minister plenipotentiary to France, and Adams recal
Barren Hill (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry revolutionary-war
amp at Valley Forge Feb., 1778 Bill introduced by Lord North in Parliament concerning peace negotiations with America reaches Congress April 15, and is rejected April 22, 1778 French treaty reaches Congress by messenger May 2, 1778 Deane's treaty with France ratifiedMay 4, 1778 Mischianza, a festival, is given at Philadelphia by the British officers in honor of Sir William Howe (who had been succeeded by Sir Henry Clinton), six days before his return to England May 18, 1778 Affair at Barren HillMay 20, 1778 British raid in Warren and Bristol, R. I.May 25, 1778 Col. Ethan Allen, released from im- prisonment, returns to Bennington, Vt. May 31, 1778 Earl of Carlisle, George Johnstone, and William Eden, appointed peace commissioners to America, with Prof. Adam Ferguson as secretaryJune 10, 1778 British evacuate Philadelphia and retire across the Delaware into New Jersey June 18, 1778 Americans break camp at Valley Forge and follow June 18, 1778 Battle of Monmouth Court-hou
h July 11, 1782 Treaty of amity and commerce concluded by Mr. Adams, on part of the United States, with HollandOct. 8, 1782 Preliminary articles of peace signed at Paris by Richard Oswald for Great Britain, and by John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, and Henry Laurens for the United StatesNov. 30, 1782 British evacuate Charleston, S. C.Dec. 14, 1782 French army embarks from Boston for San Domingo, having been in the United States two years five months and fourteen days Dec. 24, 1782 Sweden recognizes independence of United States Feb. 5, 1783 Denmark recognizes independence of United States Feb. 25, 1783 Congress being unable to pay either officers or men of the army, an anonymous address is circulated, March 11, 1783, advising the army at Newburg, N. Y., to enforce its claims. The situation is critical, but Washington, by an admirable address, obtains from the officers a declaration of confidence in Congress and the country.March 15, 1783 Congress grants five years fu
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry revolutionary-war
. 4, 1783 British evacuate Long Island and Staten Island (withdrawing their last armed man sent for the purpose of reducing the colonies to subjection) Dec. 4, 1783 Washington resigns his commission as commander-in-chief at the State-house, Annapolis, Md., and retires to Mount Vernon Dec. 23, 1783 Congress ratifies the definitive treaty of peace Jan. 14, 1784 Sketches and portraits of all the important participants, and details of all noteworthy events in the war, will be found under theirew Jersey; threatened to attack the works in the Hudson Highlands; and sent Arnold on a marauding expedition into New England. But neither Clinton's menaces nor Arnold's atrocities stayed the onward march of the allies. They made their way to Annapolis, and thence by water to the James River in transports furnished by De Barras. From Baltimore Washington, accompanied by Rochambeau and the Marquis de Chastellux, visited his home at Mount Vernon, from which he had been absent since June, 1775.
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry revolutionary-war
s appointed a special minister to France to secure a loanDec., 1780 Pennsylvania troops break camp at Morristown, Jan. 1, demanding back pay. Congress appoints a commission, which accedes to their demandJan. 1, 1781 Benedict Arnold plunders Richmond, Va. Jan. 5-6, 1781 Robert R. Livingston appointed secretary of foreign affairs by CongressJan., 1781 Battle of Cowpens, S. C.; American victory Jan. 17, 1781 Mutiny of New Jersey troops quelled by Gen. Robert Howe Jan. 23-27, 1781 Young's houks in the Hudson Highlands; and sent Arnold on a marauding expedition into New England. But neither Clinton's menaces nor Arnold's atrocities stayed the onward march of the allies. They made their way to Annapolis, and thence by water to the James River in transports furnished by De Barras. From Baltimore Washington, accompanied by Rochambeau and the Marquis de Chastellux, visited his home at Mount Vernon, from which he had been absent since June, 1775. There they remained two days, and the
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): entry revolutionary-war
Savannah for the evacuation of the province June 14, 1782 Savannah, Ga., evacuated by the British July 11, 1782 Treaty of amity and commerce concluded by Mr. Adams, on part of the United States, with HollandOct. 8, 1782 Preliminary articles of peace signed at Paris by Richard Oswald for Great Britain, and by John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, and Henry Laurens for the United StatesNov. 30, 1782 British evacuate Charleston, S. C.Dec. 14, 1782 French army embarks from Boston for San Domingo, having been in the United States two years five months and fourteen days Dec. 24, 1782 Sweden recognizes independence of United States Feb. 5, 1783 Denmark recognizes independence of United States Feb. 25, 1783 Congress being unable to pay either officers or men of the army, an anonymous address is circulated, March 11, 1783, advising the army at Newburg, N. Y., to enforce its claims. The situation is critical, but Washington, by an admirable address, obtains from the officers a
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry revolutionary-war
ch 2, 1776 Howe evacuates Boston March 17, 1776 Congress authorizes privateeringMarch 23, 1776 Congress orders the ports open to all nations April 6, 1776 North Carolina declares for independence April 22, 1776 American forces under Gen. John Thomas retire from the siege of Quebec May 6, 1776 Rhode Island, May 4; Massachusetes from eight States—New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New York, Virginia, and South CarolinaJuly 9, 1778 Delegates from North Carolina sign them July 21, 1778 Delegates from Georgia sign themJuly 24, 1778 French fleet, under Count D'Estaing, enters Narraganset Bay July 29, 1778 M. Gerard, red to Captain Hudson of the British navyMay 6, 1780 Charleston, S. C., capitulatesMay 12, 1780 Massacre of Americans under Colonel Buford at Waxhaw, on the North Carolina border, by British under Tarleton May 29, 1780 General Clinton proclaims South Carolina subject to England June 3, 1780 Battle of Ramsour's Mills, N. C.June
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...