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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 22 total hits in 8 results.

Sag Harbor (New York, United States) (search for this): entry sag-harbor-expedition-to
Sag Harbor, expedition to Early in 1777 the British gathered much forage at Sag Harbor, at the eastern end of Long Island, protected by an armed schooner and a company of infantry. General Parsons, in command in Connecticut, sent Lieutenant-Colonel Meigs with 170 men in thirty whale-boats to capture or destroy their forage. Sag Harbor, at the eastern end of Long Island, protected by an armed schooner and a company of infantry. General Parsons, in command in Connecticut, sent Lieutenant-Colonel Meigs with 170 men in thirty whale-boats to capture or destroy their forage. They landed near Southold, carried their boats across to a bay, about 15 miles, and, re-embarking, landed before daylight about 4 miles from Sag Harbor. They took the place by surprise, May 25, killing six men and capturing ninety. They burned the forage and twelve vessels, and returned without the loss of a man. their forage. They landed near Southold, carried their boats across to a bay, about 15 miles, and, re-embarking, landed before daylight about 4 miles from Sag Harbor. They took the place by surprise, May 25, killing six men and capturing ninety. They burned the forage and twelve vessels, and returned without the loss of a man.
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry sag-harbor-expedition-to
Sag Harbor, expedition to Early in 1777 the British gathered much forage at Sag Harbor, at the eastern end of Long Island, protected by an armed schooner and a company of infantry. General Parsons, in command in Connecticut, sent Lieutenant-Colonel Meigs with 170 men in thirty whale-boats to capture or destroy their forage. They landed near Southold, carried their boats across to a bay, about 15 miles, and, re-embarking, landed before daylight about 4 miles from Sag Harbor. They took the place by surprise, May 25, killing six men and capturing ninety. They burned the forage and twelve vessels, and returned without the loss of a man.
Southold (New York, United States) (search for this): entry sag-harbor-expedition-to
Sag Harbor, expedition to Early in 1777 the British gathered much forage at Sag Harbor, at the eastern end of Long Island, protected by an armed schooner and a company of infantry. General Parsons, in command in Connecticut, sent Lieutenant-Colonel Meigs with 170 men in thirty whale-boats to capture or destroy their forage. They landed near Southold, carried their boats across to a bay, about 15 miles, and, re-embarking, landed before daylight about 4 miles from Sag Harbor. They took the place by surprise, May 25, killing six men and capturing ninety. They burned the forage and twelve vessels, and returned without the loss of a man.
Long Island City (New York, United States) (search for this): entry sag-harbor-expedition-to
Sag Harbor, expedition to Early in 1777 the British gathered much forage at Sag Harbor, at the eastern end of Long Island, protected by an armed schooner and a company of infantry. General Parsons, in command in Connecticut, sent Lieutenant-Colonel Meigs with 170 men in thirty whale-boats to capture or destroy their forage. They landed near Southold, carried their boats across to a bay, about 15 miles, and, re-embarking, landed before daylight about 4 miles from Sag Harbor. They took the place by surprise, May 25, killing six men and capturing ninety. They burned the forage and twelve vessels, and returned without the loss of a man.
Sag Harbor, expedition to Early in 1777 the British gathered much forage at Sag Harbor, at the eastern end of Long Island, protected by an armed schooner and a company of infantry. General Parsons, in command in Connecticut, sent Lieutenant-Colonel Meigs with 170 men in thirty whale-boats to capture or destroy their forage. They landed near Southold, carried their boats across to a bay, about 15 miles, and, re-embarking, landed before daylight about 4 miles from Sag Harbor. They took the place by surprise, May 25, killing six men and capturing ninety. They burned the forage and twelve vessels, and returned without the loss of a man.
Sag Harbor, expedition to Early in 1777 the British gathered much forage at Sag Harbor, at the eastern end of Long Island, protected by an armed schooner and a company of infantry. General Parsons, in command in Connecticut, sent Lieutenant-Colonel Meigs with 170 men in thirty whale-boats to capture or destroy their forage. They landed near Southold, carried their boats across to a bay, about 15 miles, and, re-embarking, landed before daylight about 4 miles from Sag Harbor. They took the place by surprise, May 25, killing six men and capturing ninety. They burned the forage and twelve vessels, and returned without the loss of a man.
Sag Harbor, expedition to Early in 1777 the British gathered much forage at Sag Harbor, at the eastern end of Long Island, protected by an armed schooner and a company of infantry. General Parsons, in command in Connecticut, sent Lieutenant-Colonel Meigs with 170 men in thirty whale-boats to capture or destroy their forage. They landed near Southold, carried their boats across to a bay, about 15 miles, and, re-embarking, landed before daylight about 4 miles from Sag Harbor. They took the place by surprise, May 25, killing six men and capturing ninety. They burned the forage and twelve vessels, and returned without the loss of a man.
Sag Harbor, expedition to Early in 1777 the British gathered much forage at Sag Harbor, at the eastern end of Long Island, protected by an armed schooner and a company of infantry. General Parsons, in command in Connecticut, sent Lieutenant-Colonel Meigs with 170 men in thirty whale-boats to capture or destroy their forage. They landed near Southold, carried their boats across to a bay, about 15 miles, and, re-embarking, landed before daylight about 4 miles from Sag Harbor. They took the place by surprise, May 25, killing six men and capturing ninety. They burned the forage and twelve vessels, and returned without the loss of a man.